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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 76th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

 

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

3 Comments

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 75th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

Remembering Pearl Harbor

4 Comments

 

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 74th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

The 4 Worst Mistakes Of The Axis Powers During WWII

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This is from War History OnLine.

Looking back at WWII there have been 5 decisions made that, in the end,  did not work out to the Axis advantage. Of course you can argue that starting the war in the first place was the biggest mistake made. but, for the sake of the argument, let us look at 5 mistakes that were made after the war was started.

Nazi Alliance with Fascist Italy

Hitler_and_Mussolini_June_1940-595x445Mussolini and Hitler in the heady days of 1940 (Bundesarchiv)

Having allied themselves with Italy, although ideologically similar, was something that the Nazi’s should have forsaken. Time and again the Nazi’s were forced to come to the aid of Italy after the fascists launched an ill conceived invasion or bitten off more than they could chew.

Getting the German forces involved in North Africa, a costly side show, was bad enough but the forced German invasion of Greece could not have come at a worse time.

In March of 1941 Mussolini, the Fascist dictator of Italy, was still angry with Hitler after he failed to inform the Italians beforehand of his plans to invade France and the low countries. This made Mussolini decide he was going to surprise Hitler and invade Greece without telling him. The Italian advance quickly bogged down and after a few weeks the Greeks had fought them back to their starting point. The British came to the aid of the Greeks and landed forces in, what Churchill always called, the soft underbelly of Europe.

This loss of face for the Axis powers could not be accepted by Hitler who ordered his generals to come up with a plan to secure his, now vulnerable, Southern flank. This meant that the Invasion of the Soviet union, that was supposed to be start in early spring, had to postponed to June 22nd. As it turned out, this delay proved fatal.

Nazi invasion of Russia

main_1200German troops on the move in Russian (Bundesarchiv)

Even though it was inconceivable that Nazi’s would not invade the Soviet Union, so was the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact which they signed on August 13th 1939. This non-aggression pact allowed Nazi Germany to invade Poland without having to worry about a possible war with the USSR. It even went so far that Poland was divided among the two and the part that the Soviets took in September 1939 has never been returned to Poland. It also gave the Soviets free reign in expanding its influence in the Eastern European countries and they lost no time in subjecting them to their rule.

The fact that the two sworn ideological enemies were willing to sign a non-aggression pact shook the world and allowed Nazi Germany the time to focus its attention on the west without having to fear a war on two fronts. Germany made the most of this freedom and, in quick succession, defeated Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Belgium and France. Only their planned invasion of the United Kingdom was thwarted by the Few of the Royal Air Force, the first setback for the Nazis. Deteriorating weather caused the invasion of Britain to be postponed indefinitely and Hitler once more turned to the East where, according to his book Mein Kampf, he believed the “Lebensraum” (living space) was which the Germans needed above all other things. However, this living space was occupied by the Russians which had now moved it’s western borders hundreds of kilometers closer to Nazi Germany as a result of the pact.

Unwilling to knock Britain out of the war first and thus faced with a war on two fronts, which Hitler had vowed to avoid at all costs, he invaded the Soviet Union. Hitler was confident the Soviet Union would be defeated in mere weeks and he is quoted as having said “We have only to kick in the door and the whole rotten structure will come crashing down”. However most of the first month, if not 6 weeks, was spent fighting a way through countries now occupied by the Soviet Union. These countries might otherwise have been ensnared into the Axis camp, as some were later to join, had it not been for the pact.

The extra territory gave the Soviets the ability to trade space for time and, with the extra delay caused by the invasion of Greece, meant that Nazi Germany could not complete it’s conquest in during the remaining period of good weather. The autumn rains rolled in and turned most of Russia in a quagmire of mud which made all movement virtually impossible. Then winter arrived early and with extreme cold for which the Germans were not equipped.

Attack on Pearl Harbor

Attack_on_Pearl_Harbor_Japanese_planes_viewPhotograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island shortly after the beginning of the Pearl Harbor attack.

A history similar to the German attack on the Soviet Union, the Japanese wanted an empire of their own in order to secure the future prosperity of a country which they thought did not have enough natural resources to sustain the population. The Germans called it “Lebensraum”, the Japanese the “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere”, it amounted to the same thing. Having occupied vast portions of China and a number of countries in East Asia the next step was to expand it’s empire east into the Pacific ocean. Their eye was on the prosperous and natural resources that were under the control of the British and Dutch empires and the American governed Philippines. However attacking these would cause the United States to join the war on the side of the allies.

