Advertisements
Home

1984: Guess Who’s Scanned All Your Social Media Messages?

1 Comment

H/T Clash Daily.

Everybody  in the lamestream media is loosing their minds about Cambridge Analytica getting peoples personal information yet they were silent when Obama was Hoovering up personal information.

Hell Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg practically had an office in the White House when Bathhouse Barry Obama was there.

                   

Take a wild guess. After all, there are only a couple of options.

Is it the government?

Perhaps.

Russia?

Don’t be silly.

Facebook?

You betcha!

Big Tech is watching you.

Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg admitted as much in a podcast interview with Ezra Klein, the Editor at Large for Vox, that was released on Monday.

The interview, including a discussion on the ambition of Mark Zuckerberg, is so unbelievably creepy — referencing the ‘Facebook Manifesto’ that would ‘alter the global community’ and is ‘beyond one country’.

In the podcast, Klein says that Facebook is more powerful than any government, but is still a private company run by a CEO.

This comes after the Cambridge Analytica scandal that has all of the ‘elites’ up in arms because President Trump utilized social media better than his opponent in 2016.

Still, silence (other than the kudos in 2012) on the Obama 2012 App that was a much more invasive and insidious ‘data mining’ than Cambridge Analytica selling info from a quiz that people willingly participated in. Granted, they didn’t know that their data was being used this way.

FYI, if you choose to take a ‘Which Disney Princess Are You?‘ quiz and it asks you if it can access your Facebook profile, that is indeed an indicator that it is going to use that information somehow for their own profit — they’re selling your information.

[Editor’s Note: I got Belle from Beauty and the Beast.]

Oh, yes. There is Media (D) hypocrisy at play here.

By the way, a former FEC Commissioner believes that this may have been a violation of Federal Law.

The latest news is that Facebook scans all of your private messages — links, text, and photos — in their Messenger app and blocks the ones that ‘contravene’ the social media platform’s guidelines.

While the intentions behind the practice may be well-meaning, the news is likely to add to users’ concerns over what the social network knows about them

…Facebook is also facing criticism for collecting years of data on call and text histories from Android users.

It’s really disturbing what it is that Facebook knows about you.

Between Facebook, Google, and Apple, they know everything about you — heck, they probably know you better than your spouse.

President Trump is looking to have Facebook not be more powerful than any government.

Zuckerberg is set to testify before Congress on April 10 and 11.

There was a story making the rounds on April 1 that Elon Musk had offered to buy Facebook in order to delete it.

That’s just satire, but Musk did shut down the Tesla and SpaceX Facebook pages because the social network gives him ‘the willies’.

Tesla Motors Club@TeslaMotorsClub

Tesla and SpaceX Leave Facebook After Twitter Users Encourage Musk https://teslamotorsclub.com/blog/2018/03/23/tesla-and-spacex-leave-facebook-after-twitter-users-encourage-musk/ 

Elon Musk

@elonmusk

It’s not a political statement and I didn’t do this because someone dared me to do it. Just don’t like Facebook. Gives me the willies. Sorry.

With all the stories about how much Facebook knows about you, most of us have now ‘got the willies’.

One guy’s entire call history to his partner’s mom was gathered by Facebook:

Dylan McKay@dylanmckaynz

Downloaded my facebook data as a ZIP file

Somehow it has my entire call history with my partner’s mum

Some of the checks are user-driven but the disturbing part is that some of them occur automatically.

Users are able to flag posts or messages that they feel are in violation of the site’s house rules.

This will either cause one of the social network’s community operations team to manually review the content, or automated systems can also make decisions.

Facebook is checking photos to make sure that it doesn’t contain child pornography or malware.

‘For example, on Messenger, when you send a photo, our automated systems scan it using photo matching technology to detect known child exploitation imagery or when you send a link, we scan it for malware or viruses,’ a Facebook Messenger spokeswoman said in a statement.

‘Facebook designed these automated tools so we can rapidly stop abusive behaviour on our platform.’

Source: Daily Mail

What if the platform itself is abusive?

It’s no secret that conservative publishers have been hit the hardest by Facebook’s ‘new rules’.

They use left-wing ‘fact checkers’ like Snopes.

They are now using Wikipedia — an ‘open’ encyclopedia that anyone can edit — to smear conservative websites.

The social network is now the largest publisher in the history of the world.

 

         

Advertisements

The Old Man & The Marine

Leave a comment

One sunny day in January 2017, an old man approached the White House from across Pennsylvania Avenue where he’d been sitting on a park bench. He spoke to the U.S. Marine standing guard and said, “I would like to go in and meet with President Obama.” The Marine looked at the man and said, “Sir, Mr. Obama is no longer President and no longer resides here.” The old man said, “Okay,” and walked away.

The following day the same man approached the White House and said to the same Marine, “I would like to go in and meet with President Obama.” The Marine again told the man, “Sir, as I said yesterday, Mr. Obama is no longer President and no longer resides here.” The man thanked him and again just walked away.

The third day the same man approached the White House and spoke to the very same U.S. Marine, saying, “I would like to go in and meet with President Obama.” The Marine, understandably agitated at this point, looked at the man and said, “Sir, this is the third day in a row you have been here asking to speak to Mr. Obama. I’ve told you already that Mr. Obama is no longer the President and no longer resides here. Don’t you understand?”

