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Persian Gulf Muslim States Have Accepted No Syrian Refugees

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This is from The Daily Caller. 

The Persian Gulf Arabs States do not want these so-called refugees as they know ISIS has infiltrated their ranks.

While the United States and Europe argue over how many Syrian refugees to allow in, the richest Persian Gulf states have accepted exactly zero.

The Muslim countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council that include Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and United Arab Emirates steadfastly refuse to accept any Syrian refugees. Amnesty International, USA (AIUSA) tells The Daily Caller News Foundation they have not accepted a single refugee since the armed Syrian conflict erupted years ago.

“The Gulf States have accepted zero refugees registered with the United Nations and administered through the U.N. resettlement program. They have accepted zero,” Geoffrey Mock, the Syrian country coordinator for AIUSA, tells TheDCNF.

Nadim Houry, the Human Rights Watch deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa, calls it “shameful.”

The reluctance of Muslim countries to accept Syrians also may make it much harder for Americans to accept President Barack Obama’s proposal to resettle 10,000 refugees throughout the United States.

The Gulf states can be a natural new home for many of the Syrians. The Persian Gulf countries are fabulously wealthy from oil revenues, have strong economies, speak the same Arabic language and offer a familiar culture for the displaced Syrians.

A Fox News poll taken after the Paris attacks reports 67 percent oppose taking in any of the 10,000 Syrian refugees Obama wishes to resettle in the United States. Seventy-seven percent replied that “at least one of those coming through this process will be a terrorist who will succeed in carrying out an attack on U.S. soil.”

A Harris poll taken about a week after the Paris attacks shows that six out of 10 (61 percent) oppose the president’s plan to accept 10,000 refugees. Going deeper, it shows that 63 percent fear any Syrian refugee admitted to the U.S. could be connected to terrorism.
Those fears hardened after the Nov. 13 Islamic State attack in Paris that killed 130. Many of the terrorists that night were either French or Belgian citizens.

A Bloomberg Politics post-attack public opinion poll taken Nov. 15 to 17 shows 53 percent oppose any resettlement of Syrians in the United States, with only 28 supporting the president.

On Nov. 20, the House also voted 289 to 137 to call a pause in the resettlement program until greater security measures are in place to screen the refugees. The vote included 47 Democrats joining Republicans.

Thirty-one governors vow to stop temporarily accepting Syrian refugees into their states. All of the governors are Republican except for one.

Sen. Rand Paul, the Kentucky Republican who is seeking the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, raises the issue in his campaign.

The Gulf states are the “ones actually giving a lot of arms and weapons to radical Islamists. They’re taking zero refugees,” Paul declared in a campaign stop in his home state of Kentucky Nov. 23.

Muslim countries bordering Syria such as Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon accepted the bulk of the 4.2 million Syrian refugees. Many there live in makeshift overcrowded tent cities operated by the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its resettlement agency.

Egypt, which accepted 127,000 of the 4.2 million Syrian refugees, also appears to be getting cold feet about accepting more. Egyptian officials are now expelling some refugees, according to Mock. He tells TheDCNF some refugees are on hunger strikes because of depraved conditions.

Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon have also begun to impose new restrictions on accepting more Syrian refugees.

Despite the worldwide clamor in support of the refugees, funding to help them isn’t available. UNHCR earlier this month reported that globally, governments have contributed only half of the $4.5 billion estimate of the cost of needed support for the refugees.

Like some Americans, the monarchs in the Gulf states appear to be suspicious of accepting Muslims who they fear could have a destabilizing effect on their societies.

Sultan Sooud al-Qassemi of Oman wrote last Sept. 3 in the International Business Times, “I suspect that the Gulf States may also be wary of allowing a large number of politically vocal Arabs into their countries that might somehow influence a traditionally politically-passive society.”

Further compounding the problem is that none of the Gulf states signed the 1951 Refugee Convention that defines a refugee as a person “outside the country of his nationality’ because of ‘fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality.”

Failure to sign the post-World War II convention means Gulf states don’t have to recognize the refugees and do not have to cooperate with the U.N. resettlement program.

Many of those Palestinian refugees from 1948 have not been naturalized by their own Arab governments and remain stateless people without a passport or citizenship rights in any Arab country.

