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John Wayne – The Hyphen

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Racism in America is a two way street, If you are honest with yourself you’ll never look at or use the words American-American, Mexican-American, Asian-America again.

When you say “I’m an African-American, I’m a Mexican-American etc..” what you are really saying is you hate America for what she represents whether it be white, black, yellow or brown America.

You are saying you are a racist and have no intention of being otherwise!

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John Wayne: Why Are You Marching, Son?

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Tribute to American veterans, from the 1973 John Wayne RCA record “America, Why I Love Her”.

COMMENTARY: Sheriff’s Call To Arms – Citizens Need To Protect Themselves

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This is from The Daily Surge.

https://t.reembed.com/2hQoWD3IrcLD2iKE1g0VdbHq

Good Sheriffs are happy to have citizens armed and ready to protect themselves.

It’s becoming a mantra. “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun, is a good guy with a gun.” For much of America that rings true. Gun sales have been skyrocketing, and not hunting rifles. People have been buying carry guns. That’s right, small pistols to be carried daily for self-protection is what people want. Pink ones, silver ones, black ones it doesn’t matter as long as they can take out a bad guy.

Sales spike right along with each new piece of gun control to come out of Washington and every time we have another shooting incident. Americans want to be able to protect themselves in the 5 to 10 minutes while the police are on their way.

America has the best law enforcement in the entire world. That is not an overstatement. We are so much safer than 99% of the rest of the world it’s not even funny. Average response times to a 911 call really are around 5 to 10 minutes. That’s unheard of anywhere but America.

Even with how awesome that is, a lot of violence can take place in five minutes. A lone gunman can kill unknown numbers of people in one minute let alone five. So what is the average citizen to do in that five minutes? Kneel and pray? Run and hide? Throw shoes or a purse at the bad guy? Offer him counseling? Without a weapon those are the choices.

Americans still like John Wayne movies. We really like war movies too. We pretty much like to kickass and win in the end. As a people, we don’t like to kneel. That’s why we kicked out the English and became free. Free to die standing up. Free to die shooting back.

Give us our liberty or give is our death. Personal protection is the root of the Second Amendment, not hunting. I love hunting, but I like protecting my family more. I love this country because it allows me to carry a gun and bridge that gap until the cops show up. If the world turns crazy and the lead starts flying, I’m glad to know that I could at least give it a shot (no pun intended) at taking out the bad guy first.

I’d rather take one to the chest than the back of the head. I’d rather face my attacker while my kids try to escape. Those of us who carry know if we ever are in that situation, our survival chances aren’t great. Most likely the perpetrator will be much more heavily armed than whatever we are carrying, but it’s better than an empty hand, which is what most Democrat politicians would like us to have.

Most of my cop friends are all for smart, responsible, men and women carrying weapons. They know they can’t be there in time. They want you to survive too. They want the bad guy down. Smart Sheriffs want an armed citizenry because they know it cuts down on crime in general.

I found this article from the Washington Post titled, Sheriffs Issue Call To Arms: Take Advantage Of Your Legal Right To Carry A Firearm, because a Sheriff I know actually posted it to his Facebook page. He’s obviously got a pair and doesn’t give a crap about being politically correct. He’s also got the respect of his county and many in our state. It’s a fantastic article full of facts, statistics, and videos from other law enforcement on the virtues of being armed.

One sheriff called his citizens “the first line of defense.” He’s a smart sheriff.

Armed citizen’s help make the world safer and cops jobs easier. When an armed citizen is around and some psycho terrorist opens fire, after it’s over there will be no need to question the bad guy or cuff him, just put tape around him and get a mop.
Read more at http://dailysurge.com/2016/02/24485/

 

I Don’t Carry A Gun

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This is why myself and many people carry a gun.
I have taken a lot of flak because of my guns.
I get comments like He is John Wayne or Ronald Reagan.
I can only wish I was half the Patriot either of these men were.
I don’t carry a gun to kill people.
I carry a gun to keep from being killed.
I don’t carry a gun to scare people.
I carry a gun because sometimes this world can be a scary place.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m paranoid.
I carry a gun because there are real threats in the world.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m evil.
I carry a gun because I have lived long enough to see the evil in the world.
I don’t carry a gun because I hate the government.
I carry a gun because I understand the limitations of government.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m angry.
I carry a gun so that I don’t have to spend the rest of my life hating myself for failing to be prepared.
I don’t carry a gun because my sex organs are too small.
I carry a gun because I want to continue to use those sex organs for the purpose for which they were intended for a good long time to come.
I don’t carry a gun because I want to shoot someone.
I carry a gun because I want to die at a ripe old age in my bed, and not on a sidewalk somewhere tomorrow afternoon.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m a cowboy.
I carry a gun because, when I die and go to heaven, I want to be a cowboy.
I don’t carry a gun to make me feel like a man.
I carry a gun because men know how to take care of themselves and the ones they love.
I don’t carry a gun because I feel inadequate.
I carry a gun because unarmed and facing three armed thugs, I am inadequate.
I don’t carry a gun because I love it.
I carry a gun because I love life and the people who make it meaningful to me.

