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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 76th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

 

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

3 Comments

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 75th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

Remembering Pearl Harbor

4 Comments

 

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 74th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

Pentagon plans to identify hundreds killed in Pearl Harbor

1 Comment

This is from FoxNews.

I think this project is a great thing for the families of the unknowns from the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The families can finally have the peace of mind knowing their loved ones have been identified and given a proper burial.

uss oklahoma

May 24, 1943: File photo, the deck of the capsized battleship USS Oklahoma breaks water at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. (AP Photo, File)

Tom Gray’s family has waited for more than 70 years to bring home the remains of his cousin who was killed in the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.

On Tuesday, they got a step closer when the military announced it would exhume and attempt to identify the remains of almost 400 sailors and Marines from the USS Oklahoma who were buried as unknowns after the war.

Gray’s cousin, Edwin Hopkins, of Swanzey, New Hampshire, was a 19-year-old fireman third class on board the USS Oklahoma when the battleship was hit by nine torpedoes and capsized on Dec. 7, 1941. His remains weren’t identified and his family was told he was missing.

Gray said Hopkins’ mother never accepted that. She believed he had amnesia and he would show up one day, Gray said.

Hopkins’ parents, Frank and Alice Hopkins, put his name on their headstone in Keene, New Hampshire, thinking he would join them one day, Gray said.

 They did so, “just waiting for him to come home,” Gray said.

All together, 429 sailors and Marines on board the Oklahoma were killed. Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

Hundreds were buried as unknowns at cemeteries in Hawaii. In 1950, they were reburied as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific inside a volcanic crater in Honolulu.

The military is acting now because advances in forensic science and technology as well as genealogical help from family members have made it possible to identify more remains, said Lt. Col. Melinda Morgan, a Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency spokeswoman.

Officials plan to begin the work in three to six weeks, Morgan said. They aim to identify the remains of up to 388 servicemen within five years.

In 2003, the military disinterred one casket from the Honolulu cemetery, commonly called Punchbowl, based on information provided by Ray Emory, a Pearl Harbor survivor who has spent years doggedly scouring documents.

Many remains were co-mingled when buried, and the military was able to identify five servicemen from that casket. But the coffin also contained the remains of up to 100 others who haven’t been identified.

Gray said his family in 2008 learned from a group of USS Oklahoma survivors that Emory had identified discrepancies in the records of the 22 buried as unknowns, including his cousin.

The 22 are buried in about five graves at Punchbowl, Gray said.

“Since then, the families have been fighting to have these sailors disinterred and brought home,” said Gray, who lives in Guilford, Connecticut.

Gray said he understands it’s an honor to be buried at a national cemetery. At the same time, he said Hopkins is part of his family.

“I also think that a boy gives up his life at 19 years old and ends up in a co-mingled grave marked as ‘unknown’ isn’t proper. I never did,” Gray said.

The unidentified remains of sailors and Marines from other Pearl Harbor battleships, like the USS West Virginia, are also buried at Punchbowl.

On Tuesday, the Pentagon announced new criteria for exhuming these and other remains from military cemeteries for identification.

In the case of co-mingled remains, the military must estimate it will be able to identify at least 60 percent of the people exhumed. For individual unknowns, there must be at least a 50 percent chance it will be able to identify the person disinterred.

 

World War II veteran en route to Pearl Harbor ceremony booted from flight

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This is from Fox News.

Why was it just two people booted from the flight?

This veteran is 90 years old with failing eyesight he should

have priority on this flight.

Oh silly me no one respects the elderly and veterans any more.

 

660371pearlharbor.jpg

  • December 7, 1941: Members of the U.S. Military stand near airplane wreckage during the surprise Japanese aerial attack at Naval Air Station at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. (REUTERS)

  •  

 

A 90-year-old World War II veteran en route to a ceremony marking the 72nd anniversary of the attack at Pearl Harbor was booted from his flight to accommodate the weight of additional jet fuel needed for the trip.

According to Hawaii News Now, Ewalt “Walt” Shatz, a WWII veteran credited with shooting down a Japanese plane during the 1941 attack, was scheduled to take a United Airlines flight direct from Los Angeles to Honolulu on Wednesday, but was re-booked on an American Airlines flight leaving eight hours later that included a layover in Maui.

“I was surprised.  I didn’t know which way to go.  Here I am at LAX with all these people and it’s all new to me. I was just lost I didn’t know what to do which is an awful feeling,” Shatz told the paper.

Shatz was traveling alone and suffers from macular degeneration, an eye condition that limits his sight. “They just left me kind of stranded. Here I’m 90 years old, and I don’t know — I really didn’t have anybody else I could call.”

Shatz said he was told by a United Airlines agent at LAX only two passengers on the Boeing 737 to Honolulu had been booted.

“I thought that they just overbooked the deal and they were trying to get rid of a couple of customers and somebody had my seat — and that’s what made me mad, because I paid for that seat.  I paid for that seat and somebody else is sitting in it,” Shatz told WOAI News 4. “I was lost. I didn’t know what to do.”

Shatz reportedly told two United desk agents — and a supervisor — he was a WWII vet invited to attend a remembrance ceremony at the USS Arizona memorial to mark the attack’s anniversary.

United, in a statement to Hawaii News Now, said, “Inclement weather in the path of United flight 1226 required the flight to carry additional fuel and, as a result, reduce the number of passengers on board by 41.

“United agents in Los Angeles re-booked those customers, including Mr. Shatz, on the best available alternate flights on United and other airlines. We look forward to speaking with Mr. Shatz and the other affected customers.”

Shatz arrived in Honolulu just before midnight and in time for the ceremony.

Word of his Shatz’s plight traveled quickly on the Internet, and 71 people – mostly U.S. service members – organized a last-second welcoming party for him at the airport in Honolulu.

“Getting ready to put my khakis on and go greet a WWII vet (Pearl Harbor Survivor)… If you are on island and would like to come greet and honor this hero, come on out,” Navy Chief Benjiman Scott wrote in part on his Facebook page, according to the paper.

“Everybody wanted a picture with me and they were making out like I was hero, but I’m not really.  It was embarrassing in a way, but I liked it.  It was nice,” Shatz told WOAI News 4.

Reportedly added Chief Navy Counselor Rex Parmelee: “This is why we’re serving.  We’re here to tell their story.  We’re here to show our respect for them.  It’s a tremendous honor and that’s why we take it so serious. Heritage is huge.”

Shatz was 18 years old in 1941 when Japanese warplanes attacked Pearl Harbor. The Navy has reportedly credited him with shooting down a Japanese plane during the battle with an anti-aircraft gun.

“I don’t know if I did or not; somebody said I did,” Shatz reportedly said. “I fired a 50 caliber machine gun and it’s possible I did shoot at some planes, but whether I hit any or not — that’s another story.  I don’t take any credit for any of that. Whether I did or not, probably only God knows.”

Click for the story from Hawaii News Now.

Remembering Pearl Harbor

4 Comments

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 70th. anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.
I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be

taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards. Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.
Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back on the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.
We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

Remembering Pearl Harbor

3 Comments

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

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