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The 10 Countries with the Most Guns in Private Hands

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This is from OutDoorHub.

I was surprised by some of the countries on the list.

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Somebody should probably tell this man about trigger discipline. Image from Yann on the Wikimedia Commons

Every wonder which countries have the most firepower in private hands? This article lists off those nations. Unlike most lists that cover this subject, ours will be based on total amount of privately-owned firearms rather than guns per capita.

Data is taken from Small Arms Survey.

Honorable mentions that didn’t make the top 10 include Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Serbia, and Finland.

10. Canada

  • Estimated private firearms: 9,950,000
  • 31 guns per 100 residents

We expected Canada to be a lot higher on this list but the True North barely squeezed by into the top 10. Canada does have a long and rich history of gun ownership, and experts say that more and more young people are getting involved in shooting sports. However, a lengthy and complicated process to purchase firearms dissuades many from buying their own.

Check out our list of guns that are available in Canada but not the United States here.

9. Thailand

  • Estimated private firearms: 10,000,000
  • 16 guns per 100 residents

On a single road in Bangkok, over 80 gun shops fight and jostle for customers to enter their shops or check their stalls. This is indicative of the reverent gun culture in Thailand—one that is a match for the United States. Actually purchasing a firearm is still a long and demanding process, but that does not stop residents from being armed. Firearms are much more expensive in Thailand than in the States, and the same brand-name guns that are widely available elsewhere can cost up to five times higher in the Asian nation. This is due to the fact that there are few gun manufacturers in Thailand and most weapons are imported. Most of the guns there are American or Chinese-made.

“Consumers for firearms in Thailand are mostly middle to upper class,” Firearms Association of Thailand’s Polpatr Tanomsup told CNN. “They want better quality, because if they imported China-made guns, it would not be much cheaper than American-made firearms, and the quality for American is much higher. It is collectible, easy to sell, easy to buy, easy to get parts.”

8. Yemen

  • Estimated private firearms: 11,500,000
  • 55 guns per 100 residents

If there is a country that can outmatch the United States in gun ownership, it might be Yemen. It is nearly mandatory for residents to own at least one firearm, and almost wherever you go, you will find guns up for grab. Uncertain about their future, the people of Yemen rely on their trusty firearms for protection.

“In Yemen, no matter if you’re rich or poor, you must have guns. Even if it’s just one piece,” Abdul Wahab al-Ammari, a tribal sheikh from Yemen’s Ibb province, told The Atlantic. “I have maybe 14 high powered weapons, and 3 handguns [at home].”

7. Brazil

  • Estimated private firearms: 14,840,000
  • 8 guns per 100 residents

Unlike Yemen, one of the world’s poorest nations, Brazil is a rising star on the global stage. Like most of the nations on this list, gun ownership is not a legal right in Brazil. Residents have to be at least 25 years old to apply for a ownership permit, which must be renewed every three years, and actual carry permits are hard to obtain. Despite these hurdles, gun ownership remains popular in Brazil and being home to notable manufacturers like Taurus makes the country the second-largest gun-producing nation in the Western Hemisphere.

6. Mexico

  • Estimated private firearms: 15,500,000
  • 15 guns per 100 residents

Previously, Mexico’s constitution guaranteed the right to bear arms. The current version limits that right to only keeping arms, and in practice, gun ownership is heavily restricted. In some of Mexico’s more dangerous areas, security forces are spread thin and residents are called upon to defend themselves with their own firearms.

5. Pakistan

  • Estimated private firearms: 18,000,000
  • 12 guns per 100 residents

Home of the notorious Khyber Pass and its gun “industry,” it comes as no surprise that Pakistan made it onto this list. Amateur and experienced gunsmiths alike work in the Khyber Pass region, producing unlicensed and, in many cases, homemade-quality firearms from materials like railway rails and scrap metal.