Maureen O’Hara, spirited movie star, dies at 95

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This is from Fox News.

R.I.P. Katherine (Maureen O’Hara)McClintock.

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John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara

Maureen O’Hara, the flame-haired Irish movie star who appeared in classics ranging from the grim “How Green Was My Valley” to the uplifting “Miracle on 34th Street” and bantered unforgettably with John Wayne in several films. She was 95.

O’Hara died in her sleep at her home in Boise, Idaho, said Johnny Nicoletti, her longtime manager.

“She passed peacefully surrounded by her loving family as they celebrated her life listening to music from her favorite movie, `The Quiet Man,”‘ said a statement from her family.

“As an actress, Maureen O’Hara brought unyielding strength and sudden sensitivity to every role she played. Her characters were feisty and fearless, just as she was in real life.  She was also proudly Irish and spent her entire lifetime sharing her heritage and the wonderful culture of the Emerald Isle with the world,” said a family biography.

O’Hara came to Hollywood to star in the 1939 “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” and went on to a long career.

During her movie heyday, she became known as the Queen of Technicolor because of the camera’s love affair with her vivid hair, pale complexion and fiery nature.

After her start in Hollywood with “Hunchback” and some minor films at RKO, she was borrowed by 20th Century Fox to play the beautiful young daughter in the 1941 saga of a coal-mining family, “How Green Was My Valley.”

“How Green Was My Valley” went on to win five Oscars including best picture and best director for John Ford, beating out Orson Welles and “Citizen Kane” among others. It was the first of several films she made under the direction of Ford, who grouchy nature seemed to melt in her presence.

The popularity of “How Green Was My Valley” confirmed O’Hara’s status as a Hollywood star. RKO and Fox shared her contract, and her most successful films were made at Fox.

They included “Miracle on 34th Street,” the classic 1947 Christmas story in which O’Hara was little Natalie Wood’s skeptical mother and among those charmed by Edmund Gwenn as a man who believed he was Santa Claus.

Other films included the costume drama “The Foxes of Harrow” (Rex Harrison, 1947); the comedy “Sitting Pretty” (Clifton Webb, 1948); and the sports comedy “Father Was a Fullback” (Fred MacMurray, 1949).

Often she sailed the high seas in colorful pirate adventures such as “The Black Swan” with Tyrone Power, “The Spanish Main” with Paul Henreid, “Sinbad the Sailor” with Douglas Fairbanks Jr., and “Against All Flags” with Errol Flynn.

With Ford’s “Rio Grande” in 1950, O’Hara became Wayne’s favorite leading lady. The most successful of their five films was the 1952 “The Quiet Man,” also directed by Ford, in which she matched Wayne blow for blow in a classic donnybrook.

With her Irish spunk, she could stand up to the rugged Duke, both on and off screen. She was proud when he remarked in an interview that he preferred to work with men — “except for Maureen O’Hara; she’s a great guy.”

“We met through Ford, and we hit it right off,” she remarked in 1991. “I adored him, and he loved me. But we were never sweethearts. Never, ever.”

O’Hara’s other movies with Wayne were “The Wings of Eagles” (1957), “McClintock!” (1963) and “Big Jake” (1971).

After her studio contracts ended, she remained busy. She played the mother of twins, both played by Hayley Mills, who conspire to reunite their divorced parents in the 1961 Disney comedy “The Parent Trap.”

She was also in “Spencer’s Mountain” with Henry Fonda (1963), a precursor to TV’s “The Waltons”; and a Western, “The Rare Breed,” with James Stewart (1966).

In 1968, she married her third husband, Brig. Gen. Charles Blair. After “Big Jake,” she quit movies to live with him in the Virgin Islands, where he operated an airline. He died in a plane crash in 1978.

“Being married to Charlie Blair and traveling all over the world with him, believe me, was enough for any woman,” she said in a 1995 Associated Press interview. “It was the best time of my life.”

