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Legend of the tabby cat

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This is from Reining Cats.

This is the version Paul Harvey would broadcast each

year around Christmas.

As a cat owner, I always looked forward to Paul’s broadcast.

IF you look at the cat in the picture you can see the letter M.

Legend of the tabby cat

Author Unknown

And so it came to pass that a husband and wife journeyed to a small town called Bethlehem, as the king had decreed that all the people stand to be counted in the small towns and teeming cities from whence they came. The journey was long and hard for both, but especially for the young wife, who was very near to bringing her firstborn son into the world.

When they at last reached the crowded and noisy town, the expectant father searched hurriedly for a place for them to rest and where the child could safely be born. But at every door, he was told there was no available room. Finally, an old inkeeper, though having no space left in his inn, took pity on them and offered them shelter in the small stable used by his animals.

It was there that the child was born, surrounded by beasts of the field. As the night’s cold grew, the baby fretted and cried while his parents pondered how to make him comfortable. His father tried stuffing straw into the open places in the walls, and his mother tried warming him with her meager wrappings. But still, the baby cried on.

All the while, a tiny kitten watched from the corner. “Of course the little baby is cold,” she thought. “It has no fur to keep it warm! I will give it mine, and I will lullaby-purr it to sleep.”

A little jump brought the kitten into the manger where the baby lay. There, she quietly gave her humble gift of warmth and love, gently stretching out her thin, fragile little body over the baby’s, careful to cover all but the infant’s face. The crying was soon replaced by soft purrs and coos, and slowly, the infant smiled.

As Mary, the new mother, witnessed this gift to her child, she touched the little cat’s forehead.

“Thank you, Little Tabby, for your gift of love and warmth. As a sign of my grateful blessing, you and all your descendents will forevermore carry my initial on your forehead.”

And to this day, tabby cats are known by the remarkable “M” on their foreheads, and by their extraordinary gifts of love, so gently given.

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Legend of the tabby cat

Leave a comment

This is from Reining Cats.

This is the version Paul Harvey would broadcast each

year around Christmas.

As a cat owner, I always looked forward to Paul’s broadcast.

IF you look at the cat in the picture you can see the letter M.

th

Legend of the tabby cat

Author Unknown

And so it came to pass that a husband and wife journeyed to a small town called Bethlehem, as the king had decreed that all the people stand to be counted in the small towns and teeming cities from whence they came. The journey was long and hard for both, but especially for the young wife, who was very near to bringing her firstborn son into the world.

When they at last reached the crowded and noisy town, the expectant father searched hurriedly for a place for them to rest and where the child could safely be born. But at every door, he was told there was no available room. Finally, an old inkeeper, though having no space left in his inn, took pity on them and offered them shelter in the small stable used by his animals.

It was there that the child was born, surrounded by beasts of the field. As the night’s cold grew, the baby fretted and cried while his parents pondered how to make him comfortable. His father tried stuffing straw into the open places in the walls, and his mother tried warming him with her meager wrappings. But still, the baby cried on.

All the while, a tiny kitten watched from the corner. “Of course the little baby is cold,” she thought. “It has no fur to keep it warm! I will give it mine, and I will lullaby-purr it to sleep.”

A little jump brought the kitten into the manger where the baby lay. There, she quietly gave her humble gift of warmth and love, gently stretching out her thin, fragile little body over the baby’s, careful to cover all but the infant’s face. The crying was soon replaced by soft purrs and coos, and slowly, the infant smiled.

As Mary, the new mother, witnessed this gift to her child, she touched the little cat’s forehead.

“Thank you, Little Tabby, for your gift of love and warmth. As a sign of my grateful blessing, you and all your descendents will forevermore carry my initial on your forehead.”

And to this day, tabby cats are known by the remarkable “M” on their foreheads, and by their extraordinary gifts of love, so gently given.

Legend Of Robin

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This is from The World Of Christmas.net.

 

I have heard a different version of the Robin’s breast became red.