The old man looked at the Marine, smiled and said, “Oh, I understand. I just love hearing it.”

The Marine snapped to attention, saluted, and said, “See you tomorrow, Sir!

We Are Doomed!

Leave a comment

My wife found this on Facebook.  .

You can not make this stuff folks.

These clowns at Mc Donalds want $15.00 per hour.

 

1468633_10152113841729265_635445414_n

Trying to Find Someone

2 Comments

I found this picture on Facebook.

A man named Ken Burke said this dog tag was found two years ago by an Australian teacher in Viet Nam.

Maybe it will be possible to find him or his family.

10478229_849850455071999_9210137434046819121_n

 

Coach loses his job after posting an open letter about Obama on Facebook

Leave a comment

This is from BizPac Review.

I hope Scott Lee sues these politically correct bastards.  

 

A Maine lacrosse coach lost his job when he posted a letter on Facebook criticizing President Obama with an unflattering–but accurate–description of America’s Muslim heritage.

Scott Lee told The Conway Daily Sun last month he is a politically minded conservative.  “I thought it was an interesting letter to President Obama and his current administration who are not paying attention to Israel and focusing on Iran,” he said.

Lee, 48, coached the boys lacrosse team at Fryeburg Academy, a private “independent secondary school that serves a widely diverse population of local day students and boarding students from across the nation and around the world,” according to the school’s website, which notes the school was incorporated in 1792.

The newspaper reported that Lee said he shared the letter on his personal Facebook page on March 17, and resigned two days later.

He said that Athletic Director Sue Thurston told him told him a decision to fire him had already been made before he had a chance to meet with the school officials.

Fryeburg Academy Head of Schools Erin Mayo said, “We prize each young person we enroll as an individual, and we prize the diversity that they bring.”

She said teachers need to live up to the school’s mission statement, “We strive to create a supportive school environment that promotes respect, tolerance, and cooperation, and prepares students for responsible citizenship.”

Lee said he is not a bigot, and even invited a Muslim former student to stay at his home for nine days.

“I never saw him as a bigot,” Mohammed Islam told the newspaper in a phone interview.  “I don’t agree with Scott’s opinion, but that doesn’t make him a bigot.”

The letter questions the “rich heritage” of Muslims in America, and reads in part:

Dear Mr. Obama:

Have you ever seen a Muslim hospital?

Have you heard a Muslim orchestra?

Have you seen a Muslim band march in a parade?

Have you witnessed a Muslim charity?

Have you seen Muslims shak[ing] hands with Muslim Girl Scouts?

Have you seen a Muslim Candy Striper?

Have your seen a Muslim do anything that contributes positively to the American way of life????

The answer is no, you have not.  Just ask yourself WHY???

Finally, Mr. Obama, where were Muslims on Sept. 11th, 2001?  If they weren’t flying planes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon or a field in Pennsylvania killing nearly 3,000 people on our own soil, they were rejoicing in the Middle East.

No one can dispute the pictures shown from all parts of the Muslim world celebrating on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and other cable news networks that day.  Strangely, the very “moderate” Muslims who’s asses you bent over backwards to kiss in Cairo, Egypt on June 4th were stone cold silent post 9-11.  To many Americans, their silence has meant approval for the acts of that day.

And THAT, Mr. Obama, is the “rich heritage” Muslims have here in America

Read more: http://www.bizpacreview.com/2015/04/06/coach-loses-his-job-after-posting-an-open-letter-about-obama-on-facebook-193176#ixzz3WdIOJfAo

When 16 Schoolchildren are a No-Show for Autistic Kid’s Birthday Party, Police Officers Save the Day

Leave a comment

This is from Independent Journal Review.

I say Bravo to the Osecola County Sheriff’s Office and to the entire St. Cloud community for stepping up to make Glenn’s sixth birthday special.

Ashlee Buratti’s autistic son Glenn invited his 16 classmates to his sixth birthday party. When no one showed up, Glenn was devastated.

Screen Shot via Local 6

Heartbroken after seeing the look on her son’s face, Buratti took to Facebook to express her disappointment. She wrote:

“I know this might be something silly to rant about, but my heart is breaking for my son.”

Shortly after, her Facebook post received an unexpected response from the entire St. Cloud, Florida, community.

Not only did neighbors and strangers show up with gifts, but the Osceola County Sheriff’s Office made an appearance as well — in the form of a helicopter flyover.

Screen Shot via Local 6

The flyover was enough to light up Glenn’s face. Buratti recalls:

“Glenn just smiled the whole time and waved.”

In addition to the flyover, the Sheriff’s Office visited Glenn again the next week with police cars, dogs, and even fire trucks.

Screen Shot via Local 6

Because of the sheer kindness of strangers, a potentially disastrous birthday turned into a truly special experience. Burrati says:

“The amazingness of everybody coming together for somebody they didn’t even know, a kid that didn’t have anybody come to his birthday party, it warmed my heart, she told Local 6.

Glenn’s birthday won’t be remembered as one of heartache. Instead, for years to come, the Buratti family will recall the generosity of the community that came together for their little boy’s happiness.

10 Differences Between Chlidren Who Grew Up in the 70’s vs. Today

Leave a comment

This is from The Mind UnLeashed.org.