Saudi Arabia, through its state-run press agency, stated it does not accept Syrian refugees but will accept Syrian citizens who want to live in “dignity” within its borders. The monarchy asserts it has accepted 2.5 million Syrians in that manner.

But Amnesty International USA says the claim refers to migrant workers who work in the kingdom for low wages. “None of them went through the U.N. resettlement process. They are migrant workers throughout the Gulf states,” Mock says.

“Just to accept those without participating in the U.N. resettlement process is not showing the leadership we think they need to be taking,” he says.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2015/11/24/persian-gulf-muslim-states-have-accepted-no-syrian-refugees/#ixzz3sqGQrHGq

 

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5 Years for Insulting Ruler: Kuwait Cracks Down on Twitter Users

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This is from The Christian Post.

Barack The Thin Skin Thug would Love to do this.

How much time could I get for my remarks?

But thank God we still have free speech for now.

A Kuwaiti man has been sentenced to 5 years for insulting the nation’s ruler on Sunday.

Mohammad Eid al-Jamie was given the maximum possible sentence for posting insulting comments on Twitter for criticizing the nation’s ruler, who is described as “immune and inviolable” in the constitution.

Attorney Mohammad al-Humaidi, director of the Kuwait Society for Human Rights, has said, “We call on the government to expand freedoms and adhere to the international (human rights) conventions it has signed,” according to Reuters.

Amnesty International has immediately spoken out against the ruling saying that the nation was clamping down on freedom of expression and assembly. It called for wider protections to be given for social media users in the country, and urged for people to be allowed to support or criticize the government if they wanted to, as long as they did not incite hatred or violence.

The practice of punishing people for social media postings has become more common in the country over recent years. In January, a Kuwaiti court sentenced two men in separate cases to jail for insulting the ruler on Twitter.

Last year in June, in another case a man was sentenced to 10 years in prison after he was charged with endangering state security by insulting the Prophet Mohammad on social media.

The prosecutions have stemmed from the nation’s security law and penal code, and Kuwait passed new legislation last year aimed at taking a stricter line in the regulation of social media websites.
Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/5-years-for-insulting-ruler-kuwait-cracks-down-on-twitter-users-89374/#V06qOAXKetLwPRxC.99

AP source: Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf dies

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This is from Yahoo News.

We have lost a True Warrior General.

RIP Stormin’ Norman.

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 1991 file photo, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf stands at ease with his tank troops during Operation Desert Storm in Saudi Arabia. Schwarzkopf died Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012 in Tampa, Fla. He was 78. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who topped an illustrious military career by commanding the U.S.-led international coalition that drove Saddam Hussein’s forces out ofKuwait in 1991 but kept a low public profile in controversies over the second Gulf War against Iraq, died Thursday. He was 78.

Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Fla., where he had lived in retirement, according to a U.S. official, who was not authorized to release the information publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

A much-decorated combat soldier in Vietnam, Schwarzkopf was known popularly as “Stormin’ Norman” for a notoriously explosive temper.

He served in his last military assignment in Tampa as commander-in-chief of U.S. Central Command, the headquarters responsible for U.S. military and security concerns in nearly 20 countries from the eastern Mediterranean and Africa to Pakistan.

Schwarzkopf became “CINC-Centcom” in 1988 and when Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait three years later to punish it for allegedly stealing Iraqi oil reserves, he commanded Operation Desert Storm, the coalition of some 30 countries organized by then-President George H.W. Bush that succeeded in driving the Iraqis out.

At the peak of his postwar national celebrity, Schwarzkopf — a self-proclaimed political independent — rejected suggestions that he run for office, and remained far more private than other generals, although he did serve briefly as a military commentator for NBC.

While focused primarily in his later years on charitable enterprises, he campaigned for President George W. Bush in 2000 but was ambivalent about the 2003 invasion of Iraq, saying he doubted victory would be as easy as the White House and Pentagon predicted. In early 2003 he told the Washington Post the outcome was an unknown:

“What is postwar Iraq going to look like, with the Kurds and the Sunnis and the Shiites? That’s a huge question, to my mind. It really should be part of the overall campaign plan,” he said.