I heard the Robin used its breast to wipe Jesus‘ brow at the crucifixion.

The little red-breasted, cheerful robins, often called the Christmas robins, indicate the season of sun and spring. This, rather ordinary, dull brown bird holds such tremendous importance to Christmas that the legend of the robin is unknown to none.
Robins are known for having shared the holy stable of Bethlehem, with Jesus’ family, when the other animals chose not to respond to Mary’s constant appeals for company.
It is believed that this bird used its soft, yet strong, breast feathers to re-ignite a fire from vanishing sparks so that baby Jesus could stay warm.
Apparently, while working up the dying fire, the robin got too close to the fire and burnt his breast feathers. The red breasts of robins are thus associated to the self-less service they provided. These colorful birds are regarded as the traditional symbol of UK and can often be found patterned on greeting cards and gift wrappers.
The Story Of The Christmas Robin
The Christmas night was extremely cold and a cold breeze blew constantly into the stable where Mother Mary lay with her infant, Jesus. The fire in the stable, the only source of heat for the baby, was about to go off and all that Mary could do was call the surrounding animals for help.
She asked the sleeping ox, lazy donkey, horse and the sheep, but they were either of no use or just refused to help. Suddenly, Mary heard the flapping sound of wings.
A robin had heard Mother Mary’s cry for help and had flown to the stable to help her out. The robin flapped his wings hard at the dying embers of fire until the fire was rekindled and became bright red. He fanned continuously, flapping hard so that the fire never went out and kept the baby warm.
To ensure that the fire stayed alive, the robin used his beak and dropped some dry sticks in the fire. This caused the fire to rise abruptly and it burnt the breast of the bird.
Despite the burns that he received, the bird didn’t bother and continued fanning so that the infant could be kept warm for long enough to sleep comfortably.
Mother Mary heartily thanked the robin for his efforts and tenderly looked at his breast that was now red with the burns and blessing him for his deed of valor and selflessness.Facts

  • The American male robin has a darker shade of red on its breast when compared to the female. This makes it easy to distinguish between the two.
  • The European robin is regarded as the National Bird of Britain.
  • The robin is closely associated with Christmas and is called the ‘Christmas Robin’.
  • The American robin is also known as robin redbreast; so is the European robin.

Legend of the tabby cat

Leave a comment

This is from Reining Cats.

This is the version Paul Harvey would broadcast each

year around Christmas.

As a cat owner, I always looked forward to Paul’s broadcast.

If you look at the cat’s head you can see the letter M.

th

Legend of the tabby cat

Author Unknown

And so it came to pass that a husband and wife journeyed to a small town called Bethlehem, as the king had decreed that all the people stand to be counted in the small towns and teeming cities from whence they came. The journey was long and hard for both, but especially for the young wife, who was very near to bringing her firstborn son into the world.

When they at last reached the crowded and noisy town, the expectant father searched hurriedly for a place for them to rest and where the child could safely be born. But at every door, he was told there was no available room. Finally, an old inkeeper, though having no space left in his inn, took pity on them and offered them shelter in the small stable used by his animals.

It was there that the child was born, surrounded by beasts of the field. As the night’s cold grew, the baby fretted and cried while his parents pondered how to make him comfortable. His father tried stuffing straw into the open places in the walls, and his mother tried warming him with her meager wrappings. But still, the baby cried on.

All the while, a tiny kitten watched from the corner. “Of course the little baby is cold,” she thought. “It has no fur to keep it warm! I will give it mine, and I will lullaby-purr it to sleep.”

A little jump brought the kitten into the manger where the baby lay. There, she quietly gave her humble gift of warmth and love, gently stretching out her thin, fragile little body over the baby’s, careful to cover all but the infant’s face. The crying was soon replaced by soft purrs and coos, and slowly, the infant smiled.

As Mary, the new mother, witnessed this gift to her child, she touched the little cat’s forehead.