She returned to movies in 1991 for a role that writer-director Chris Columbus had written especially for her, as John Candy’s feisty mother in a sentimental drama, “Only the Lonely.” It was not a box-office success.

Over the following decade, she did three TV movies: “The Christmas Box,” based on a best-selling book, a perennial holiday attraction; “Cab to Canada,” a road picture; and “The Last Dance.”

While making “The Christmas Box” in 1995, she admitted that roles for someone her age (75), were scarce: “The older a man gets, the younger the parts that he plays. The older a woman gets, you’ve got to find parts that are believable. Since I’m not a frail character, it’s not that easy.”

Maureen FitzSimons  was born in 1920 near Dublin, Ireland. Her mother was a well-known opera singer, and her father owned a string of soccer teams. Through her father, she learned to love sports; through her mother, she and her five siblings were exposed to the theater.

“My first ambition was to be the No. 1 actress in the world,” she recalled in 1999. “And when the whole world bowed at my feet, I would retire in glory and never do anything again.”

Maureen was admitted to the training program at Dublin’s famed Abbey Theater, where she was a prize student. When word of the beautiful Irish teen reached London, she was offered a screen test, and a friend convinced her reluctant parents to allow it.

Maureen considered the test a failure, but it led to a few small roles in English films. The great actor Charles Laughton, who was producing and starring in films made in England, saw the test and was intrigued by her dancing eyes. At 17 she co-starred opposite him in a pirate yarn, “Jamaica Inn,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Laughton gave her a more manageable name: O’Hara.

With the onslaught of World War II, filmmaking virtually halted in England. Laughton moved to RKO in Hollywood and starred as Quasimodo in “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” with O’Hara as the beautiful gypsy girl, Esmeralda.

Her first husband was director George Hanley Brown, whom she met while making “Jamaica Inn.” When she moved to Hollywood, he remained in England and the marriage was annulled.

In 1941, she married a tall, handsome director, Will Price, and they had a daughter, Bronwyn, in 1944. “The marriage was a terrible mistake, and we divorced in 1952,” she said. She remained unmarried until the wedding to Blair in 1968.

After his death, she continued living for many years in St. Croix, Virgin Islands, spending summers in Ireland. More recently, she lived much of the time with a grandson in Scottsdale, Ariz., though she kept a condo in St. Croix.

O’Hara’s career was threatened by a manufactured scandal in 1957, when Confidential magazine claimed she and a lover engaged in “the hottest show in town” in a back row in Hollywood’s Grauman’s Chinese Theater.

But at the time, she told AP, “I was making a movie in Spain, and I had the passport to prove it.” She testified against the magazine in a criminal libel trial and brought a lawsuit that was settled out of court. The magazine eventually went out of business.

On the screen, O’Hara always played strong, willful women. In a 1991 interview, she was asked if she was the same woman she appeared in movies.

“I do like to get my own way,” she said. “But don’t think I’m not acting when I’m up there. And don’t think I always get my own way. There have been crushing disappointments. But when that happens, I say, `Find another hill to climb.”‘

She is survived by her daughter, Bronwyn FitzSimons of Glengarriff, Ireland; her grandson, Conor FitzSimons of Boise and two great-grandchildren.

TOP 10: MEMORABLE JOHN WAYNE QUOTES

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This is from Warrior Scout.

36 years ago today we lost a Great American and a Great Patriot Marion Robert Morrison aka John “The Duke” Wayne.

I can think of one more quote by The Duke, Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid.

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On this day in 1979, the world said goodbye to John Wayne. Here’s a list of 10 of the most memorable things the Duke ever said.

Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, in 1907, Wayne and his family moved to California when he was still a child. Rejected by the Naval Academy and eager to make his mark, Wayne eventually enrolled at USC where he played football.

Wayne soon landed a gig as a prop boy on Hollywood sets, where he impressed director John Ford. With his imposing frame (he stood six feet four), good looks, and lantern jaw, Wayne quickly established himself as a budding star. And box office gold.

The Duke would eventually star in more than 140 motion pictures in his Hollywood career, and he remains one of the most enduring icons of American ruggedness, individualism, and masculinity.

Wayne died of stomach cancer on June 11, 1979, in Los Angeles Calif.

A look back on ten of his greatest quotes.

