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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 76th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

 

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 75th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

Remembering Pearl Harbor

4 Comments

 

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 74th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

10 Inventors Who Came to Regret Their Creations

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This is from Mental Floss.

A very diverse list of inventors that came to despise their inventions.

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IMAGE CREDIT: MITCHELLJOYCE

Just because someone’s invented something, it doesn’t mean that they’re happy with the end result.

1. J. ROBERT OPPENHEIMER/ ALBERT EINSTEIN — THE ATOMIC BOMB.

It’s J. Robert Oppenheimer who, as director of the Los Alamos Laboratory during World War II, is credited with the creation of the atomic bomb. But Albert Einstein’s work made it possible.

Despite past associations with left wing organizations, Oppenheimer welcomed the opportunity to play a part in the war effort. Later, however, he had mixed feelings about the bomb. “I have no remorse about the making of the bomb… As for how we used it, I understand why it happened and appreciate with what nobility those men with whom I’d worked made their decision. But I do not have the feeling that it was done right. The ultimatum to Japan [the Potsdam Proclamation demanding Japan’s surrender] was full of pious platitudes. …our government should have acted with more foresight and clarity in telling the world and Japan what the bomb meant,” he said.

Einstein was less equivocal. Years later he regretted having signed a letter to President Roosevelt urging him to support the research of physicists into nuclear chain reactions and their use as a weapon, because he believed the Germans were already working on it. “Had I known that the Germans would not succeed in producing an atomic bomb,” he said, “I would have never lifted a finger.”

2. MIKHAIL KALASHNIKOV — AK-47.

Kalashnikov designed the semi-automatic rifle that bore his name for the Russian army at the end of the Second World War after witnessing terrible casualties in battle and being injured himself. Designed to be a simple automatic rifle that could be made cheaply using the mass production methods available at the time, Kalashnikov, who died in 2014, lived long enough to see his creation be responsible for more deaths than any other assault rifle.

“I keep coming back to the same questions. If my rifle claimed people’s lives, can it be that I…, an Orthodox believer, am to blame for their deaths, even if they are my enemies?” he wrote in a letter to the head of the Russian Orthodox church in 2010.

3. TIM BERNERS LEE — THE DOUBLE SLASH.

Given what Sir Tim did for all of us when he developed HTML and created the World Wide Web, he’s got a fair amount of credit in the bank. If he did have any major regrets about the web, we wouldn’t find it too difficult to forgive him, but his mea culpa relates to only two characters, the ‘//’ at the beginning of every web address. “Really, if you think about it, it doesn’t need the //. I could have designed it not to have the //,” he said, according to Business Insider.

4. ETHAN ZUCKERMAN — THE POP-UP ADVERT.

If you’ve ever found yourself yelling at your computer screen in frustration as yet another pop-up ad leaps into view, obscuring the content behind it, Zuckerman is the person to blame.

Now head of the Center for Civic Media at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Zuckerman wrote an essay for The Atlantic last year entitled “The Internet’s Original Sin,” in which he took full responsibility for the pesky blighters. Working as an employee of web host Tripod at the time, Zuckerman explained that the company, which provided free web pages for consumers, had spent five years looking for a way to generate revenue.

“At the end of the day, the business model that got us funded was advertising. The model that got us acquired was analyzing users’ personal homepages so we could better target ads to them. Along the way, we ended up creating one of the most hated tools in the advertiser’s toolkit: the pop-up ad.”

Explaining that the intention had been to allow adverts to appear when users visited a page without necessarily associating the advert with the content of the page, Zuckerman explained, “We came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal sex. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good.”

5. DONG NGUYEN — FLAPPY BIRD.

Flappy Bird was a sensation a year ago. What looked like a crude and simple game proved to be hugely addictive thanks to it hitting that sweetspot between infuriatingly difficulty and being just playable enough to make you think that next time you’ll do better. Downloads soared and controversy raged until, after 50 million downloads and advertising revenue that was hitting around $45,000 a day, Nguyen had had enough and announced that he was going to withdraw it from app stores. “I cannot take this anymore,” he tweeted. Apparently, the publicity generated by the game had attracted the attention of the world’s press and Nguyen was bombarded with calls, tweets, and emails.

The removal of the game from app stores did little to quell the publicity. Nguyen received death threats, while phones with the game already installed sold on eBay for small fortunes, and app stores were flooded with copycat titles.