America, on the other hand, had kept an eye on Japanese conquests and brutality and, short of war, did what they could to restrict them. In July 1941 they embargoed the export of oil to Japan which then calculated that, without acquiring the oil in the Dutch East Indies, they only had enough fuel for two years. They reasoned that now there would be no other option than going to war.

Realizing that they could not defeat the USA in direct battle they chose to deliver a crushing blow to the American fleet based at Pearl Harbor. This would give them time to complete their desired conquests and present the Americans with a “fait accompli”. They reasoned the Americans would not be willing to enter a protracted war with Japan and they would be able to make peace, keeping their vital conquests and handing back the less desirable places.

Fate, or bad Japanese intelligence, intervened on the Allied side on December 7th 1941 and the vital American Aircraft carriers were not in port when the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor. This meant the Americans were able to fight back causing the Japanese Admiral in charge of the attack to say (supposedly) “I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.”.

No alliance between the Nazis, Spain and Turkey

WWII_Europe_1941-1942_Map_EN

One look on the map of Europe will show the strategic importance of both Spain and Turkey, however these two, were two of the few countries on the European mainland that remained neutral during the second world war.

Even though Spain remained neutral during the First World War it was expected they would come in on the side of the Axis after all the help Hitler had given General Franco in the Spanish Civil war. However, despite pleading and perhaps even begging, Franco remained adamant. He would not join the Axis and would not even allow the Germans to pass through his country (as the Swedes did).

Not being able to pass through Spain meant that Great Britain was secure in using it’s military base in Gibraltar. This not only effectively sealed off the entrance to the Mediterranean from Atlantic ocean for the German Navy, it also gave the British a location from which it could support Malta and Egypt. Possession of Malta meant the British could interdict shipping from Italy to North Africa. Possession of Egypt meant it could stop the Axis from linking up with their forces fighting in the Caucasus (Soviet Union) and taking the much needed oil fields in the middle east.

Turkey fought on the side of the Axis in the First World War yet declined to join them in the Second. This, again, meant the Germans could not link up with their forces in the Caucasus making the capture of Egypt paramount. In February 1945, Turkey joined the allies and declared war on, a virtually defeated Nazi Germany.

The 4 Worst Mistakes Of The Axis Powers During WWII

1 Comment

This is from War History OnLine.

Looking back at WWII there have been 5 decisions made that, in the end,  did not work out to the Axis advantage. Of course you can argue that starting the war in the first place was the biggest mistake made. but, for the sake of the argument, let us look at 5 mistakes that were made after the war was started.

Nazi Alliance with Fascist Italy
Hitler_and_Mussolini_June_1940-595x445

Mussolini and Hitler in the heady days of 1940 (Bundesarchiv)

Having allied themselves with Italy, although ideologically similar, was something that the Nazi’s should have forsaken. Time and again the Nazi’s were forced to come to the aid of Italy after the fascists launched an ill conceived invasion or bitten off more than they could chew.

Getting the German forces involved in North Africa, a costly side show, was bad enough but the forced German invasion of Greece could not have come at a worse time.

In March of 1941 Mussolini, the Fascist dictator of Italy, was still angry with Hitler after he failed to inform the Italians beforehand of his plans to invade France and the low countries. This made Mussolini decide he was going to surprise Hitler and invade Greece without telling him. The Italian advance quickly bogged down and after a few weeks the Greeks had fought them back to their starting point. The British came to the aid of the Greeks and landed forces in, what Churchill always called, the soft underbelly of Europe.

This loss of face for the Axis powers could not be accepted by Hitler who ordered his generals to come up with a plan to secure his, now vulnerable, Southern flank. This meant that the Invasion of the Soviet union, that was supposed to be start in early spring, had to postponed to June 22nd. As it turned out, this delay proved fatal.

Nazi invasion of Russia

main_1200German troops on the move in Russian (Bundesarchiv)

Even though it was inconceivable that Nazi’s would not invade the Soviet Union, so was the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact which they signed on August 13th 1939. This non-aggression pact allowed Nazi Germany to invade Poland without having to worry about a possible war with the USSR. It even went so far that Poland was divided among the two and the part that the Soviets took in September 1939 has never been returned to Poland. It also gave the Soviets free reign in expanding its influence in the Eastern European countries and they lost no time in subjecting them to their rule.