  1. “Young fella, if you’re looking for trouble, I’ll accommodate ya.” – As Rooster Cogburn in the 1969 film True Grit, directed by Henry Hathaway

  1. “I won’t be wronged, I won’t be insulted, and I won’t be laid a hand on. I don’t do these things to other people, and I require the same from them.” – As J.B Books in the 1976 film The Shootist , directed by Don Siegel

  1. “I wouldn’t make it a habit of calling me that son.” – As Wil Anderson in 1972 film The Cowboys, 1972, directed by Mark Rydell

  1. “Well, there are some things a man just can’t run away from.” – As the Ringo Kid in the 1939 film Stagecoach, directed by John Ford

  1. “Out here a man settles his own problems.” – As Tom Doniphon in the 1962 film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, directed by John Ford

  1. “Sorry don’t get it done, Dude.” – As Sheriff John T. Chance is the 1959 film Rio Bravo, directed by John Ford

  1. “I’ve made over 250 pictures and have never shot a guy in the back. Change it.” – Statement made by John Wayne while shooting the 1976 film The Shootist, directed by Don Siegel

  1. “Now you understand. Anything goes wrong, anything at all…your fault, my fault, nobody’s fault…it don’t matter…I’m gonna blow your head off. It’s as simple as that.” – As Jacob McCandles in the 1971 film Big Jake, directed by George Sherman

  1. “If I had known that I would have put that patch on 35 years earlier.” Statement made by John Wayne while accepting the Oscar for his leading role in the 1969 film True Grit, directed by Henry Hathaway

  1. “All battles are fought by scared men who’d rather be some place else.”- As Capt. Rock Well Torrey in the 1965 film In Harm’s Way, directed by Otto Preminger

AND JUST FOR FUN

“Out here, due process is a bullet!”- As Col. Mike Kirby in the 1968 film The Green Berets, 1968, directed by Ray Kellogg

 

The Inside Story of the Wendy’s ‘Where’s the Beef?’ Ad, 30 Years Later

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This is from Yahoo TV. 

This is one of my favorite commercials along with John Wayne and Gunny Ermey in the Coors commercial.

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Clara Peller in the “Where’s the Beef?” ad

Travel back with us to 1984, to a time when a simple question could spark a nationwide meat-craving frenzy.

Thirty years ago this week, Wendy’s debuted their now-iconic “Where’s the Beef?” commercial, starring Clara Peller as an old lady demanding more meat from her fast-food hamburger. And a classic ’80s catchphrase was born.

The ad, originally titled “Fluffy Bun,” was the brainchild of top-tier agency Dancer Fitzgerald Sample (also responsible for Toyota’s “Oh, What a Feeling!” campaign), and featured three white-haired grannies examining a new burger — with a tiny patty and a huge bun — from an unnamed restaurant, the “Home of the Big Bun.”

While the other two women admired the “big, fluffy bun,” Peller wasn’t satisfied, croaking the immortal query, “Where’s the beef?” (Interestingly, Wendy’s first tried a version with a bald man uttering the line, but it failed to catch on.) The catchphrase was a sharp jab at competitors Burger King and McDonald’s, allowing Wendy’s to trumpet the fact that their burgers had more beef than the Whopper or Big Mac.

Hitting the airwaves on January 10, 1984, “Where’s the Beef?” was an instant sensation, spawning a series of Peller-starring sequels along with a raft of merchandise, from T-shirts to bumper stickers to Frisbees to a board game. Peller even recorded a “Where’s the Beef?” novelty single with Nashville disc jockey Coyote McCloud.

The ad was credited with boosting Wendy’s annual revenue by a whopping 31 percent, and made its way into the 1984 presidential campaign: Walter Mondale invoked “Where’s the Beef?” to slam rival Gary Hart’s lack of substance during the Democratic primary. Mondale went on to lose in a landslide to incumbent Ronald Reagan; the ad’s director Joe Sedelmaier said at the time, “If Walter Mondale could have said the line like Clara, he would have been our President.”

 

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE -- Episode 17 -- Pictured: Clara Peller during the 'White House Foods' skit on April 14, 1984 -- Photo by: Al Levine/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank

Clara Peller (AP)

Even better than the story behind the ad is that of its unlikely star, Clara Peller. A Chicago native, the 4-foot-10-inch Peller worked as a manicurist for 35 years before being “discovered” in a local commercial at the age of 80.

She was 81 when the Wendy’s ad debuted and thoroughly enjoyed her overnight celebrity: She appeared on numerous TV talk shows, made a cameo on “Saturday Night Live,” and even served as a guest time-keeper for the battle royale at Wrestlemania 2.