6. BOB PROPST — THE OFFICE CUBICLE.

While working as a consultant for Herman Miller in the 1960s, Bob Propst introduced America to the open plan office and with it, the office cubicle. It was, he told the New York Times in 1997, designed to “give knowledge workers a more flexible, fluid environment than the rat-maze boxes of offices.”

Companies saw his invention as a way to save money,  doing away with individual offices and replacing them with open plans and cubicles. Propst came to lament his invention. “The cubiclizing of people in modern corporations is monolithic insanity,” he said.

7. VINCENT CONNARE — COMIC SANS.

“If you love it, you don’t know much about typography.” An anonymous critic of the font Comic Sans didn’t say that, for those are the words of its designer, Vincent Connare, talking to the Wall Street Journal. Connare followed up that comment, however, with this: “If you hate it, you really don’t know much about typography, either, and you should get another hobby.”

Connare’s view, and one shared by lots of others, is that the problem with Comic Sans is not with the font itself, but its overuse and misuse. Designed for a Microsoft application aimed at children to be used as a replacement in speech bubbles for Times New Roman, Connare never imagined it would become so widely used and derided.

8. TOM KAREN — RALEIGH CHOPPER.

Before the BMX arrived on the scene in the late 1970s, if you wanted a bike that wasn’t of the drop-handlebarred racing variety, Raleigh’s Chopper (pictured up top) was one of the few options. Loved by millions for its comfortable saddle, laid-back seating position, and those huge Harley Davidson-esque handlebars, it was one of Raleigh’s best-selling bikes in the 1970s.

However, its designer, Tom Karen, wasn’t enthusiastic when a comeback for the Chopper was mooted last year. He told The Telegraph: “The Chopper wasn’t a very good bike. It was terribly heavy so you wouldn’t want to ride it very far. There was some guy who rode it from Land’s End to John O’Groats for a good cause and by the end he was cursing it.”

9. KAMRAN LOGHMAN — PEPPER SPRAY.

Kamran Loghman worked for the FBI in the 1980s and helped turn pepper spray into weapons grade material. He also wrote the guide for police departments on how it should be used. The spray has been used numerous times by police in the US, but following an incident at the University of California in 2011 when police sprayed the bright orange chemical on what theNew York Times described as “docile protestors,” Loghman spoke out. “I have never seen such an inappropriate and improper use of chemical agents,” he told the Times.

10. JOHN SYLVAN — COFFEE CAPSULES.

When John Sylvan invented coffee pouches and machines which could turn them into steaming cups of joe, he had no idea of the monster he had created. Sylvan’s invention gave rise to systems like Nespresso and Tassimo and made it easier than ever for millions of us grab a regular caffeine fix. “I feel bad sometimes that I ever did it,” he said a few years ago. “It’s like a cigarette for coffee, a singleserve delivery mechanism for an addictive substance.”

This story originally appeared on our UK site.

August 4, 2015 – 2:41pm

Abe says statement on 70th anniversary of surrender will express remorse

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This is from The Japan Times.

I doubt the statement will be a true statement of regret.

Japan was never held to the same standard for punishment for war crimes as was the Germans.

The Japs were as brutal as the Nazi’s if not, as in many cases worse.

 

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Monday he will express remorse for Japan’s actions in World War II while highlighting the country’s bid to contribute more actively to world peace in his statement marking the 70th anniversary of the war’s end in August.

“I would like to write of Japan’s remorse over the war, its postwar history as a pacifist nation and how it will contribute to the Asia-Pacific region and the world,” Abe said in Ise, Mie Prefecture, during his first news conference of the year.

To mark the anniversary, the government is preparing to craft a new statement, a document that will be closely watched due to the implications it could to have on relations with China and South Korea.

Beijing and Seoul will be paying especially close attention to whether Abe will uphold the 1995 Murayama statement, an apology for Japan’s wartime aggression in Asia, issued by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama.

On the 50th anniversary of the war’s end on Aug. 15, 1995, Murayama said Japan caused “tremendous damage and suffering” to the people of Asia and other countries through its colonial rule and aggression, and expressed “feelings of deep remorse” and “heartfelt apology.”

The statement is often quoted as the official position of the government on World War II.