 

 

As a child who grew up in the seventies, I’m flabbergasted at the degree of generational differences in health, medicine, food, safety, and general well-being of children.

Don’t get me wrong, I love technology and all the advancements we’ve made in several areas, but at the same time when you break it down to the simplest ways of managing human lives, we’ve taken one step forward and three steps back.

The level of fear we currently exhibit as parents and as a society towards children is at an unprecedented level. When comparing the two time periods, an element of certainty exists where we have now immersed our most precious assets into an toxic, overly hygienic, medicalized, obsessive compulsive, paranoid, anxious and at the very least, a “cowardice culture” where children are being trained and almost indoctrinated into a world where “the norm” is to fear everything and everyone.

1. Our Entertainment Was Each Other
We had no internet, cell phones, computers or video games.

Not only were our lives free of close proximity electronic devices and their constant electromagnetic radiation, but this allowed us to entertain ourselves through peer interaction and physical activity.

You’re talking about a dramatic decrease in the level of physical activity from just 40-50 years ago and it’s manifesting itself in obesity, insulin resistance, and precursors to diabetes in children as young as ten years old.

We didn’t have these distractions taking us away from each other’s presence, which allowed us to interact, manage and entertain our emotional states with friends. Texting, instagraming and facebooking has turned our children into a generation of mindless drones who can only interact when they’re behind a keyboard, earpiece, speaker or headset–anything else is just too scary.

2. Playing Outside Was Normal, Not Prohibited
Most people who pass by a park today and see 10-year old children playing alone, think “why” as fear strikes a chord.

Why are they without their parents? Why are they playing alone without supervision? This was normal and just a way of life in the 70s. We stayed outside until the lights turned off in the summer or heard our parents screaming to come inside.

Nobody called the police because a group of kids were playing alone on their street or in the park. When parents had people over, we were expected to go outdoors.

We didn’t live in nanny state where unsupervised children were seen as having negligent parents. We should all be ashamed of creating a society where children are prohibited from playing outside with their friends after 6pm or chastising parents for allowing them to.

And yes, we had child murderers, molesters, kidnappers back then too. We just didn’t freak out about the “what ifs” at the expense of our children’s freedom and expression of who they are. Now we have them cooped up in front of iPods, iPads, playstation, xbox and any other device that can lock their attention to a screen as long as they’re at home and our perception of security is at ease.

Some people call that technological progress, but it’s nothing more than a safety net to ease our conscience and societal expectations gone adrift.

3. Children Were Not Labeled As ADHD, ADD, or Hyperactive. They Were Just Kids Being Kids
Children today are being medicated at alarming rates for what appears to be normal childhood behavior.

Yes, there are some children with legitimate behavioral issues but they are an extreme minority and none of these issues are solved by medication. The big problem is that we’re diagnosing and labeling common temper outbursts and other disruptive behavior in millions of children as attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

If you took a subset of 3-year old children from 1970 and transported them to our current timeline, you would see that not much has changed , however the way we deal with them has. We are putting kids on long-term stimulants as if it was candy.

A nationwide CDC survey found that 11 percent of children ages 4 to 17 have received a diagnosis of ADHD, and about one in five boys. A vast majority are put on medications such as methylphenidate (commonly known as Ritalin) or amphetamines like Adderall which cause growth suppression, insomnia and hallucinations. About half a trillion US dollars is being wasted on unnecessary medication of young children for ADHD, of which almost 100 million is funded by Medicaid.

The youngest kindergarten kids are 60 percent more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than the oldest in the same grade, and also, by the time those groups reached the fifth and eighth grades, the youngest are more than twice as likely to be on prescription stimulants. We’ve taken all “hard to control” kids and lumped them into a couple of diagnostic categories of what we perceive as mental illness. That’s ridiculous.

Let’s stop targeting children and start being present with them with new activities, adventure, and change. They need balance with activities that are calming, relaxing, and nurturing. Only then will these children respond to a support system that cares about their development rather than a pill to suppress the symptoms.

4. Total Accessiblity To Children Was Not A Need And Neither Was The Incessant Nature Of Constantly Hovering Over Their Safety
If you took a survery of how many 10-year olds today have cell phones, the results would probably shock most people. More than 60 percent of kids between 11 and 14 own a cell phone.

The rise in cell phone use by children mostly stems, at least in part, from the incessant nature of wanting to constantly connect with our children. We want to know where they are at all times. This wasn’t a problem in the 70s because there were no cell phones. But cell phones are not really the source of the problem.

The problem is the parents who operate those cell phones. Helicopter parents in the 70s were a Mom a Dad who had a license to fly a helicopter. Today they are parents who are so attached to their kids that it’s almost impossible to focus on anything else; daily activities, constant conversations and every ounce of effort is reserved for the children.

They fall for all the “gimmie” traps. They feel obligated to provide all the cutest clothes and latest gadgets and they’re terrified of their child making a mistake. They don’t want their children to know what it feels like to reap the consequences of their actions or deal with conflict.

They critcize teachers for all the shortcomings within their children’s education. They’re germaphobes and don’t want their children exposed to anything, even the simplest of colds. They harbor a huge amount of guilt and are so overprotective and over-prepared that you can spot their kids a mile away with an overstuffed backpack, knee and elbow pads, a four-course meal along with a miserable expression.