“Thank you, Little Tabby, for your gift of love and warmth. As a sign of my grateful blessing, you and all your descendents will forevermore carry my initial on your forehead.”

And to this day, tabby cats are known by the remarkable “M” on their foreheads, and by their extraordinary gifts of love, so gently given.

Legend of the tabby cat

Leave a comment

This is from Reining Cats.

This is the version Paul Harvey would broadcast each

year around Christmas.

As a cat owner, I always looked forward to Paul’s broadcast.

 

Legend of the tabby cat

Author Unknown

And so it came to pass that a husband and wife journeyed to a small town called Bethlehem, as the king had decreed that all the people stand to be counted in the small towns and teeming cities from whence they came.

The journey was long and hard for both, but especially for the young wife, who was very near to bringing her firstborn son into the world.

When they at last reached the crowded and noisy town, the expectant father searched hurriedly for a place for them to rest and where the child could safely be born.

But at every door, he was told there was no available room. Finally, an old inkeeper, though having no space left in his inn, took pity on them and offered them shelter in the small stable used by his animals.

It was there that the child was born, surrounded by beasts of the field. As the night’s cold grew, the baby fretted and cried while his parents pondered how to make him comfortable.

His father tried stuffing straw into the open places in the walls, and his mother tried warming him with her meager wrappings. But still, the baby cried on.

All the while, a tiny kitten watched from the corner. “Of course the little baby is cold,” she thought. “It has no fur to keep it warm! I will give it mine, and I will lullaby-purr it to sleep.”

A little jump brought the kitten into the manger where the baby lay. There, she quietly gave her humble gift of warmth and love, gently stretching out her thin, fragile little body over the baby’s, careful to cover all but the infant’s face.

The crying was soon replaced by soft purrs and coos, and slowly, the infant smiled.

As Mary, the new mother, witnessed this gift to her child, she touched the little cat’s forehead.

“Thank you, Little Tabby, for your gift of love and warmth. As a sign of my grateful blessing, you and all your descendents will forevermore carry my initial on your forehead.”

And to this day, tabby cats are known by the remarkable “M” on their foreheads, and by their extraordinary gifts of love, so gently given.

Santa Claus

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This is from The World of Christmas.net.

Here are some of the names of Santa Claus or Father Christmas.

Santa Claus is one of the most famous characters that is loved by children all over the world. He is known for giving gifts to good kids on Christmas Eve.
He is also known as Saint Nicholas, Saint Nick, Father Christmas, Kriss Kringle, Santy or simply Santa.
In many countries, kids, especially ‘in spirit’, believe Father Christmas as being real.
Other names by which Father Christmas is known in other countries are:
  • Afghanistan – Baba Chaghaloo
  • Armenia – Gaghant Baba
  • Brazil – Papai Noel
  • Czech Republic – Ježíšek
  • Denmark – Julemanden
  • France and French Canada – Le Père Noël
  • Germany – Weihnachtsmann
  • Iraq and South Africa – Goosaleh
  • Ireland & Scottish Highlands – Daidí na Nollag
  • Italy – Babbo Natale
  • Portugal – Pai Natal
  • Romania – Mos Craciun
  • Spain and Mexico – Papá Noel
  • Netherlands and Belgium – Sinterklaas
Saint Nicholas or Kriss Kringle was a historical figure, believed to be the kind bishop of Turkey.
He used to give presents to the needy, poor and good kids, just to make them smile. Thus, he became the subject of many folktales and mythical fantasies.
With time, his image changes to the modern version of Santa Claus with a long white beard, red robes and red bonnet with white trimmings, a big round belly and a kindly cheerful smile on his face and sparkling eyes.
He is believed to live at North Pole or Lapland in Finland along with his team of elves, reindeers and his wife, Mrs. Claus.
Together, they keep a record of all good children all over the world and give them the requested presents near Christmas time.
They make toys, cookies and even make miracles happen for them. With time, Santa became so popular that today he is used as a promotional tool for many shopping malls and stores during Christmas time to lure kids and their families.
Santa loves children who are kind and obedient to their elders.