Asked if he would uphold the Murayama statement, Abe said his administration “has and will uphold statements issued by past administrations.”

He also said his statement will touch on Japan’s determination to be a proactive contributor to world peace.

Abe’s first news conference of the year was held after he visited Ise Shrine, which is dedicated to the ancestral deities of the Imperial family. Prime ministers in the past have visited the shrine at the beginning of the year.

Abe also reiterated his commitment to beating deflation and reviving the economy by pressing ahead with his “Abenomics” policies.

“We will try to quickly implement the economic stimulus package compiled at the end of last year and make Abenomics bear fruit,” he said.

“I will try to use the regular Diet session (to be convened later this month) to implement various reforms,” Abe said, citing work on national security legislation, regional economies and the empowerment of women.

Earlier Monday, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said in a speech at the prime minister’s office that the adminstration will continue to give top priority to the economy.

“During the regular Diet session, we need to pass various bills while seeking an early passage of the fiscal 2015 budget,” Kono, the top government spokesman, said.

Political parties also marked the start of work in 2015.

Komeito, the junior coalition partner of Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party, held a meeting of its executives in Tokyo.

“It’s the most important event in the first half of this year — a battle to strengthen our party’s cohesion,” Komeito leader Natsuo Yamaguchi said, referring to nationwide local elections scheduled for April.

Speaking at a meeting of the main opposition Democratic Party of Japan, Secretary-General Yukio Edano expressed hope that the party will make big leaps this year in meeting people’s expectations.

“There will be an Upper House election next year, which could turn out to be a double election (also for the Lower House), so whether we can take the next big step depends on this year,” Edano said.

The DPJ is scheduled to hold an election Jan. 18 to pick the successor to Banri Kaieda, who resigned as party president after losing his Lower House seat in the December election.

So far, former DPJ Secretary-General Goshi Hosono, acting party leader Katsuya Okada and former Health, Labor and Welfare Minister Akira Nagatsuma have announced their candidacy for the top slot.

First Person: Sober Imagery of Pearl Harbor Remains with WWII Navy Veteran

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This is from Yahoo News.

We have one man’s story of  how his life changed.

 

Ted Sherman in his U.S. Navy uniform in 1942. (Photo courtesy of Ted Sherman)

 

Yahoo News asked Americans deeply impacted by the Dec. 7, 1941,Pearl Harbor attacks to share how their families were affected in the decades since. Here’s one story.

FIRST PERSON | I was with a group of high school friends at a Sunday afternoon movie in 1941 when the screen suddenly went dark. The manager then came on stage and announced that Pearl Harbor had been attacked by the Japanese. Ironically, the movie was “Sergeant York,” about a World War I hero.

We never saw the rest of the movie, and we all gathered outside. Most of us had never heard of Pearl Harbor, and as the implications of the attack became clear, we were fired with the growing anger that was just beginning to sweep across the country. I was 16, one of the youngest in our senior class of mostly 17- and 18-year-olds. The conversation soon moved on to how soon we could get into the fight. Some of the older boys talked about quitting school to enlist.

Our senior class trip to Washington, D.C., was scheduled for just a week later. Fortunately, it wasn’t cancelled and we stayed at the Mayflower Hotel for three nights. Our tour of the city’s historic buildings had some grim sights. Some of them, if they’d happen today would look almost comical. We saw many soldiers in World War I helmets with loaded rifles and machine guns guarding roofs and entrances. There was confusion everywhere in the Capitol, and it was obvious the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor had been a total surprise to a woefully unprepared nation.

Along with thousands of other young men, my 19-year-old brother had rushed down to an Army recruiting office on Monday, Dec. 8, morning to enlist. That was the day President Roosevelt made a speech in Congress and declared war on Japan for the “dastardly” attack on Pearl Harbor.

I had to wait an anxious year to get into it, and finally was able to join the Navy. After boot camp in 1943, I was assigned as a crewman on a troop transport. While carrying Marines to the Pacific battles, we sailed through Pearl Harbor. It was two years after the attack, and much of the damage had been repaired.

However, as we passed by the site, we could still see the grim image of the destroyed battleship USS Arizona just below the surface. There were bubbles of escaping oil still breaking the surface. It was as if the ghosts of the 1,177 sailors below were urging us to remember Pearl Harbor.