These types of parents did not exist forty years ago because our parents gave us more freedom in our decision making processes. They didn’t feel they had to cater to our every whim to please us. They knew we loved them regardless of the gift giving or brand named purchases.

They let us make our own mistakes no matter how painful it was for them. They allowed us to accept responsibility for our actions and deal with the consequences.

Most of all, they were more present for us, playing less of an enabler role and more of a supportive role. 1970s parents could school many of today’s helicopter parents in ways that would radically transform the way they think of themselves and their children.

5. It Was OK To Get Hurt
 And We Didn’t Call Every Person That Hurt Us A Bully
Not only was it ok, but it was expected. Kids get hurt, both physically and emotionally. Get over it.

They’re kids. We got bumps, bruises, cuts and were roughed up on a regular basis. Our feelings were hurt and we somehow had the support systems in place to overcome this adversity.

We didn’t have the need for a closed room meeting with a child, their parents and teacher and possibly litigate because a child was pushed or shoved. We didn’t make a big deal about avoiding bullies…we dealt with them We just worked things out.

We think we have a nation of responsible, justice-minded adults when all we are is a bunch of whiners.Anti-bullying programs and campaigns don’t work! You will never address a problem by addressing its symptom.

We live in a world run by short-sighted, trigger happy, control-obsessed, illogical people who don’t understand a thing about human wisdom. Would you like to empower children with the wisdom to be responsible for their own actions based on solid moral principles and empathy, or would you prefer teaching all kids to fit into a behavioral template and abide by certain rules to create a completely safe utopian environment in which everyone is always nice to each other by default, without moral responsibility and the wisdom to know the difference? You can’t have both.

6. The Sun Was Our Friend and We Weren’t Terrified Of Being Exposed Without Lathering Sunblock
This is perhaps one of the biggest misinformation components of primary school curriculums that needs reform immediately. We were never taught that sun was the enemy.

What a coincidence that the more studies that surfaced on the benefits of Vitamin D from sunlight, the more it was demonized in school curriculums. The risk of the sun’s rays had nothing to do with the myth about a dangerous ozone.

When traveling from either pole to the equator, UV exposure increases up to 5000% whereas ozone depletion only increases UV exposure by 20%. If UVB exposure and ozone depletion were the cause of skin cancer, those populations living closest to the equator would be diagnosed with malignant melanoma at a phenomenal frequency.

The opposite is true. We spent hours out in the sun all day every day. We had less incidence of skin cancer everywhere. Millions of children are slowly relearning the sunlight is not our enemy. In fact, using sunscreen leads to mental health disorders and critical illness.

It’s time to set the facts on sunlight exposure straight in schools and once and for all teach kids the growing body of evidence which shows that blocking the sun’s rays from reaching our skin dramatically influences our optimal vitamin D levels, leading to higher mortality, critical illness, mental health disorders and ironically, cancer itself.

7. There Were No Constant Promotions For Drugs and Vaccines For Every Human Symptom That Existed

In the 70s we still had significant trust within the medical and pharmaceutical industry.

That’s probably because we didn’t have a drug or vaccine being shoved down our throats for every human symptom. In the early 70s there were about a dozen vaccines administered to children for seven different diseases in the United States. By 2013, if you followed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) endorsed annual childhood vaccine schedule, your child would have received over 36 vaccines by the time they were 6 years of age!

That’s 36 vaccines filled with detergents,neurotoxic, carcinogenic, immunotoxic, and infertility agents at a time when a child’s immune system is at its most critical point in development. We trusted vaccination because we weren’t fully aware the false statistics that were produced by pharmaceutical industries and we certainly were not aware of the lies and questionable contribution of medical measures relating to mortality that we know of today. To those who inform themselves through diverse research interests, there is only one conclusion that drugs and vaccines are currently more risky than beneficial to human health.

No longer is there a unified trust of the medical system among the population. We now know that most scientific studies on drugs and vaccination is not true science but industry funded propaganda.

When we examine how medical science will cut, poison and burn via surgery,chemotherapy and using CT scans and radiation to diagnose and treat cancer, or if investigate how the use of psyche drugs to manage symptoms are usually at the cost of interfering with other precious physiological functions in young bodies, or any of the other myths  medical doctors have been parroting for the last several decades, it’s a no brainer that children must be further educated on the downfalls of a system which is designed to keep us sick rather than healthy.

 

8. We Played in Dirt and Wiped Our Hands and Faces With Soap and Water, Not Antibacterial Nonsense
What ever happened to soap and water? Who was the genius that started convincing parents to keep their children out of the mud and dirt and keep them saturated in chemical concoctions to remove bacteria? Antibacterial soaps didn’t exist in the 70s and the incidence of allergies was quite infrequent among children.

Today we know that parents who adopt and overly hygienic lifestyle for their children are at anincreased risk of developing asthma, allergies and eczema. When babies’ exposure to germs is so limited, their immune systems are deprived of the opportunity to learn how to fend off pathogens properly.

Consequently their immune systems become so sensitive that the babies develop allergies. Scientists at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have at least partially admitted that anti-bacterial soaps may pose a threat to human health. The widespread use of these products containing the antibacterial agent triclosan are promoting growth of dangerous superbugs that didn’t exist several decades ago.

