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For Christ’s sake men—come on! Do you want to live forever?” Mowed down a 200-man attack by himself with a machine gun.

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This is from War History OnLine.

  Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph “Dan” Daly was an incredible man.

He had a very large solid brass pair.       

DanDaly_MedailleMilitaire

Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph “Dan” Daly was a United States Marine and one of only nineteen men (including seven Marines) to have received the Medal of Honor twice. Of the Marines who are double recipients, only Daly and Major General Smedley Butler received their Medals of Honor in two, separate conflicts.

 Daly is said to have yelled, “Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever?” to the men in his company prior to charging the Germans during the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I.

Major General Butler described Daly as, “The fightin’est Marine I ever knew!” Daly reportedly was offered an officer’s commission twice to which he responded that he would rather be, “…an outstanding sergeant than just another officer.”

The Medals of Honor are on display at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Triangle, Virginia.

Hoping to participate in the Spanish–American War, he enlisted in the Marine Corps on January 10, 1899, and received his initial training at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. But the war ended before he finished training.In 1900, during the Boxer Rebellion in China, he received his first Medal of Honor for single-handedly defending his position against repeated attacks and inflicted casualties of around 200 on the attacking Boxers.

His second Medal of Honor came fifteen years later, when he was fighting with US forces supporting the government in Haiti against rebels. On the night of October 24, 1915, in the Battle of Fort Dipitie he was part of a group of 35-41 Marines who were ambushed by a force of approximately 400 Cacos (Haitian insurgents). He led one of the three groups of men during the fight to reach a nearby fort, and was awarded the medal for his conspicuous actions.

He was awarded the Navy Cross for “repeated deeds of heroism and great service” during the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I. Daly retired on February 6, 1929.

Death and burial

Daly is buried at Cypress Hills National Cemetery in New York City. Daly died on April 27, 1937. He is buried at Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Section 5, Grave No. 70.

“Do you want to live forever?” quote
Daly is popularly attributed in Marine Corps lore as yelling, “Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever?” to his men during the Battle of Belleau Wood. Daly later told a Marine Corps historian that his words were “For Christ’s sake men—come on! Do you want to live forever?” The Chicago Tribune correspondent Floyd Gibbons, who was at Belleau Wood, reported hearing the words in his 1918 memoir And They Thought We Wouldn’t Fight, which he attributed to an unnamed gunnery sergeant (Daly was a first sergeant at the time). Gibbons was attached to elements of Major Benjamin S. Berry’s battalion (3rd Battalion 5th Marines) during the battle, but Daly was the first sergeant of the 73rd Machine Gun Company, a part of 3rd Battalion 6th Marines under the command of Major Berton W. Sibley. Sibley’s battalion attacked south of Berry’s and were on the outskirts of Lucy-le-Bocage when Daly made the cry. Additionally, 6th Marines commander Colonel Albertus W. Catlin implied in his memoir that the yell came from an unnamed sergeant in Berry’s battalion.

An earlier use of a similar phrase is attributed to Frederick the Great: “Lads, do you want to live forever?” (German: Kerle, wollt ihr ewig leben?), addressing retreating Prussian troops at the 1757 Battle of Kolín.

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Decorations and honors

A Fletcher-class destroyer USS Daly (DD-519) was named in honor of Daly and was commissioned on 10 March 1943. On November 10, 2005, the United States Postal Service issued its Distinguished Marines stamps in which Daly was honored, along with three other Marine Corps heroes. Besides Daly, these stamps honored John Basilone, John A. Lejeune, and Chesty Puller.

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Medals
Daly’s decorations and medals includes two Medals of Honor; the Navy Cross; Distinguished Service Cross; three Letters of Commendation; Good Conduct Medal with two bronze stars; China Relief Expedition Medal; Philippine Campaign Medal; Expeditionary Medal with one bronze star; Mexican Service Medal; Haitian Campaign Medal; World War I Victory Medal with Aisne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, and Defensive-Sector clasps and Citation Star; Médaille militaire; Croix de Guerre with Palm; and the Fourragère (the last three awards are from the French government; only the Croix de Guerre is authorized for wear by US personnel. A special exception is made for the 5th and 6th Marine Regiments, however. Those units are permitted to wear the Fourragere with their dress uniforms).

