H/T Town Hall.

Maxine’s district will tolerate her as long as she keeps the pork rolling in.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., has become President Donald Trump’s fiercest congressional critic. In eight years, Obama never had a Republican nemesis the likes of Waters, who recently said, “I’m taking the gloves off.” Seventeen years ago, I wrote Waters a letter. She never answered. It read, in part:

Congresswoman Waters,

Your power in America, and especially in the black community, is substantial. I honestly, and sincerely, urge you to rethink your positions on several issues. Despite my acknowledged harsh criticisms of you, I never once attacked you personally. I said, on many occasions: “I don’t question her heart, but I question her head.” I called you a hardworking, tireless warrior for your views.

However, your position on major issues affecting the black community is simply flat-out wrong. Not only do your positions fail to advance the interests of blacks but also, in many cases, actually hurt them.

In “America in Black and White,” authors Stephen and Abigail Thernstrom clearly show that the black middle class preceded affirmative action. By affirmative action, I mean preferences, the lowering of standards to achieve “diversity” or “multiculturalism” or “inclusion.” I do not include outreach, or using efforts to inform others, irrespective of race, gender, etc., of available opportunities. Moreover, affirmative action insults the hardworking black men and women of this country who, since slavery, built the black middle class, day by day, brick by brick, backache by backache.

In 1963, Ebony magazine ran a series of motivational articles called, “If I Were Young Today.” Each month, they asked a black achiever — Federal District Judge Herman Moore, union leader A. Philip Randolph, famed Los Angeles architect Paul Williams — to provide advice to today’s youth. Each spoke of drive, vision, hard work and preparation. Not one even implied the need or desire for preferential treatment.

In 1963, Whitney Young, then head of the Urban League, proposed a kind of “Marshall Plan” for blacks. One league member, however, objected to what he called “the heart of it — the business of employing Negroes (because they are Negroes).” Moreover, Whitney Young suggested his “Marshall Plan” for a period of 10 years. This means, if Young prevailed, affirmative action would have ended in 1973!

Lower college-graduation rates for blacks result from lower standards used in minority admissions to achieve campus “diversity.” This mismatching of students, placing someone in a major-league school when he or she would have performed better in a triple-A league, causes — according to one study — a loss of $5.3 billion a year to the black community. Moreover, affirmative action in higher education masked the real problem: substandard education in K-12. Yet you resist many changes urban parents want, including vouchers.

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