Christmas Eve robber beaten, stripped of clothes

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This is from KTVU 2 San Franciso

A son of Obama tries to rob Head Honchos Hair Salon.

The employees opened a can of Whoop Ass on him then

the employees strip him they tossed him out the door.  

Corneilyus Howeth

 Ass Whooped Corneilyus Howeth

OKLAHOMA CITY, Calif.

Oklahoma City Police responded to an armed robbery call at Head Honchos hair salon around midnight on the morning of Christmas Eve.

Police arrested 23-year-old Corneilyus Howeth for robbery with a firearm. Howeth also had a prior felony arrest.

Howeth forced the employees of the salon inside, telling them to empty their pockets. But when another employee distracted him, the owner of the salon tackled Howeth.

The two fought for the gun for a short time before other employees stepped in and helped take the gun from Howeth.

The employees then stripped Howeth of his clothes to make sure he wasn’t hiding more weapons and threw him outside.

Police showed up shortly thereafter to take Howeth into custody.

 

Knockout: Victims of brutal Downtown Mall assault want arrests, and answers from police

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This is from Cville.com.

Are  Jeanne Doucette, and Marc Adams victims of racism against white people 

by the Charlottesville  Police Department?

Jeanna and Marc were attacked by three feral savage sons of Obama.

There are pictures of these feral savages.

Maybe the good people of Charlottesville need to  hunt these feral savages down.

 

A couple’s late night stroll on the Christmas-lit Downtown Mall turned to terror in the early morning hours of Friday, December 20, when they were brutally assaulted by three men in what appears to have been a random act of violence.

Even though one of the victims, Jeanne Doucette, managed to take photos that appear to show the assailants as they kicked and pummeled her boyfriend Marc Adams to unconsciousness, Charlottesville Police still do not have any suspects. Doucette says there were other witnesses to the crime, which allegedly occurred just outside the Wells Fargo building at around 1am as she and Adams walked from Miller’s to Rapture, and she is baffled as to why the police haven’t shared her images more widely with people who could have seen the suspects earlier in the evening.

“I cannot understand why they didn’t let people know what happened,” said Doucette, who still bore injuries from the assault when she met for an interview a week later. “Those pictures might have prompted some tips.”

The images she captured are blurry but nonetheless appear to corroborate her account of the night’s events, including the brutality of the beating, during which she says the assailants joked and laughed, even stopping to hug in the midst of the onslaught.

Doucette said the assault occurred after she and Adams, both 39, had met for a drink at Miller’s after Adams finished his shift as chef for a downtown food cart. They headed east up the Mall toward Rapture to end their night with music, when Adams tripped and fell in front of Derriere de Soie lingerie store, a block from Miller’s. As he was getting up, a man approached quickly, said something that Doucette couldn’t make out, and kicked Adams while he was on the ground, before being joined by his friends who beat Adams severely, breaking his ankle, cracking ribs and knocking out one of his teeth.

The grainy photos that Doucette took with her phone (posted below story) show the faces and clothing worn by the three alleged assailants, all black males. Doucette estimated the men were approximately  6’ tall and in their mid-20s or early 30s. In one photo, Adams is lying on his back on the Mall with a man looming over him. Doucette said the man was kicking Adams when she took the picture. In another picture, a large man in a black coat and light colored shirt appears to be moving towards Doucette’s camera as Adams is on his knees in the background.

While Doucette suffered bruising to her head and tearing of the cartilage in her ear, Adams bore the brunt of the men’s aggression, sustaining broken bones and a concussion that he said has robbed him of any memory of the incident and its immediate aftermath.

Flooded with fear and adrenaline, Doucette said, she reacted quickly after the assault began, confronting the first assailant.

“I came up and pushed him away and said, ‘What are you doing?’” she recalled.

The incident escalated when the man responded by striking her.

“The guy hits me repeatedly in the ear,” she said. “My earring was stabbing me in the head over and over.”