9. Chemical Toxicity In Consumer Products Was Still Low Compared To Today
BPAfluorideparabensphthalatesPFOAfiberglass, oxybenzone, BHA and dozens of other chemicals makes up a very long laundry list of environmental toxins which didn’t affect every households in the 70s as they do today.

Combine this with geoengineering initiatives polluting the entire atmosphere with toxins, and you have a toxic planet from soil to sky. Developing children are at even greater risk than adults for harm from the above chemicals.

A child in the 1970s was far less poisoned overall than children are today. Current generations are exposed to toxic effects which are far reaching affecting almost every body system, so it is imperative that they learn how we must change our planet into one that is environmentally friendly with consumer products that benefit the planet and all its organisms rather than destroy it.

10. There Was No Gluten-Free, Sugar-Free, Fat-Free, Dairy-Free, GMO-Free, Etc.
The 70s and 80s became the downfall of modern agriculture in terms of toxicity. We saw the introduction of the world’s greatest selling and most toxic herbicide glyphosate, which entered the marketplace in 1974.

The herbicide quickly established itself as a mainstream product for widespread agricultural and consumer use. Monsanto quickly began manipulating plant genomes to develop genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) that not only tolerated glyphosate-based pesticides, but required their use.

Up until the mid 70s we still had an amazing diversity of organic farms with very minimal pesticide use. The nutrient content of foods was still very high compared to today. With the advances in modern food technology came extended shelf life which added a tremendous diversity of emulsifiers, preservatives, artificial sweeteners to replace full-fat in dairy products, which led to low-fat and sugar-free products being introduced thereafter at the expense of our health.

Only then was there an influx of dozens of harmful ingredients that were incorporated into many foods. It was also at this point when wheat, the world’s most popular grain became the deadliest for the human metabolism.

At some point in our history, this ancient grain was nutritious in some respects, however modern wheat really isn’t wheat at all. Once agribusiness took over to develop a higher-yielding crop, wheat became hybridized to such an extent that it has been completely transformed from it’s prehistorical genetic configuration.

All nutrient content of modern wheat depreciated more than 30% in its natural unrefined state compared to its ancestral genetic line. The balance and ratio that mother nature created for wheat was also modified and human digestion and physiology could simply could not adapt quick enough to the changes.

The concept of gluten being a very dangerous protein was then investigated and hence today, many foods are gluten-free. Dairy-free is another term that was absent from food labels.

As milk became more harmful to human health through the introduction of more antibiotics, growth hormones andpasteurization, more people became increasingly ill in the 80s and onwards as factory milk farms created a liquid devoid of practically all nutrition.

Besides the popularity of veganism today, more people are choosing dairy-free products due to what is now the inherent toxic nature of all processed cow milk.

I have fond memories of the 1970s and I’m sure people who grew up before this time also enjoyed even greater health and abundance.

We must realize that with every passing decade comes a cycle of change. We can never go back to who we were and our focus should be on making our future better for ourselves and our children.

We can continue on this cycle of fear and raise a generation of timid and paranoid children, or we can empower them to become all that they can be, accepting consequences and responsibility of becoming mature, benevolent, conscious and loving beings.

When love is in the equation, fear usually takes a back seat. At that point, anything is possible.

 

The Race Card Cometh Yet Again (Again)

Leave a comment

This is from Town Hall.

The DemocRats are the masters of playing the race card.

I found this picture on Facebook it explains why DemocRats need the race card.

 

When it comes to life’s guarantees, there’s death, taxes, death taxes, the tides, the Chicago Cubs not winning a World Series, and the race card being played by Democrats as an election approaches.

With less than two weeks to go before this year’s mid-term elections, that last guarantee is in full effect.

Polls show Democrats aren’t very excited at the prospect of voting next month. They’re disappointed by the president’s failures and the fumbles by their candidates. But make no mistake – they will vote, and they will vote for the Democrats.

Polls on enthusiasm are interesting but irrelevant in terms of results. The vote of people who march into a polling place with a smile on their face and all the hope in the world in their hearts counts the same as the vote of someone reluctantly sulking in the booth next to them.

It’s down to headcount now – who can get people to show up and vote.

To that end, Democrats are starting to panic. Without President Obama on the ballot, many reliable Democratic voters simply don’t care about the election. The party must do whatever it can to get those people to the polls.

Democrats worry most about black turnout, so we’re seeing efforts to “inspire” black voters to go to the polls. Their tactic is humans’ greatest motivating force—fear.

In Georgia, where Democrat Michelle Nunn is battling with Republican David Perdue, Democrats are circulating fliers telling voters to vote if they “want to prevent another Ferguson.” This reference to the shooting of an unarmed black man by a white police officer was roundly condemned by everyone except Democrats. Nunn refused to disavow it. She hopes this race-based appeal will motivate more black voters to the polls than it will turn off.

In North Carolina, a shadowy group supporting Democratic Sen. Kay Hagandistributed fliers on cars at a black church that warned, “If Kay Hagan doesn’t win! Obama’s impeachment will begin! Vote in 2014.” Those words were superimposed over an actual picture of a lynched black man and a crowd of white onlookers. The message is clear – vote for the Democrat to stop the black president from being lynched. Ironically, the white men in the picture most likely were Democrats, given the party’s history of segregation and racism.