The fact that the two sworn ideological enemies were willing to sign a non-aggression pact shook the world and allowed Nazi Germany the time to focus its attention on the west without having to fear a war on two fronts. Germany made the most of this freedom and, in quick succession, defeated Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Belgium and France. Only their planned invasion of the United Kingdom was thwarted by the Few of the Royal Air Force, the first setback for the Nazis. Deteriorating weather caused the invasion of Britain to be postponed indefinitely and Hitler once more turned to the East where, according to his book Mein Kampf, he believed the “Lebensraum” (living space) was which the Germans needed above all other things. However, this living space was occupied by the Russians which had now moved it’s western borders hundreds of kilometers closer to Nazi Germany as a result of the pact.

Unwilling to knock Britain out of the war first and thus faced with a war on two fronts, which Hitler had vowed to avoid at all costs, he invaded the Soviet Union. Hitler was confident the Soviet Union would be defeated in mere weeks and he is quoted as having said “We have only to kick in the door and the whole rotten structure will come crashing down”. However most of the first month, if not 6 weeks, was spent fighting a way through countries now occupied by the Soviet Union. These countries might otherwise have been ensnared into the Axis camp, as some were later to join, had it not been for the pact.

The extra territory gave the Soviets the ability to trade space for time and, with the extra delay caused by the invasion of Greece, meant that Nazi Germany could not complete it’s conquest in during the remaining period of good weather. The autumn rains rolled in and turned most of Russia in a quagmire of mud which made all movement virtually impossible. Then winter arrived early and with extreme cold for which the Germans were not equipped.

Attack on Pearl Harbor

Attack_on_Pearl_Harbor_Japanese_planes_viewPhotograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island shortly after the beginning of the Pearl Harbor attack.

A history similar to the German attack on the Soviet Union, the Japanese wanted an empire of their own in order to secure the future prosperity of a country which they thought did not have enough natural resources to sustain the population. The Germans called it “Lebensraum”, the Japanese the “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere”, it amounted to the same thing. Having occupied vast portions of China and a number of countries in East Asia the next step was to expand it’s empire east into the Pacific ocean. Their eye was on the prosperous and natural resources that were under the control of the British and Dutch empires and the American governed Philippines. However attacking these would cause the United States to join the war on the side of the allies.

America, on the other hand, had kept an eye on Japanese conquests and brutality and, short of war, did what they could to restrict them. In July 1941 they embargoed the export of oil to Japan which then calculated that, without acquiring the oil in the Dutch East Indies, they only had enough fuel for two years. They reasoned that now there would be no other option than going to war.

Realizing that they could not defeat the USA in direct battle they chose to deliver a crushing blow to the American fleet based at Pearl Harbor. This would give them time to complete their desired conquests and present the Americans with a “fait accompli”. They reasoned the Americans would not be willing to enter a protracted war with Japan and they would be able to make peace, keeping their vital conquests and handing back the less desirable places.

Fate, or bad Japanese intelligence, intervened on the Allied side on December 7th 1941 and the vital American Aircraft carriers were not in port when the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor. This meant the Americans were able to fight back causing the Japanese Admiral in charge of the attack to say (supposedly) “I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.”.

No alliance between the Nazis, Spain and Turkey

WWII_Europe_1941-1942_Map_EN

One look on the map of Europe will show the strategic importance of both Spain and Turkey, however these two, were two of the few countries on the European mainland that remained neutral during the second world war.

ven though Spain remained neutral during the First World War it was expected they would come in on the side of the Axis after all the help Hitler had given General Franco in the Spanish Civil war. However, despite pleading and perhaps even begging, Franco remained adamant. He would not join the Axis and would not even allow the Germans to pass through his country (as the Swedes did).

Not being able to pass through Spain meant that Great Britain was secure in using it’s military base in Gibraltar. This not only effectively sealed off the entrance to the Mediterranean from Atlantic ocean for the German Navy, it also gave the British a location from which it could support Malta and Egypt. Possession of Malta meant the British could interdict shipping from Italy to North Africa. Possession of Egypt meant it could stop the Axis from linking up with their forces fighting in the Caucasus (Soviet Union) and taking the much needed oil fields in the middle east.