Initially Schwarzkopf had endorsed the invasion, saying he was convinced that former Secretary of State Colin Powell had given the United Nations powerful evidence of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction. After that proved false, he said decisions to go to war should depend on what U.N. weapons inspectors found.

He seldom spoke up during the conflict, but in late 2004, he sharply criticized then-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and the Pentagon for mistakes that included inadequate training for Army reservists sent to Iraq and for erroneous judgments about Iraq.

“In the final analysis I think we are behind schedule. … I don’t think we counted on it turning into jihad (holy war),” he said in an NBC interview.

Schwarzkopf was born Aug. 24, 1934, in Trenton, N.J., where his father, Col. H. Norman Schwarzkopf Jr., founder and commander of the New Jersey State Police, was then leading the investigation of the Lindbergh kidnap case, which ended with the arrest and 1936 execution of German-born carpenter Richard Hauptmann for stealing and murdering the famed aviator’s infant son.

The elder Schwarzkopf was named Herbert, but when the son was asked what his “H” stood for, he would reply, “H.” Although reputed to be short-tempered with aides and subordinates, he was a friendly, talkative and even jovial figure who didn’t like “Stormin’ Norman” and preferred to be known as “the Bear,” a sobriquet given him by troops.

He also was outspoken at times, including when he described Gen. William Westmoreland, the U.S. commander in Vietnam, as “a horse’s ass” in an Associated Press interview.

As a teenager Norman accompanied his father to Iran, where the elder Schwarzkopf trained the country’s national police force and was an adviser to Reza Pahlavi, the young Shah of Iran.

Young Norman studied there and in Switzerland, Germany and Italy, then followed in his father’s footsteps to West Point, graduating in 1956 with an engineering degree. After stints in the U.S. and abroad, he earned a master’s degree in engineering at the University of Southern California and later taught missile engineering at West Point.

In 1966 he volunteered for Vietnam and served two tours, first as a U.S. adviser to South Vietnamese paratroops and later as a battalion commander in the U.S. Army’s Americal Division. He earned three Silver Stars for valor — including one for saving troops from a minefield — plus a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and three Distinguished Service Medals.

While many career officers left military service embittered by Vietnam, Schwarzkopf was among those who opted to stay and help rebuild the tattered Army into a potent, modernized all-volunteer force.

After Saddam invaded Kuwait in August 1990, Schwarzkopf played a key diplomatic role by helping to persuade Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd to allow U.S. and other foreign troops to deploy on Saudi territory as a staging area for the war to come.

On Jan. 17, 1991, a five-month buildup called Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm as allied aircraft attacked Iraqi bases and Baghdad government facilities. The six-week aerial campaign climaxed with a massive ground offensive on Feb. 24-28, routing the Iraqis from Kuwait in 100 hours before U.S. officials called a halt.

Schwarzkopf said afterward he agreed with Bush’s decision to stop the war rather than drive to Baghdad to capture Saddam, as his mission had been only to oust the Iraqis from Kuwait.

But in a desert tent meeting with vanquished Iraqi generals, he allowed a key concession on Iraq’s use of helicopters, which later backfired by enabling Saddam to crack down more easily on rebellious Shiites and Kurds.

While he later avoided the public second-guessing by academics and think tank experts over the ambiguous outcome of Gulf War I and its impact on Gulf War II, he told the Washington Post in 2003, “You can’t help but… with 20/20 hindsight, go back and say, ‘Look, had we done something different, we probably wouldn’t be facing what we are facing today.'”

After retiring from the Army in 1992, Schwarzkopf wrote a best-selling autobiography, “It Doesn’t Take A Hero.” Of his Gulf war role, he said, “I like to say I’m not a hero. I was lucky enough to lead a very successful war.” He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and honored with decorations from France, Britain, Belgium, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain.

Schwarzkopf was a national spokesman for prostate cancer awareness and for Recovery of the Grizzly Bear, served on the Nature Conservancy board of governors and was active in various charities for chronically ill children.

“I may have made my reputation as a general in the Army and I’m very proud of that,” he once told the AP. “But I’ve always felt that I was more than one-dimensional. I’d like to think I’m a caring human being. … It’s nice to feel that you have a purpose.”

Schwarzkopf and his wife, Brenda, had three children: Cynthia, Jessica and Christian.

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