Those events took place in states where Republicans routinely win statewide, but this disgusting phenomenon isn’t relegated exclusively to red states.

Two of these events took place this week in Maryland, one of our bluest states.

The race for governor of Maryland was a formality, or at least that’s what conventional wisdom told us. Democratic Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown was all but assured victory, running in a state with a 2 to 1 voter registration advantage over Republicans. Brown had the added advantage of history, running to be the first black governor in a state with a large black population.

But Brown is an uninspiring candidate running an uninspiring campaign in a state weary of the failures of the previous eight years of Democratic rule. Moreover, he is best known for being in charge of setting up Maryland’s Obamacare exchange, a process that failed so miserably the state abandoned the effort and purchased a system from Connecticut. And he’s running against a successful small businessman in Larry Hogan, who has a vision for the state. In an election experts predicted would be a double-digit Democratic victory, it’s a 1-point race.

That closeness explains why the Democratic Party turned to race this week.

First Democrats sent out a mailer to black voters that invoked segregated waiting rooms and anti-civil right marches and equated voting for Brown with Martin Luther King’s March on Washington. (Seriously, take a minute, click here and see for yourself.)

The next day, black voters got another flier drawing a direct line from Martin Luther King to Barack Obama to Anthony Brown. Worse, it used the racially charged events in Ferguson, Mo., as an example of ways Republicans are “still trying to hold us back.” (Again, take a minute, click here and see it for yourself. I ask you to share both on Facebook and Twitter because people need to see the depths to which Democrats will go to scare people to win.)

These examples of depravity and desperation are not the actions of a confident party. Democrats are worried, and rightly so. But if conservatives, libertarians and Republicans sit out Nov. 4 to either “send a message” or because of apathy toward the party or a candidate running in their state, these tactics will be rewarded with governor’s mansions and maintained control of the Senate. And, ultimately, more control over your wallet, your liberty and your life.

If that happens, two years from now there will be nothing to stop more thinking like this from moving into the White House. The choice is yours.

 

LAWCOMMENTARY 6 Key Supreme Court Cases This Term

Leave a comment

This is from The Daily Signal.

We need to watch the Supreme Courts up coming session.

If you use Facebook, pay taxes, enjoy fishing or drive a car, the 2014-2015 term of the Supreme Court, which begins Oct. 6, will be worth watching.

 

 

Many of the cases from the last term touched on issues such as executive power, religious liberty, free speech and racial preferences.

Here are highlights of the upcoming term:

1. Elonis v. United States: Aspiring rapper Anthony “Tone Dougie” Elonis was convicted of making criminal threats after posting rap lyrics on Facebook about killing his estranged wife. Did the government have to prove Tone Dougie intended to actually threaten his wife, or is it enough to show that a reasonable person would have viewed those Facebook posts as true threats?

2. Department of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads: Can Congress delegate regulatory authority to a private entity? This case involves a 2008 law that authorized Amtrak to co-author regulations governing the railroad industry. Amtrak is a unique creature—created by an act of Congress but run as a for-profit corporation. The Court will decide whether this delegation of regulatory authority was proper.

3. Heien v. North Carolina: Ignorance of the law is no excuse, or so the saying goes. Consistent with the Fourth Amendment, a police officer may make a traffic stop if he has a reasonable suspicion a law is being violated. But what happens if the officer makes a mistake about what the law requires?

4. Holt v. Hobbs: Can a state prison prohibit inmates from having beards? An inmate serving a life sentence in Arkansas argues he must maintain a beard to comply with his faith and notes that 39 other states and the District of Columbia allow inmates to grow beards of varying lengths. The Supreme Court will decide whether the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act protects this exercise of religion.

5. Maryland State Comptroller of the Treasury v. Wynne: In Maryland, residents pay not only a state income tax, but also a county income tax. This case involves Maryland residents who are trying to avoid paying duplicative taxes for income earned out-of-state and already taxed by other states. But the Supreme Court previously ruled states can tax their residents seemingly without limits.

6. Yates v. United States: Does the federal white collar criminal law known as Sarbanes-Oxley cover “shredding” fish? In this case, a Fish and Wildlife officer issued a citation to John Yates for catching undersized red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico. Yates was instructed to return to port where the grouper were to be seized, but when he arrived, the officer counted fewer undersized fish and suspected Yates threw them overboard. Yates was convicted under Sarbanes-Oxley for destroying “tangible objects” with the intent to obstruct an investigation.

The Supreme Court has plenty of room on its 2014-2015 docket to add more cases, and it may do so following the “mega-conference” on Sept. 29. The justices may not be eager to jump back into the marriage debate—as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suggested during a talk at a law school last week—but it seems only a matter of time before the issue is back before the Court. Following the Court’s 2012 decision inUnited States v. Windsor, traditional marriage laws have fallen across the country. Parties from cases out of Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin already have petitioned the Court for review.

The justices also may hear a challenge to the IRS subsidizing health insurance purchased from federally-run Obamacare exchanges. Section 36B of the Internal Revenue Code, enacted as part of Obamacare, allows the IRS to provide subsidies to individuals who buy health insurance through state-run exchanges, and the IRS claims it can extend this to individuals in the 27 states that chose not to open exchanges. Two appellate courts issued rulings within hours of each other that reached opposite conclusions about this IRS interpretation. Given the significant implications this may have for the practical implementation of the law, it looks like Obamacare may be heading back to the Court for a third time.