10 RARE AND UNSEEN PICS AFTER PEARL HARBOR

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This is from Breitbarts Big Peace.

While clicking other links I found these pictures.

 

Exactly 72 years ago today, Japan launched more than 350 fighters, bombers, and torpedo planes against the U.S. naval base in Hawaii–a “date which will live in infamy,” in the words of President Franklin Roosevelt. In fact, that Sunday morning is so seared into America‘s memory that the tumult of the weeks and months afterward is often overlooked. Here, on the 72nd anniversary of Pearl Harbor, LIFE.com presents rare and unpublished photos from Hawaii and the mainland, chronicling a nation’s answer to an unprecedented act of war.

 

Unpublished, a rally at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Dec. 1941. 

The Brooklyn Navy Yard was founded in 1801. It had contributed ships to every American conflict, including the War of 1812, the Civil War, and World War I. It would prove absolutely essential to the war effort during World War II.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, young defenders beside a mounted machine gun, Hawaii, Dec. 1941.

“Close observers of Japan,” LIFE noted in mid-1941, “have said for years that if that country ever found itself in a hopeless corner it was capable of committing national hara-kiri by flinging itself at the throat of its mightiest enemy … [On December 7] it took the desperate plunge and told its enemies in effect: “If this be hara-kiri, make the most of it.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

Unpublished, Vice Admiral Joseph “Bull” Reeves, Waikiki Beach, Dec. 1941. 

While the U.S. was stunned by the attack on Pearl Harbor, the nation’s political and military leaders had long been conscious of tensions with Japan — which was obviously gearing up for war long before December 1941. An example of the measures the U.S. took in expectation of some sort of conflict in the Pacific: Joseph “Bull” Reeves, retired since 1936, was recalled to active duty in 1940. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, he was already 69.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, Pearl Harbor, Dec. 1941.

At the time of the attack, there were roughly 50,000 troops based at Pearl Harbor. Afterwards the number of soldiers spiked, as there were several hundred thousand of them stationed in Hawaii by 1945. (The number dropped to less than 70,000 by 1946.) “Out of the Pacific skies last week,” LIFE magazine wrote in its December 15, 1941 issue, “World War II came with startling suddenness to America … With reckless daring Japan aimed this blow at the citadel of American power in the Pacific.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, training with gas masks in Hawaii, early 1942.

“Ambassador Nomura and Envoy Kurusu,” LIFE reported in mid-December 1941, “had come with the answer to Hull’s note [of protest to the Japanese delegation in D.C.]. Hull read it through and then, for the first time in many long, patient years, the soft-spoken Secretary lost his temper. Into the teeth of the two Japanese, who for once did not grin, he flung these words: “In all my 50 years of public service I have never seen a document that was more crowded with infamous falsehoods and distortions — on a scale so huge that I never imagined until today that any government on this planet was capable of uttering them.”

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, troops shore up defenses in Hawaii in the weeks after Pearl Harbor. 

World War II lasted four more years — until Germany surrendered in May of 1945 and Japan surrendered in September of that year, in the wake of America’s destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The attack on Pearl Harbor, meanwhile — rather than Japan’s greatest victory — turned out to be an act of belligerent folly that, in many ways, guaranteed Japan’s eventual defeat.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

No Job Too Small — Dec. 1942

A Naval officer — dwarfed by the vessel in his view — gazes at a cruiser’s propeller at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. During the course of World War II, more than 5,000 Allied ships were brought to Brooklyn for repairs.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

Unpublished, a poster at the Brooklyn Navy Yard calls for vigilance, Dec. 1941.

Within days of the attack, while the eyes of America were understandably focused on Pearl Harbor and the Pacific, a naval yard in New York City was already ramping up for what looked to be a long, long war.

Source: George Strock/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

A closer look at the USS Arizona‘s wreckage, 1942.

Source: Bob Landry/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 


“U.S. aircraft rose at once to repel the Japanese attack,” LIFE wrote in December 1941, overstating the efficacy of the American response to the assault. In fact, more than 2,400 Americans (including scores of civilians) were killed in the attack; hundreds of U.S. aircraft were destroyed. In contrast, fewer than 70 Japanese were killed. The American response to the massive, sudden attack was unquestionably stalwart; but there’s also little question that, in terms of sheer losses, America endured a hellish blow.

Source: William C. Shrout/TIME & LIFE Pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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