2nd award always stands as separate ribbon
Bronze starBronze star
Bronze star
Gold star
Fourragère CG.png
Medal of Honor (first award) Medal of Honor (second award)
Navy Cross Distinguished Service Cross Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal
with 2 service stars
China Relief Expedition Medal Philippine Campaign Medal Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal
with 1 service star Mexican Service Medal
Haitian Campaign Medal World War I Victory Medal
with Aisne, St. Mihiel,
Meuse-Argonne, and
Defensive-Sector clasps,
and Citation Star Médaille militaire Croix de Guerre
with Palm
Croix de Guerre Fourragère
Medal of Honor
First award — 1901
Awarded for actions during the China Relief

General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 55 (July 19, 1901)

Action Date: 14-Aug-00

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Private

Battalion: Captain Newt Hall’s Marine Detachment

Regiment: 1st Regiment (Marines)

Citation: The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor (First Award) to Private Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with the Captain Newt Hall’s Marine Detachment, 1st Regiment (Marines), in action in the presence of the enemy during the battle of Peking, China, 14 August 1900, Daly distinguished himself by meritorious conduct.

Second award — 1915
Awarded for actions during the U.S. Invasion and Occupation of Haiti

Action Date: 24-Oct-15

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: Gunnery Sergeant

Company: 15th Company (Mounted)

Regiment: 2d Marines

Citation:The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor (Second Award) to Gunnery Sergeant Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the 15th Company of Marines (Mounted), 2d Marine Regiment, on 22 October 1915. Gunnery Sergeant Daly was one of the company to leave Fort Liberte, Haiti, for a six-day reconnaissance. After dark on the evening of 24 October, while crossing the river in a deep ravine, the detachment was suddenly fired upon from three sides by about 400 Cacos concealed in bushes about 100 yards from the fort. The Marine detachment fought its way forward to a good position, which it maintained during the night, although subjected to a continuous fire from the Cacos. At daybreak the Marines, in three squads, advanced in three different directions, surprising and scattering the Cacos in all directions. Gunnery Sergeant Daly fought with exceptional gallantry against heavy odds throughout this action.

Distinguished Service Cross
Awarded for actions during the World War I

General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 101 (1918)

Action Date: June 5, 7, & 10, 1918

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: First Sergeant

Company: 73d Company

Regiment: 6th Regiment (Marines)

Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Citation: The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Sergeant Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, for repeated deeds of heroism and great service while serving with the Seventy-Third Company, Sixth Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F., on 5 June and 7, 1918 at Lucy-le-Bocage, and on 10 June 1918 in the attack on Bouresches, France. On June 5th, at the risk of his life, First Sergeant Daly extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump at Lucy-le-Bocage. On 7 June 1918, while his position was under violent bombardment, he visited all the gun crews of his company, then posted over a wide portion of the front, to cheer his men. On 10 June 1918, he attacked an enemy machine-gun emplacement unassisted and captured it by use of hand grenades and his automatic pistol. On the same day, during the German attack on Bouresches, he brought in wounded under fire.

Navy Cross
Awarded for actions during the World War I

Action Date: June 5, 7, & 10, 1918

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: First Sergeant

Company: 73d Company

Regiment: 6th Regiment (Marines)

Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Citation: The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to First Sergeant Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, for repeated deeds of heroism and great service while serving with the 73d Company, 6th Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F., on June 5 and 7, 1918 at Lucy-le-Bocage, and on 10 June 1918 in the attack on Bouresches, France. On June 5th, at the risk of his life, First Sergeant Daly extinguished a fire in an ammunition dump at Lucy-le-Bocage. On 7 June 1918, while his position was under violent bombardment, he visited all the gun crews of his company, then posted over a wide portion of the front, to cheer his men. On 10 June 1918, he attacked an enemy machine-gun emplacement unassisted and captured it by use of hand grenades and his automatic pistol. On the same day, during the German attack on Bouresches, he brought in wounded under fire.

Silver Star citation
Awarded for actions during the World War I

General Orders: Citation Orders, 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Action Date: June 6 – July 10, 1918

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: First Sergeant

Company: Machine Gun Company

Regiment: 6th Regiment (Marines)

Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Citation: By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved July 9, 1918 (Bul. No. 43, W.D., 1918), First Sergeant Daniel Joseph Daly (MCSN: 73086), United States Marine Corps, is cited by the Commanding General, SECOND Division, American Expeditionary Forces, for gallantry in action and a silver star may be placed upon the ribbon of the Victory Medals awarded him. First Sergeant Daly distinguished himself while serving with Machine Gun Company, Sixth Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces at Chateau-Thierry, France, 6 June – 10 July 1918.