Two other men soon joined in the beating, Doucette said, and while they primarily focused on Adams, a local musician who at 5’5″ and 140 pounds was outsized and outnumbered, they would occasionally strike her.

“When he’d tell them to stop hitting me, they’d hit me twice,” said Doucette, who is 5’2″.

Doucette said she and Adams repeatedly tried to escape, but the assault continued east up the Mall and stopped in front of the Wells Fargo bank. Doucette said she threw her purse at the men, hoping that when they saw the cash inside they’d simply take the money and leave, but they had no apparent interest in robbing her. Instead, she said, they seemed to delight in the brutality.

“They were laughing, high-fiving, hugging, and then returning to kick him,” said Doucette. “There was some kind of camaraderie to it.”

The men were accompanied by a woman, who Doucette said repeatedly screamed at them to stop. The men ignored her pleas. Doucette said she had never seen the men before and there was nothing in her behavior or Adams’ that would have provoked the assault. Both victims wondered whether the episode was an example of the so-called “knock-out game,” in which assailants randomly strike an innocent passerby with the goal of rendering them unconscious. Several such assaults have resulted in the deaths of victims. Adams and Doucette checked Youtube for videos of their own assault in the days after it happened, but have found nothing. The cheerful demeanor of their attackers, however, has them wondering if they were targets of some kind of game.

“Maybe if we had played dead, they would have stopped,” said Adams. “If the point of the knockout game is to knock out, we kept getting up to help each other. We didn’t play right.”

Adams describes himself as a “passive person,” and while he said the head injury erased his memory of the attack, he doesn’t believe he could have said anything to provoke the men’s wrath.

“He’s the most non-confrontational person I know,” Doucette agreed.

The attack finally stopped after Doucette started taking pictures with her cell phone and several passersby appeared to be calling 911. By the time police arrived several minutes later, Doucette said, the assailants were gone. Adams, who had been briefly knocked unconscious, refused to be transported by ambulance to the hospital that night despite Doucette’s and emergency responders’ urgings. He also declined to be interviewed by police, although he called the next day to add his report to the information given to police by Doucette.

“My brain was messed up,” he said, repeating what Doucette has told him about his post-assault behavior. “I kept saying I wanted to go home.”

The next morning, Adams said, he did go to the hospital. In addition to the concussion and facial bruising including a black eye, x-rays confirmed his cracked ribs and fractured ankle. Nearly two weeks after the attack, the physical wounds are healing, but both Doucette and Adams are troubled by what they see as a lack of response from the Charlottesville Police Department.

“It’s like they don’t care,” said Doucette, who said she called police on December 29 to follow up on the investigation and was told that the case had been suspended due to a lack of information and had not been assigned to a detective. “I don’t understand why they couldn’t even have the courtesy to call and say we’re not even going to look for them,” she said.

According to CPD spokesperson Ronnie Roberts, investigators canvassed the Downtown area after the assault but did not find anyone matching the description of the alleged assailants. Police did not release Doucette’s pictures to the public, Roberts said, because they believed surveillance video from the bank might offer clearer images, and they hoped officers might recognize some of the men in Doucette’s photos without tipping them off that they were being sought.

Roberts said police requested the bank video on Friday, December 27, a week after the attack, and had not received it as of Sunday, December 29. On Sunday, Doucette finally posted the pictures she’d taken to her Facebook page and said she quickly received several tips that she has passed on to police. Her frustration at the lack of an investigation is palpable.

“I feel forgotten about,” Doucette said. “I feel like I’m not safe.”

 news-mallbeating2 One of three men allegedly involved in a December 20 assault. Photo: Jeanne Doucette

Feral Savges

news-mallbeating4news-mallbeating

                          Victim two on ground                                       Victim one

 

 

 

The Case for Christmas (Part 1)

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This is from Town Hall.

This is a very powerful article.

I have included Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Christmas address.