4. Germany

  • Estimated private firearms: 25,000,000
  • 30 guns per 100 residents

Whether it’s for hunting wild boar or sport shooting, guns are very popular in Germany. Commonplace though they might be, Germany has severe restrictions on what kind of guns one can buy, and applicants for gun ownership must prove a need before being issued a permit. Self-defense isn’t necessarily an accepted reason. Nonetheless, German gun owners say that such regulations are expected.

“On the one hand, we think, ‘Oh, it’s very restrictive, and we don’t like that,’” sport shooter Friedrich Gepperth told NPR. “On the other hand, each case of misuse by a legal gun owner is very bad for us, so we are not going against the restrictions very much.”

3. China

  • Estimated private firearms: 40,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Surprised to see this country on the list? Despite having some of the strictest gun laws in the world—a blanket ban on private firearm ownership—gun culture seems to be taking hold. How is this possible? With a multitude of shooting and hunting clubs, guns are once again finding their place back into Chinese hands. According to some, it’s hard not to romanticize firearms due to their popularity in film and television.

“In the 1960s, shooting was for national defense,” Xie Xianqiao, a former shooting coach, told The Wall Street Journal. “These days, shooting is entertainment.”

That said, private ownership without the proper permits can still lead to a hefty fine and lengthy prison sentence. Crimes committed with a firearm often receive the death penalty.

2. India

  • Estimated private firearms: 45,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Guns in the world’s most populous democracy are both protection and a status symbol. Proper firearms are expensive—enough to be included in dowries—and a single 1911 pistol can sell for several times its asking US price. Domestically-produced guns are available, but lack the reliability and style of foreign-made firearms. Concern over sexual attacks have also led to guns becoming more popular among women—as well as fathers.

Bank manager Jagdeep Singh says he keeps a pistol on his hip to fight off bandits during long car rides, but it also gives him safety of mind when he’s home.

“I have two good-looking daughters,” he told The Los Angeles Times, “another reason I keep a gun.”

1. United States of America

  • Estimated private firearms: 270,000,000
  • 89 guns per 100 residents

Was there ever really any doubt that we’d be number one on this list? The United States of America is by far the best country in the world to be in if you want to own guns. The constitutional right to keep and bear arms (where it isn’t infringed upon by local law), combined with large popular support for gun ownership and easy availability, make the United States a gun collector’s dream.

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It’s OK to Kill Your Children but Not Educate Them

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This is from Godfather Politics.

You are able to murder your unborn baby.

You can murder your unborn baby late-term.

But try to educate your child you get locked up.

The state wants your children in indoctrination centers.

 

A number of countries are clamping down on family education of children, better known as homeschooling. Parents decide to educate their children in the home instead of sending them off to a government institution or a private school that must adhere to specific state educational guidelines.

Free-sex Sweden is notorious for denying parents the right to educate their children at home. A woman can kill her pre-born baby up until the eighteenth week of pregnancy for any reason, but if she decides to give birth, the State controls her child’s education.

Rabbi Alexander Namdar and his wife Leah decided to educate their children at home “to ensure that their instruction ran parallel to their Jewish beliefs. Just weeks after an appellate judge’s verdict supported the parents’ right to homeschool their five children, Swedish government officials challenged the decision.”

The Namdars won their battle with the State, but the media and leftist political groups denounced the court decision.

Then there’s the story of Annie and Christer Johansson who had their parental rights terminated in regard to their son, Domenic.

“The boy and his parents were on board a jetliner minutes from departing Sweden for Annie’s home country of India when Domenic was seized in June 2009. The reason authorities initially gave for taking Domenic was that he had been homeschooled.

“During subsequent medical evaluations, Domenic was found to have missed some vaccinations and ‘had cavities’ in his teeth.

“During the first months following his seizure the parents were only permitted to visit Domenic once every two weeks. This quickly became once every five weeks, and in 2010 all visitations were cut off.”

Other Swedish homeschooling families have fled the country when officials threatened to levy massive fines against the parents and retaliate by way of social service directives that don’t need court-ordered permission to remove children from so-called abusive homes.