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10 RARE AND UNSEEN PICS AFTER PEARL HARBOR

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This is from Breitbarts Big Peace.

While clicking other links I found these pictures.

 

Exactly 72 years ago today, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the U.S. naval base in Hawaii–a “date which will live in infamy,” in the words of President Franklin Roosevelt. In fact, that Sunday morning is so seared into America‘s memory that the tumult of the weeks and months afterward is often overlooked. Here, on the 72nd anniversary of Pearl Harbor, LIFE.com presents rare and unpublished photos from Hawaii and the mainland, chronicling a nation’s answer to an unprecedented act of war.

 

Unpublished, a rally at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Dec. 1941. 

The Brooklyn Navy Yard was founded in 1801. It had contributed ships to every American conflict, including the War of 1812, the Civil War, and World War I. It would prove absolutely essential to the war effort during World War II.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, young defenders beside a mounted machine gun, Hawaii, Dec. 1941.

“Close observers of Japan,” LIFE noted in mid-1941, “have said for years that if that country ever found itself in a hopeless corner it was capable of committing national hara-kiri by flinging itself at the throat of its mightiest enemy … [On December 7] it took the desperate plunge and told its enemies in effect: “If this be hara-kiri, make the most of it.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, Vice Admiral Joseph “Bull” Reeves, Waikiki Beach, Dec. 1941. 

While the U.S. was stunned by the attack on Pearl Harbor, the nation’s political and military leaders had long been conscious of tensions with Japan — which was obviously gearing up for war long before December 1941. An example of the measures the U.S. took in expectation of some sort of conflict in the Pacific: Joseph “Bull” Reeves, retired since 1936, was recalled to active duty in 1940. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, he was already 69.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, Pearl Harbor, Dec. 1941.

At the time of the attack, there were roughly 50,000 troops based at Pearl Harbor. Afterwards the number of soldiers spiked, as there were several hundred thousand of them stationed in Hawaii by 1945. (The number dropped to less than 70,000 by 1946.) “Out of the Pacific skies last week,” LIFE magazine wrote in its December 15, 1941 issue, “World War II came with startling suddenness to America … With reckless daring Japan aimed this blow at the citadel of American power in the Pacific.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, training with gas masks in Hawaii, early 1942.

“Ambassador Nomura and Envoy Kurusu,” LIFE reported in mid-December 1941, “had come with the answer to Hull’s note [of protest to the Japanese delegation in D.C.]. Hull read it through and then, for the first time in many long, patient years, the soft-spoken Secretary lost his temper. Into the teeth of the two Japanese, who for once did not grin, he flung these words: “In all my 50 years of public service I have never seen a document that was more crowded with infamous falsehoods and distortions — on a scale so huge that I never imagined until today that any government on this planet was capable of uttering them.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, troops shore up defenses in Hawaii in the weeks after Pearl Harbor. 

World War II lasted four more years — until Germany surrendered in May of 1945 and Japan surrendered in September of that year, in the wake of America’s destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The attack on Pearl Harbor, meanwhile — rather than Japan’s greatest victory — turned out to be an act of belligerent folly that, in many ways, guaranteed Japan’s eventual defeat.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

No Job Too Small — Dec. 1942

A Naval officer — dwarfed by the vessel in his view — gazes at a cruiser’s propeller at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. During the course of World War II, more than 5,000 Allied ships were brought to Brooklyn for repairs.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, a poster at the Brooklyn Navy Yard calls for vigilance, Dec. 1941.

Within days of the attack, while the eyes of America were understandably focused on Pearl Harbor and the Pacific, a naval yard in New York City was already ramping up for what looked to be a long, long war.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

A closer look at the USS Arizona‘s wreckage, 1942.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 


“U.S. aircraft rose at once to repel the Japanese attack,” LIFE wrote in December 1941, overstating the efficacy of the American response to the assault. In fact, more than 2,400 Americans (including scores of civilians) were killed in the attack; hundreds of U.S. aircraft were destroyed. In contrast, fewer than 70 Japanese were killed. The American response to the massive, sudden attack was unquestionably stalwart; but there’s also little question that, in terms of sheer losses, America endured a hellish blow.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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