 

Lee Strobel earned a Master of Studies in Law degree from Yale Law School, became the award-winning legal editor of the Chicago Tribune and was a spiritual skeptic until 1981. I recently read his short 91-page booklet titled “The Case for Christmas,” in which he viewed the sacred holiday as an investigative journalist and interviewed scholars on the heart of its meaning. You can call his book “The Rationale, or Reason, in the Reason for the Season.”

 

Strobel explained in his Introduction, “Essentially, that’s what I did for a living as a Tribune reporter — investigate claims to see if they’re true, separate rumors from reality, and determine facts from fiction.”

As an atheist and crime reporter for The Tribune, Strobel first set out to disprove and discredit the Christ in Christmas, but ended up writing in favor of him in face of the compelling evidence. Strobel commendably allowed even his own bias to be confronted by his investigation.

Strobel’s historical examination led him to do research in four primary areas and proofs: the eyewitness evidence, the scientific evidence, the profile evidence and the fingerprint evidence. Behind each of those four proofs were these four questions:

— Can the biographies of Jesus (in the bible) be trusted?

— Does archaeology confirm or contradict Jesus’ biographies?

— Did Jesus fulfill the attributes of God?

— Did Jesus match the identity of the Messiah?

I recommend a complete reading of Strobel’s booklet because there’s so much more evidence in it to be examined and pondered. Nevertheless, I grabbed a few of the experts’ answers to those questions and highlighted them here in my Christmas column.

— Can the biographies of Jesus (in the bible) be trusted?

Craig Blomberg, who received his Ph.D. from Aberdeen University in Scotland and later served as senior research fellow at Cambridge University, is one of the foremost authorities in our country on Jesus’ biographies. In “The Case for Christmas,” Dr. Blomberg explained to Strobel that, as with some of the best works of antiquity, Jesus’ biographical accuracy is based upon eyewitnesses. The fact is two of the Gospels or accounts about Jesus (Matthew and John) were authored by first century eyewitnesses of his life. The other two Gospels (Mark and Luke) were written by men of high repute who compiled firsthand eyewitness evidence.

For example, there is turn-of-the-first century evidence that the Gospel of Mark recorded the Apostle Peter’s eyewitness testimony. In addition, the New Testament writer Luke, a physician and historian in that day, wrote in his prologue, “Many have undertaken to draw up an account of the things that have been fulfilled among us, just as they were handed down to us by those who from the first were eyewitnesses and servants of the word. With this in mind, since I myself have carefully investigated everything from the beginning, I too decided to write an orderly account for you … so that you may know the certainty of the things you have been taught.”

Dr. Blomberg explained to Strobel that it’s also very important to note that even liberal critics date all four accounts of Jesus’ life in the Bible within the first century A.D. And, as copies of those Gospels circulated around Israel and the Mediterranean world, there wasn’t a single person living at that time who wrote down any doubt of their content’s accuracy, even though a myriad of eyewitnesses of Jesus’ life and ministry were still alive in the first century.

— Does archaeology confirm or contradict Jesus’ biographies?

In this section of his booklet, Strobel shares about his interview with John McRay, Ph.D., who wrote the nearly 500-page book, “Archaeology and the New Testament.” McRay studied at Hebrew University, the Ecole Biblique Archeologique Francaise in Jerusalem, Vanderbilt University Divinity School, and the University of Chicago, from which he earned his doctorate.

Strobel posed the question to Dr. McRay: “Does archeology affirm or undermine the New Testament when it checks out the details in those accounts (about Jesus)?”

Strobel then explained that McRay didn’t flinch in his response: “Oh, there’s no question that the credibility of the New Testament is enhanced, just as credibility of any ancient document is enhanced when you excavate and find that the author was accurate in talking about a particular place or event.”

When the authors of the Gospels wrote about people, places and events, they wrote about historical realities that existed or occurred in real space and time in first century Palestine. Among those are the census that required Mary and Joseph to return to his town of Bethlehem and the archeological proof for Nazareth, which was once doubted to exist by skeptics.