Turkey fought on the side of the Axis in the First World War yet declined to join them in the Second. This, again, meant the Germans could not link up with their forces in the Caucasus making the capture of Egypt paramount. In February 1945, Turkey joined the allies and declared war on, a virtually defeated Nazi Germany.

10 RARE AND UNSEEN PICS AFTER PEARL HARBOR

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This is from Breitbarts Big Peace.

While clicking other links I found these pictures.

 

Exactly 72 years ago today, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the U.S. naval base in Hawaii–a “date which will live in infamy,” in the words of President Franklin Roosevelt. In fact, that Sunday morning is so seared into America‘s memory that the tumult of the weeks and months afterward is often overlooked. Here, on the 72nd anniversary of Pearl Harbor, LIFE.com presents rare and unpublished photos from Hawaii and the mainland, chronicling a nation’s answer to an unprecedented act of war.

 

Unpublished, a rally at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Dec. 1941. 

The Brooklyn Navy Yard was founded in 1801. It had contributed ships to every American conflict, including the War of 1812, the Civil War, and World War I. It would prove absolutely essential to the war effort during World War II.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, young defenders beside a mounted machine gun, Hawaii, Dec. 1941.

“Close observers of Japan,” LIFE noted in mid-1941, “have said for years that if that country ever found itself in a hopeless corner it was capable of committing national hara-kiri by flinging itself at the throat of its mightiest enemy … [On December 7] it took the desperate plunge and told its enemies in effect: “If this be hara-kiri, make the most of it.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, Vice Admiral Joseph “Bull” Reeves, Waikiki Beach, Dec. 1941. 

While the U.S. was stunned by the attack on Pearl Harbor, the nation’s political and military leaders had long been conscious of tensions with Japan — which was obviously gearing up for war long before December 1941. An example of the measures the U.S. took in expectation of some sort of conflict in the Pacific: Joseph “Bull” Reeves, retired since 1936, was recalled to active duty in 1940. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, he was already 69.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, Pearl Harbor, Dec. 1941.

At the time of the attack, there were roughly 50,000 troops based at Pearl Harbor. Afterwards the number of soldiers spiked, as there were several hundred thousand of them stationed in Hawaii by 1945. (The number dropped to less than 70,000 by 1946.) “Out of the Pacific skies last week,” LIFE magazine wrote in its December 15, 1941 issue, “World War II came with startling suddenness to America … With reckless daring Japan aimed this blow at the citadel of American power in the Pacific.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, training with gas masks in Hawaii, early 1942.

“Ambassador Nomura and Envoy Kurusu,” LIFE reported in mid-December 1941, “had come with the answer to Hull’s note [of protest to the Japanese delegation in D.C.]. Hull read it through and then, for the first time in many long, patient years, the soft-spoken Secretary lost his temper. Into the teeth of the two Japanese, who for once did not grin, he flung these words: “In all my 50 years of public service I have never seen a document that was more crowded with infamous falsehoods and distortions — on a scale so huge that I never imagined until today that any government on this planet was capable of uttering them.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, troops shore up defenses in Hawaii in the weeks after Pearl Harbor. 

World War II lasted four more years — until Germany surrendered in May of 1945 and Japan surrendered in September of that year, in the wake of America’s destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The attack on Pearl Harbor, meanwhile — rather than Japan’s greatest victory — turned out to be an act of belligerent folly that, in many ways, guaranteed Japan’s eventual defeat.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

No Job Too Small — Dec. 1942

A Naval officer — dwarfed by the vessel in his view — gazes at a cruiser’s propeller at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. During the course of World War II, more than 5,000 Allied ships were brought to Brooklyn for repairs.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, a poster at the Brooklyn Navy Yard calls for vigilance, Dec. 1941.

Within days of the attack, while the eyes of America were understandably focused on Pearl Harbor and the Pacific, a naval yard in New York City was already ramping up for what looked to be a long, long war.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

A closer look at the USS Arizona‘s wreckage, 1942.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 


“U.S. aircraft rose at once to repel the Japanese attack,” LIFE wrote in December 1941, overstating the efficacy of the American response to the assault. In fact, more than 2,400 Americans (including scores of civilians) were killed in the attack; hundreds of U.S. aircraft were destroyed. In contrast, fewer than 70 Japanese were killed. The American response to the massive, sudden attack was unquestionably stalwart; but there’s also little question that, in terms of sheer losses, America endured a hellish blow.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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