Here she is being interviewed by Bryant Gumbel on NBC’s “Today

Sadly, the relationship between Peller and Wendy’s soured when Peller repeated her famous catchphrase in a 1985 ad for Prego spaghetti sauce (and then declared “I found it!”), leading Wendy’s to terminate her contract for violating a non-compete clause. Peller responded, “I’ve made them millions, and they don’t appreciate me.” (Peller was only paid scale for the initial commercial, but earned tens of thousands more from subsequent Wendy’s ads and merchandise royalties.)

Peller passed away in 1987 at the age of 85, and Wendy’s struggled until launching a new ad campaign starring founder Dave Thomas in 1989. The chain actually resurrected the “Where’s the Beef?” taglinein 2011 to promote their new Hot ‘N Juicy Cheeseburgers, answering the question with a definitive “Here’s the beef.”

And three decades later, “Where’s the Beef?” lives on as one of the most memorable TV commercials of all time. Ad Age named it one of the top ten ad slogans of the 20th century, and it helped build Wendy’s from an upstart fast-food joint into the third-largest burger chain in the world. Not bad for three little words from an 81-year-old manicurist.

A Final Salute To Veterans

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This is from John Wayne’s 1973 “America Why I Love Her!”

 

 

This is by The Statler Brothers More Than A Name On A Wall

 

 

Last but not least Taps by John Wayne in 1973

 

Just Watch Oprah’s Reaction After Actress Rejects Labels and Declares Herself Not ‘African-American’

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This is from The Blaze.

I applaud Raven’s stand on being a hyphenated American we are Americans first and foremost.

Be proud of your heritage, but first and foremost, you are an American..

Here is John Waynes take on hyphenated Americans.

 

Actress and singer Raven-Symone left Oprah Winfrey visibly surprised during an interview when she explained that she’s “tired of being labeled” and considers herself “American,” not “African-American.”

Raven, who is best known for her roles on “The Cosby Show” and “That’s So Raven,” said she doesn’t want to be labeled as “gay” either, because she is just a “human who loves humans.”

“I’m tired of being labeled. I’m an American. I’m not an African-American; I’m an American,” she said.

“Oh, girl, don’t set up Twitter on fire,” Winfrey responded. “Oh, my lord. What did you just say?”

(OWN)

Raven continued: “I mean, I don’t know where my roots go to. I don’t know how far back they goI don’t know what country in Africa I’m from, but I do know that my roots are in Louisiana. I’m an American. And that’s a colorless person.”

Winfrey then warned the entertainer that she would “get a lot of flak for saying you’re not African-American.”

“I want you to say what you really mean by that,” the host pressed.

“What I really mean by that is I’m an American. That’s what I really mean,” Raven replied. “I have darker skin. I have a nice, interesting grade of hair. I connect with caucasian. I connect with Asian. I connect with black. I connect with Indian. I connect with each culture.”

Watch part of the interview below via OWN:

I Don’t Carry A Gun

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mightylists.blogspot.com photo credit

ludlowcollection.culturenikphoto credit

This is why myself and many people carry a gun.
I have taken a lot of flak because of my guns.
I get comments like He is John Wayne or Ronald Reagan.
I can only wish I was half the Patriot either of these men were.
I have heard you carry a gun because you’re paranoid my response I carry a gun “So what in the Hell do I have to be paranoid about.”
I don’t carry a gun to kill people.
I carry a gun to keep from being killed.
I don’t carry a gun to scare people.
I carry a gun because sometimes this world can be a scary place.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m paranoid.
I carry a gun because there are real threats in the world.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m evil.
I carry a gun because I have lived long enough to see the evil in the world.
I don’t carry a gun because I hate the government.
I carry a gun because I understand the limitations of government.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m angry.
I carry a gun so that I don’t have to spend the rest of my life hating myself for failing to be prepared.
I don’t carry a gun because my sex organs are too small.
I carry a gun because I want to continue to use those sex organs for the purpose for which they were intended for a good long time to come.
I don’t carry a gun because I want to shoot someone.
I carry a gun because I want to die at a ripe old age in my bed, and not on a sidewalk somewhere tomorrow afternoon.
I don’t carry a gun because I’m a cowboy.
I carry a gun because, when I die and go to heaven, I want to be a cowboy.
I don’t carry a gun to make me feel like a man.
I carry a gun because men know how to take care of themselves and the ones they love.
I don’t carry a gun because I feel inadequate.
I carry a gun because unarmed and facing three armed thugs, I am inadequate.
I don’t carry a gun because I love it.
I carry a gun because I love life and the people who make it meaningful to me.

 

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