Dr. Ray affirmed that archeological discoveries haven’t controverted a single reference in the birth narratives of the Gospels. That is why, for example, Dr. McRay, explained, “The general consensus of both liberal and conservative scholars is that Luke is very accurate as a historian. He’s erudite, he’s eloquent, his Greek approaches classical quality, he writes as an educated man, and archaeological discoveries are showing over and over again that Luke is accurate in what he has to say.”

Not only are the Gospels full of real people, places and events, but they are also backed by having some of the earliest and the greatest number (1000s) of handwritten manuscripts compared to other works of antiquity. They demonstrate “99.5 percent free of textual discrepancies” when comparing the New Testament’s earliest manuscripts with today’s modern translations.

Next week, in Part 2, I will reveal how other scholars replied to Strobel’s remaining two questions: Did Jesus fulfill the attributes of God? And did Jesus match the identity of the Messiah — the one who Jews expected to come as the savior of the world?

If you want to read those answers sooner and in greater depth, pick up Lee Strobel’s “The Case for Christmas,” or you can watch Strobel himself detail the evidence in a CCN public speech he gave posted on YouTube.

Speaking of inspirational videos, I can’t complete this Christmas column without recommending you also view a timeless Christmas classic: President Reagan back in 1981 giving his Christmas address from the Oval Office. It is among his best orations on faith and Christmas — one that we may never hear again unless we re-elect another leader in his legacy.

From my wife Gena and I, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and the happiest of New Years!

 

Senator urges UPS to refund customers whose Christmas packages were late

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This is from Fox News Politics.

Senator  Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. STFU!

Let the respective shipping companies solve this matter.

How long before Senator Asshat convenes a Senate committee

and drags the UPS and FedEx up to testify before this committee?

How long before Holder and his injustice department or the

IRS  or both start harassing  UPS and FedEx?

 

A U.S. senator is calling on UPS to refund customers whose Christmas packages got caught up in widespread delays.

“In a very real sense, Christmas is on the line,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., said in a written statement Thursday. “I call on UPS to do the right thing and provide refunds to people whose Christmases were a little less cheery as a result of their late deliveries.”

The senator said he recognizes the “tremendous work” that UPS, as well as the U.S. Postal Service and FedEx, put in this time of year. However, he said he was “disappointed” to learn so many people in his state and across the country were “left empty-handed” on Christmas.

Both UPS and FedEx were playing catch up Thursday after poor weather and overloaded systems delayed packages that were intended to be delivered in time for Christmas.

Neither company said how many packages were delayed but noted it was a small share of overall holiday shipments. But the problems appear to have affected many parts of the country.

“We apologize that our customers did not receive their packages on Christmas,” said Natalie Godwin, a spokeswoman for United Parcel Service Inc.

UPS did not make pickups or deliveries Wednesday. Extra workers were brought in Wednesday night to the company’s hub in Louisville, Ky., to sort packages for Thursday and Friday delivery, according to Godwin.

Godwin said “UPS will honor its peak shipments commitments” to customers who used its air delivery service. Those shipping by ground have no guarantee past Dec. 11. Godwin said she didn’t know if customers would receive refunds.

Between Thanksgiving and Christmas, FedEx handled 275 million shipments, according to Scott Fiedler, a spokesman for FedEx Corp. Those that were not delivered in time, Fiedler said, “would be very few.”

“Our 300,000 team members delivered outstanding service during this holiday season, and we experienced no major service disruptions in the week before Christmas despite heavy volume,”  FedEx spokeswoman Parul Bajaj said in a statement Thursday. “Every single package is important to us, and we will continue to work directly with customers to address any isolated incidents.”

Amazon.com has been notifying some customers affected by the UPS delays that it will refund any shipping charges and is giving them a $20 credit toward a future purchase.

Amazon spokeswoman Mary Osako said the company processed orders and got them to its shippers “on time for holiday delivery” and is now “reviewing the performance of the delivery carriers.”

 

 

 

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