Now we are learning that the German government is clamping down on homeschooling families. In 1938, homeschooling was outlawed in Germany  by Adolf Hitler. Given what we know, the law was never rescinded, and the German government is taking full advantage of the Nazi-era law. The German Supreme Court has banned homeschooling to “counteract the development of religious and philosophically motivated parallel societies.”

Germany wants State-sanctioned conformity. Mussolini described modern-day fascistic governments like Sweden and Germany: “Everything for the State; nothing outside the State; nothing against the State.”

It’s always been the dream of tyrannical governments to eliminate all competitive thought. Adolf Hitler understood it better than anybody. The following is from William L. Shirer’s The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich:

“When an opponent declares, ‘I will not come over to your side,’ [Adolf Hitler] said in a speech on November 6, 1933, “I calmly say, ‘Your child belongs to us already. . . . What are you? You will pass on. Your descendants, however, now stand in the new camp. In a short time they will know nothing else but this new community.’” And on May 1, 1937, [Hitler] declared, “This new Reich will give its youth to no one, but will itself take youth and give to youth its own education and its own upbringing.”[1]

There is still freedom to educate our children outside the government system. It’s too bad that more parents aren’t taking advantage of that freedom. Why are young people adopting a liberal, politically progressive ideology today? Because they’ve been taught to think this way for the greater part of their young life – 6 hours each day, 5 days a week, 10 months of every year for 12 years.

If you want to change the direction of America, get them out of the government schools before you can’t.

Read more: http://godfatherpolitics.com/9694/its-ok-to-kill-your-children-but-not-educate-them/#ixzz2MXeaFJbk

 

UN Gun Grab Treaty Dead – Libs Shoot At Obama

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This is from Freedom Outpost.

The liberals have formed  circle firing squads.

The target of the shooting is Barack Milhous Capone Kardashiah.
As a Conservative Republican it id great to see the opposition shooting each other.

On July 27 the U.S., Russia, Indonasia, and India said they needed more time to think about the pact known as the United Nations Arms Trade Treaa (ATT). This officially put the threat of a gun grab off, at least for six months. It won’t keep the treaty from making a come back, but at least it is does allow us to catch a breath before the next attack.

Some of this probably had to do with the fact that the Senators were threatening to oppose the treaty.

As soon as the negotiations of the treaty had been put on suspension, gun control groups took aim and fired at Barack Obama. Turtle Bay reported,

Arms controls advocates expressed dismay over the American move, saying it could undercut momentum that has been building to establish the world’s first international treaty government the export of weapons. Before the U.S. speech, they were convinced that the United States and other big powers were on board.

We are “extremely disappointed about this outcome,” said Daryl Kimball, the director of the Arms Control Association. The failure of this treaty is “in large part due to the failure of leadership by President Obama.”

“Today the U.S. did not grab the golden ring: an international arms treaty that would have bolstered our country’s reputation as a elader on human rights,” said Scott Stedjan, senior policy advisor for Oxfam. “Moving forward, President Obama must show the political courage required to make a strong treaty that contains strong rules on human rights a reality.”

The Brady campaign was not far behind:

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence said both candidates owe voters concrete plans, and that tens of thousands of people had already signed a petition urging them to speak up. The group’s president, Dan Gross, said it was shameful for political leaders to play politics when lives could be saved.

“We truly believe, as a nation, we are better than this,” said Gross. “We’re better than a nation where shootings like the one in Aurora, Colo., happen with such frequency.”

Obama and his aides were initially tepid about calling for stricter gun regulations after 12 people were killed inside the Colorado movie theater, aware of the implications on a tight presidential race in a country where gun-rights activists have a powerful voice. But on Wednesday, Obama embraced some degree of additional restrictions, including tougher background checks.

Gross challenged Obama to move beyond rhetoric, arguing that Americans can’t be satisfied with words alone.

“The president said very similar things in his last campaign,” Gross said. “A speech is not a plan. An endorsement of a measure is not a solution.”

Isn’t it great to watch liberals attack each other? I say we need to see this a lot more often. Maybe they will be each other’s own demise in the end and we can get back to a truly Constitutional form of limited government and liberty for all.

 

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