To hear about all these cases and how the term may unfold, join us at Heritage for our annual Supreme Court Preview onThursday at noon (or watch online). Legal luminaries Paul Clement and Michael Carvin will discuss the big cases of the upcoming term.

Many of the cases from the last term touched on issues such as executive power, religious liberty, free speech and racial preferences.

Here are highlights of the upcoming term:

1. Elonis v. United States: Aspiring rapper Anthony “Tone Dougie” Elonis was convicted of making criminal threats after posting rap lyrics on Facebook about killing his estranged wife. Did the government have to prove Tone Dougie intended to actually threaten his wife, or is it enough to show that a reasonable person would have viewed those Facebook posts as true threats?

2. Department of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads: Can Congress delegate regulatory authority to a private entity? This case involves a 2008 law that authorized Amtrak to co-author regulations governing the railroad industry. Amtrak is a unique creature—created by an act of Congress but run as a for-profit corporation. The Court will decide whether this delegation of regulatory authority was proper.

3. Heien v. North Carolina: Ignorance of the law is no excuse, or so the saying goes. Consistent with the Fourth Amendment, a police officer may make a traffic stop if he has a reasonable suspicion a law is being violated. But what happens if the officer makes a mistake about what the law requires?

4. Holt v. Hobbs: Can a state prison prohibit inmates from having beards? An inmate serving a life sentence in Arkansas argues he must maintain a beard to comply with his faith and notes that 39 other states and the District of Columbia allow inmates to grow beards of varying lengths. The Supreme Court will decide whether the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act protects this exercise of religion.

5. Maryland State Comptroller of the Treasury v. Wynne: In Maryland, residents pay not only a state income tax, but also a county income tax. This case involves Maryland residents who are trying to avoid paying duplicative taxes for income earned out-of-state and already taxed by other states. But the Supreme Court previously ruled states can tax their residents seemingly without limits.

6. Yates v. United States: Does the federal white collar criminal law known as Sarbanes-Oxley cover “shredding” fish? In this case, a Fish and Wildlife officer issued a citation to John Yates for catching undersized red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico. Yates was instructed to return to port where the grouper were to be seized, but when he arrived, the officer counted fewer undersized fish and suspected Yates threw them overboard. Yates was convicted under Sarbanes-Oxley for destroying “tangible objects” with the intent to obstruct an investigation.

The Supreme Court has plenty of room on its 2014-2015 docket to add more cases, and it may do so following the “mega-conference” on Sept. 29. The justices may not be eager to jump back into the marriage debate—as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suggested during a talk at a law school last week—but it seems only a matter of time before the issue is back before the Court. Following the Court’s 2012 decision Unitedin States v. Windsor, traditional marriage laws have fallen across the country. Parties from cases out of Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin already have petitioned the Court for review.

The justices also may hear a challenge to the IRS subsidizing health insurance purchased from federally-run Obamacare exchanges. Section 36B of the Internal Revenue Code, enacted as part of Obamacare, allows the IRS to provide subsidies to individuals who buy health insurance through state-run exchanges, and the IRS claims it can extend this to individuals in the 27 states that chose not to open exchanges. Two appellate courts issued rulings within hours of each other that reached opposite conclusions about this IRS interpretation. Given the significant implications this may have for the practical implementation of the law, it looks like Obamacare may be heading back to the Court for a third time.

To hear about all these cases and how the term may unfold, join us at Heritage for our annual Supreme Court Preview Thursdayon at noon (or watch online). Legal luminaries Paul Clement and Michael Carvin will discuss the big cases of the upcoming term.

enjoy fishing or drive a car, the 2014-2015 term of the Supreme Court, which begins Oct. 6, will be worth watching.

 

 

Many of the cases from the last term touched on issues such as executive power, religious liberty, free speech and racial preferences.

Here are highlights of the upcoming term:

1. Elonis v. United States: Aspiring rapper Anthony “Tone Dougie” Elonis was convicted of making criminal threats after posting rap lyrics on Facebook about killing his estranged wife. Did the government have to prove Tone Dougie intended to actually threaten his wife, or is it enough to show that a reasonable person would have viewed those Facebook posts as true threats?

2. Department of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads: Can Congress delegate regulatory authority to a private entity? This case involves a 2008 law that authorized Amtrak to co-author regulations governing the railroad industry. Amtrak is a unique creature—created by an act of Congress but run as a for-profit corporation. The Court will decide whether this delegation of regulatory authority was proper.

3. Heien v. North Carolina: Ignorance of the law is no excuse, or so the saying goes. Consistent with the Fourth Amendment, a police officer may make a traffic stop if he has a reasonable suspicion a law is being violated. But what happens if the officer makes a mistake about what the law requires?

4. Holt v. Hobbs: Can a state prison prohibit inmates from having beards? An inmate serving a life sentence in Arkansas argues he must maintain a beard to comply with his faith and notes that 39 other states and the District of Columbia allow inmates to grow beards of varying lengths. The Supreme Court will decide whether the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act protects this exercise of religion.

5. Maryland State Comptroller of the Treasury v. Wynne: In Maryland, residents pay not only a state income tax, but also a county income tax. This case involves Maryland residents who are trying to avoid paying duplicative taxes for income earned out-of-state and already taxed by other states. But the Supreme Court previously ruled states can tax their residents seemingly without limits.

6. Yates v. United States: Does the federal white collar criminal law known as Sarbanes-Oxley cover “shredding” fish? In this case, a Fish and Wildlife officer issued a citation to John Yates for catching undersized red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico. Yates was instructed to return to port where the grouper were to be seized, but when he arrived, the officer counted fewer undersized fish and suspected Yates threw them overboard. Yates was convicted under Sarbanes-Oxley for destroying “tangible objects” with the intent to obstruct an investigation.

The Supreme Court has plenty of room on its 2014-2015 docket to add more cases, and it may do so following the “mega-conference” on Sept. 29. The justices may not be eager to jump back into the marriage debate—as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suggested during a talk at a law school last week—but it seems only a matter of time before the issue is back before the Court. Following the Court’s 2012 decision inUnited States v. Windsor, traditional marriage laws have fallen across the country. Parties from cases out of Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin already have petitioned the Court for review.

The justices also may hear a challenge to the IRS subsidizing health insurance purchased from federally-run Obamacare exchanges. Section 36B of the Internal Revenue Code, enacted as part of Obamacare, allows the IRS to provide subsidies to individuals who buy health insurance through state-run exchanges, and the IRS claims it can extend this to individuals in the 27 states that chose not to open exchanges. Two appellate courts issued rulings within hours of each other that reached opposite conclusions about this IRS interpretation. Given the significant implications this may have for the practical implementation of the law, it looks like Obamacare may be heading back to the Court for a third time.

To hear about all these cases and how the term may unfold, join us at Heritage for our annual Supreme Court Preview onThursday at noon (or watch online). Legal luminaries Paul Clement and Michael Carvin will discuss the big cases of the upcoming term.

Perry Grand Juror Was An Active Democratic Party Delegate During Jury Proceedings

Leave a comment

This is from MediaTrackers.

Do not tell me this is not a political witch hunt against Rick Perry.

Why are the DemocRats so afraid of Rick Perry?

 

Rho Chalmers, who disclosed to the Houston Chronicle yesterday that she was a member of the grand jury that indicted Texas Gov. Rick Perry, was an active delegate to the Texas Democratic Party convention during grand jury proceedings. Chalmers’ active participation in Democratic state politics is important because she claimed yesterday to the Houston Chronicle that her decision to indict Perry, a Republican, was not based on politics.

“For me, it’s not a political decision,” Chalmers told the newspaper. “That’s what a grand jury is about – take the emotion out of it and look at the facts and make your best decision based on your life experience.”

More troubling, however, is the fact that Chalmers attended, photographed, and commented on an event with Democratic state Sen. Kirk Watson while grand jury proceedings were ongoing.

Watson was a witness in front of the grand jury. On June 27, 2014, Chalmers shared a photo of the Watson event on a community Facebook page she started called Developer’s Dungeon. “Senator Kirk Watson telling the story of the Wendy Davis fillibuster (sic),” she wrote in a comment accompanying the picture.

Rho Chalmers Kirk Watson Post

The grand jury was selected in April of 2014 and its proceedings did not conclude until it returned two indictments of Perry last week. While grand jurors are not generally prohibited from engaging in political activity, Chalmers’ apparent giddiness at attending an event for a grand jury witness calls into question her ability to objectively scrutinize his testimony. Watson had testified before Chalmers and the rest of her colleagues on the grand jury just one month before Chalmers attended his event. Knowingly seeking out participation in an event featuring a grand jury witness while grand jury proceedings were ongoing also seems highly questionable.

Numerous posts from both of Chalmers’ Facebook pages — her personal page, which she shares with her husband, Davis, and her “Developer’s Dungeon” page — make clear that she is a partisan Democratic activist, and that she was an active participant in the Texas Democratic Party’s state convention in June while grand jury proceedings were ongoing.

In one Facebook post on her personal page from June 28, she snapped a selfie showcasing her convention credentials.

Rho Chalmers TDPC Selfie

In a separate post on her “Developer’s Dungeon page,” Chalmers showcased her s and bragged about her participation on the party’s Rules Committee.

“The Rules Committee was challenging but fun. A little over half a day to resolve everything but we ‘got er done’!” she wrote. She then liked and shared that post using her personal Facebook page, where she noted that she was “pleasantly surprised that I wasn’t completely lost on this committee.”

Rho Chalmers TDPC CredentialsRho Chalmers Rules Committee Pleasantly Surprised

Each of these posts was made while the grand jury was convened and its proceedings were ongoing.

Other Facebook activity from Chalmers also demonstrates her partisan political leanings. Her personal Facebook page shows that Chalmers “likes” the following Facebook groups: University Democrats, Central Austin Democrats, Black Austin Democrats, and South Travis United Democrats.

The University Democrats Facebook page crowed about Perry’s indictment shortly after it was announced.

Chalmers also implied support of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis in a post, photo, and comment from November 24, 2013.

Rho Chalmers Blue Texas Wendy Davis

“Wow, a blue Texas,” she wrote, referring to a national weather map from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“[C]oming soon when wendy davis wins!” commented one of her friends.

“[G]rin,” Chalmers replied.

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: