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NYT Editorial Board Member Attacks NRA for Having Guns in Its Gun Museum

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H/T The Washington Free Beacon.

The New York Times is a prime example of fake news.

They are lying about gun owners the NRA and John Wayne.

 

The New York Times ran an op-ed Monday attacking the National Rifle Association’s National Firearms Museum and gun owners.

Editorial board member Francis X. Clines wrote in the piece that the Fairfax, Virginia gun museum, which features firearms from every era of American history, represents the worst of America. In particular, Clines was troubled by a display detailing gun use in Hollywood movies.

“There are thousands of ingenious, gleaming rifles and handguns in displays about America’s gun-rich history of colonialism, immigration, expansionism and vigilante justice,” Clines wrote on page A22 of Monday’s Times. “But it is the gallery devoted to Hollywood and its guns and good-guy shooters that best illustrates the power of fantasy now driving the modern gun rights debate.”

Clines expressed outrage at a cardboard cutout of John Wayne displayed in the exhibit, referencing it several times in his editorial. He said the cutout, which depicts a gun-toting Wayne with a grin full of “menace,” promoted fantasies about killing “bad guys” for American gun owners.

“A poster figure of John Wayne, the mega-hero of Hollywood westerns, offers a greeting here at the gun museum’s gallery door as he holds his Winchester carbine at the ready and offers an amiably crooked grin,” Clines said. “The bad guys in the movies never fully understood that the menace behind Wayne’s grin (‘Whoa, take ‘er easy there, Pilgrim’) meant he was about to deliver blazing fantasies of triumphant gunfire that would leave them dead in the dust. It’s no wonder modern Florida legislators could not resist protecting actual shooters who draw and fire like John Wayne as guilt-free, ‘stand-your-ground’ defenders.”

Clines said “the cardboard fantasy of the good guy gunning down the bad guy is what makes the museum work as an enjoyable escape from the life-and-death reality of American gun carnage.”

After complaining that the gun museum displays guns and blanks used in movies, Clines asked why there isn’t a “stream of gripping films about the thousands of troubled Americans with easy access to guns who can lethally act out their darkest grievances on family and society day after day?”

He said the NRA’s support for national gun-carry reciprocity is “rooted in its ultimate fantasy that society will be safer if ordinary Americans are allowed to routinely pack a pistol,” and is part of a “campaign to make gun possession ubiquitous among ordinary citizens.” Currently, concealed carry is legal in every state in the country. There are an estimated 14.5 million gun-carry permit holders and 310 million guns in the United States.

Clines cited a study from a gun-control advocacy group that found about 90 people per year are killed by individuals with concealed-carry permits. However, most of the deaths cited appear to be suicides, accidents, or self-defense-related cases. Clines did not cite any examples of concealed-carry permit holders acting in defense of themselves or others despite recent instances that garnered national news coverage.

The NRA and New York Times have been increasingly at odds, with the publication editorializing against the gun-rights organization and the gun group firing back with ads attacking the paper’s credibility.

 

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Indiana Governor to Sign Several Bills, Including Pro-Gun Legislation

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H/T Bearing Arms.

Governor Eric Holcomb(R-IN) like President Trump is doing what he promised during their respective campaigns for office.

INDIANAPOLIS – (AP) Statehouse employees will be able to carry guns at the Statehouse, people with epilepsy will be able to use marijuana-derived oil as medicine and parents will see a modest increase in abortion notification rights when it comes to their minor children, under measures Gov. Eric Holcomb on Tuesday said he will sign into law.

The Indiana Republican announced his intention to act on some of the more controversial bills this session in a news conference as he took a victory lap for getting many of his priorities approved by the Legislature. Among those are an expansion of the state’s preschool pilot program and a comprehensive infrastructure funding plan.

“In January when I took office, I asked the General Assembly to provide me and the lieutenant governor with the tools necessary to govern aggressively,” Holcomb said. “… In short, the Legislature over delivered.”

He also made his first public comments on his request for a last-minute addition to the budget allowing anonymity for companies supplying lethal injection drugs.

The provision first appeared in a budget draft released early Friday and did not go through a committee process in either chamber. The commissioner of the Department of Corrections said in an earlier statement that some of the drugs necessary to carry out an execution were either expired or approaching their expiration date.

“The state decided long ago that we support the death penalty. And we have to be prepared — I have to be prepared — to administer it,” Holcomb said Tuesday. “As it stands right now, I learned during the session: we are not.”

Lawmakers adjourned early Saturday after signing off on a two-year budget. There are still more than 100 bills Holcomb will need to act on by May 6.

He refused to say Tuesday whether he’ll sign bills limiting which businesses can sell cold beer and eliminating much of the current financial incentive for installing solar panels. He did say he plans to sign bills affirming student religious liberties and allowing a state takeover of Gary and Muncie school districts amid large amounts of debt.

The NRA-backed gun bill Holcomb also said he will sign allows employees of the Senate, House, Legislative Services Agency and Indiana Lobby Registration Commission to be armed in the Statehouse.

Holcomb said those employees often stay late and may have to walk blocks away after work.

“I can sympathize with someone who wants to be able to protect themselves,” he said.

His announcements touched on some of the most contentious issues this session, including the bill allowing substances containing cannabidiol, or CBD, as treatment for some forms of epilepsy.

Some feared it could open the door to legalizing medical marijuana — a notion Holcomb tossed aside Tuesday, saying the bill was about “empathy.”

“This does not put us on a slippery slope to legalizing marijuana,” he said. “Quite the contrary.”

The abortion notification bill also drew some harsh criticisms during the legislative process but was heavily revised over the course of the session.

The measure makes it tougher for a girl under the age of 18 to have an abortion without her parents knowing about it. It requires a judge considering giving a minor permission to have an abortion to also consider whether her parents should receive notification of her pursuit of the so-called “judicial bypass.”

Holcomb said he sees it as a “parental rights issue.”

 

Missouri School of Journalism prof: NRA more dangerous than the Islamic State

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H/T Jihad Watch.

The ignorance of the instructors in our institutions of higher learning is mind blowing.

How asinine is American academia today? It just keeps getting worse. What expanse of territory does the NRA control? How many people has the NRA beheaded and brutalized there? What calls has the NRA issued to its followers and other sympathetic people to murder civilians in the U.S. and other countries? Where are the sex slaves that the NRA has captured from among feminist gun control advocates?

A blinkered Leftist propagandist such as George Kennedy should not be allowed anywhere near a university classroom. Instead, however, the Missouri School of Journalism will probably bring him back and make him head of the department.

MO School of Journalism Prof: NRA More Dangerous Than Islamic State,” by AWR Hawkins, Breitbart, April 20, 2017:

Missouri School of Journalism professor emeritus George Kennedy suggests the National Rifle Association (NRA) is more dangerous than Islamic State.

Writing in the Missourian, Kennedy observed:

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is a terrorist organization founded in 1999, headquartered in Syria and feared around the world. The NRA was founded in 1891, headquartered in Fairfax, Virginia, and is feared by politicians across America.

To be fair, the NRA was actually founded in 1871, but Kennedy continued:

What makes the Islamic State so feared it its willingness to kill in pursuit of its goal of creating a fundamentalist caliphate.

What makes the NRA so feared is its willingness to spend heavily and campaign aggressively in pursuit of its goal of removing all restrictions on the possession and use of firearms just about anywhere by just about anyone.

Notice how Kennedy went from incorrect information–the wrong founding date for the NRA–to unsubstantiated claims that the NRA wants to allow “possession and use of firearms just about anywhere by just about anyone.” In reality, the NRA fights for the enforcement of the law and the prosecution of firearm-wielding criminals with a fervor equaled only by its defense of law-abiding citizens’ right to keep and bear arms. Kennedy’s language muddies the water and misses the point.

Kennedy then claims the number of Americans killed by ISIS jihadists since 9/11 is nine. That is not a typo, he actually links to a Euronews source and claims only nine Americans have been killed by ISIS jihadists since the terror attacks on NYC in 2001.

Where were Kennedy and the Euronews when an attacker claiming allegiance to ISIS attacked Orlando Pulse and killed 49 people on June 12, 2016? That gunman literally used a 911 call to announce his allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. And the Orlando Pulse attack is not the only one that could be mentioned to disprove Kennedy and his Euronews source.

Kennedy’s purpose is claiming “only nine” Americans killed by terrorists was really to set up his second point, that “11,737 Americans” are murdered each year with guns. This figure is actually close to the truth. The average number of firearm-related homicides hovers around 10,500 to 11,500 annually. Many of these homicides occur in gang-riddled cities like Chicago and Baltimore. For example, there were nearly 800 homicides in Chicago in 2016 and over 300 in Baltimore. So a tenth of our nation’s homicides occurred in two Democrat-controlled cities, both of which look to gun control as the solution for the failure of gun control….

Gabby Giffords’ Gun Control Group Urges Opposition to Repeal of Gun Ban for Military Vets

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H/T Breitbarts Big Government.

Little Gabby Giffords like Little Shannon Watts and her band of harpies have had their fifteen minutes of fame and are trying to stay relevant.

They all need to shut up and go away but sadly they won’t go away.

 

Gabby Giffords’ gun control group Americans for Responsible Solutions (ARS) is urging opposition to a repeal of the gun ban for military veterans.

On March 16 Breitbart News reported that the House voted to repeal the gun ban for military veterans and ARS is asking gun controllers to convince their Senators not to follow suit.

ARS posted a link that helps gun controllers write a letter to their Senators. The text of the link says, “Write a letter to your Senators saying that you OPPOSE legislation that would prevent the Department of Veterans Affairs from submitting mental health records to the National Instant Criminal Background Checks System,”

This is nearly identical to the tactics gun controllers used in trying to preserve the Social Security gun ban, which was structured almost identically to the gun ban for military veterans. In both bans, beneficiaries with a mental health moniker whose benefits are sent to a third party for financial management can be stripped of their Second Amendment rights without due process. The key is the mental health label, although such a label is so broad it encompasses everything from severe mental illness–bi-polar disease and schizophrenia–to moderate, treatable issues that may only be temporary. These latter mental health conditions could be anxiety or depression.

Under such a framework, an 85-year-old Social Security beneficiary who needed help with finances and was suffering from depression over the recent death of a spouse would be in danger of losing his or her gun rights based on a Social Security Administration judgement. The House recognized this and voted to repeal the Social Security gun ban on February 2 and the Senate voted for repeal on February 15. President Trump signed the repeal on February 28.

The focus is now on repealing the gun ban for military vets; another ban that can put veterans with moderate, treatable mental health issues at risk of losing their Second Amendment rights.

Gabby Giffords’ gun control group is fighting the repeal, and Gabby Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly have launched smaller, satellite gun control groups which are opposing the repeal as well.

Our veterans deserve better, and the NRA-ILA’s Chris Cox  explained exactly why the gun ban needs to be repealed: “Receiving assistance to handle personal finances does not mean an individual is unable to safely own a firearm. Our brave men and women in the military should not be stripped of their constitutional rights without due process of law.”

Iowa lawmakers pass the state’s most expansive gun rights bill ever

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H/T The Washington Post.

Bravo Iowa for becoming very gun owner friendly.

I would like to see my home state of Indiana follow Iowa’s lead.

With one stroke of a pen, Gov. Terry Branstad is poised to make Iowa one of the friendliest states for gun owners.

Lawmakers have passed a bill that many say is the most comprehensive and broadest piece of legislation on gun rights the state has seen. The legislation would, among other things, allow citizens to use deadly force if they believe their lives are threatened and to sue local government officials if they think gun-free zones have violated their Second Amendment rights.

Branstad, the long-serving Republican governor whom President Trump selected to be the ambassador to China, has hinted that he’s inclined to sign the bill, calling it “reasonable” legislation that he “could support.” House File 517 reached the governor’s desk this week.

The passage of House File 517 marks the end of a decades-long battle for a bill that does more than make incremental changes to the state’s gun laws and would bring Iowa in line with its more gun-friendly neighbors such as Missouri and Wisconsin, said Barry Snell, president of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, an advocacy group that has been instrumental in the bill’s inception and passage.

“Without exaggeration, House File 517 is the most monumental and sweeping piece of gun legislation in Iowa’s history,” Snell told The Washington Post. “Never before have we passed a bill in which Iowa’s Second Amendment rights are legally recognized, claimed and protected quite so profoundly as this bill does.”

Among the bill’s more controversial parts is a “Stand Your Ground” provision that says citizens who are not doing anything illegal can lawfully use “reasonable force, including deadly force” if they believe their lives are being threatened. The bill also frees a person who kills an “aggressor” from civil liability if he or she can justify the use of force.

That provision has raised concerns that the bill would do more to increase gun violence in the state.

State Sen. Nate Boulton (D) said state law already allows Iowans to use deadly force if they are threatened in their homes or places of employment, adding that a Stand Your Ground law could lead some to misunderstand when deadly force may be used.

I think anytime we are expanding the use of deadly force, we do have to be cautious about that,” Boulton said. “The reality is when you have a gun-violent situation and if someone is killed with gun violence, we’ll leave it to our courts to interpret and apply what the situation was that led to that death.”

Daniel Webster, director of the John Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, echoed Boulton in a column published last month in the Des Moines Register. The “Stand Your Ground” policy would only “expand justifications for killing others,” he wrote.

There is no credible research that indicates deregulation of public carrying of concealed firearms reduces violent crime or curtails mass shootings,” Webster wrote. “The most recent and most rigorous research shows that such policies, if anything, lead to more assaults committed with firearms.”

Another provision that has attracted criticism would essentially prohibit city, county and township officials from creating weapons-free zones by allowing gun-carrying citizens to file lawsuits and claim damages if they think their civil rights have been infringed upon. Critics have raised concerns about how the bill would affect security at places such as city halls and courthouses, many of which are gun-free zones.

Tom Ferguson, executive director of the Iowa County Attorneys Association, said because the bill does not exempt city halls or courthouses, local jurisdictions would face a constant threat of lawsuits and damages.

“The question becomes, ‘Is someone adversely affected if they want to go in there and are not allowed to carry a gun?’ ” Ferguson said.

The Iowa Judicial Branch, which oversees state courts, shares similar concerns. Spokesman Steve Davis said the judicial branch is unsure that the bill “will maintain the status quo on courthouse security.”

The criticisms, however, did little to dissuade the bill’s avid backers.

HF 517 passed the state Senate 33 to 17 and the House, 57 to 36.

State Rep. Matt Windschitl (R), who led the drafting of the bill, said he has tried for years to make Iowa a Stand Your Ground state, like nearly half of the states in the country.

“This bill has been a work in progress for many years,” Windschitl said. “The driver behind this is to restore Iowans’ individual freedoms and liberties.”

Other provisions include allowing children under 14 to use pistols or revolvers as long as they are supervised by an adult age 21 and older, legalizing concealed-carry at state capitol buildings and grounds, prohibiting the government from confiscating firearms during state emergencies, legalizing short-barreled rifles and shotguns, and making records of permit holders confidential. The bill also would prohibit prosecutors from stacking an additional firearm charge if the weapon has nothing to do with the crime.

Robert Cottrol, an expert on gun laws and a professor at George Washington University, said many of the provisions have been standard practice in most states.

Aside from the Stand Your Ground law, most states with significant rural areas already allow children to possess firearms, Cottrol said. Many states also have enacted laws prohibiting the government from seizing people’s guns during state emergencies, after officials confiscated weapons during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

This is the first time in years that Republicans gained control of both the House and the Senate in Iowa, and gun rights advocates found an opportunity to catch up with its gun-friendly neighbors by addressing gun-rights issues in one fell swoop, said Snell of the Iowa Firearms Coalition, which is affiliated with the National Rifle Association.

It’s not uncommon for states to pass gun-law revisions in one bill, according to the NRA, a supporter of the bill. Alabama, Georgia, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Wisconsin have done so in recent years.

“This important legislation will make it easier for law-abiding gun owners to protect and defend themselves, while bringing Iowa’s gun law in line with those of other states,” NRA spokeswoman Jennifer Baker said in a statement. “The reforms of HF 517 are part of a growing movement across all 50 states to strengthen Second Amendment rights and its enactment will be a significant victory for our members and law-abiding gun owners.”

The magazine Guns & Ammo ranks Iowa No. 38 among the best states for gun owners. At the top of the list are Arizona, Vermont, Alaska, Utah, Kentucky, Wyoming, Alabama, Kansas, Missouri and New Hampshire.

That could change if the bill becomes law.

The legislation might make Iowa “the leading edge of protecting the civil right” to bear arms, said Randy Barnett, a law professor at Georgetown University.

“When you have a constitutional right, it often requires the legislation to protect that right,” Barnett said. “That’s what Iowa is doing.”

Man Accidentally Shoots Himself at NRA Headquarters: Police

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H/T NBC News 4 Washington. 

It seems not even NRA employees are free from negligent discharges of their firearms.

The employee suffered a minor wound to his lower body and was taken to a hospital for treatment, according to Fairfax county police.

A National Rifle Association employee accidentally shot himself while doing firearms training at the organization’s headquarters, according to police.

The 46-year-old man’s pistol accidentally discharged Thursday afternoon as he holstered the gun in Fairfax County, Virginia, police said.

The accidental shooting happened at the NRA’s National Firearms Museum at 11250 Waples Mill Road in Fairfax.

The employee suffered a minor wound to his lower body and was taken to a hospital for treatment, police said.

Officers worked with the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office and no charges are expected, according to police.

News4 has reached out to the NRA for comment, but has not received an immediate response.

Source: Man Accidentally Shoots Himself at NRA Headquarters: Police | NBC4 Washington http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Man-Accidentally-Shoots-Himself-at-NRA-Headquarters-418677433.html?_osource=SocialFlowTwt_DCBrand&cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma#ixzz4e49r4GjE
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Seattle Gun Tax Fails to Generate Projected Revenue, Succeeds in Burdening Rights

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H/T The NRA-ILA.

I have never seen any liberal scam to raise revenue ever work be it a gun tax, cigarette tax etc.

On March 16, 2017, the Seattle Times reported that Seattle city officials were reluctant to release data on the revenue generated by the city’s firearms and ammunition tax, citing taxpayer confidentiality concerns. Less than a week later, we now know the more likely reason that Seattle failed to disclose this tax revenue; because the money raised fell woefully short of the figure projected by supporters of the tax.

In July 2015, Seattle City Council President Tim Burgess proposed legislation he dubbed a “Gun Violence Tax,” contending that “It’s time for the gun industry to help defray” the cost of criminal violence perpetrated with guns. Burgess’s proposal was unanimously passed by the city council on August 10, 2015. The legislation imposed a $25 tax on firearm sales, a $.02 per round tax on .22 and smaller caliber ammunition, and a $.05 per round tax on ammunition greater than .22 caliber. The revenue was intended to be used to fund anti-gun research at the Harborview Medical Center.

  On August 24, 2015, NRA, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, and the Second Amendment Foundation filed suit in King County Superior Court to prevent the city from enforcing the new tax. NRA’s complaint pointed out that the tax violates the Second Amendment and is also impermissible under Washington law.

The U.S. Supreme Court has made clear that governments are not permitted to attack constitutionally-protected conduct through taxation. In the First Amendment context, the Court struck down a Minnesota use tax on ink and paper used in publishing. In that case – Minneapolis Star Tribune Co. v. Minnesota Commissioner of Revenue – the Court warned that “A power to tax differentially, as opposed to a power to tax generally, gives a government a powerful weapon against the taxpayer selected.”

Washington’s firearms preemption statute also bars Seattle’s tax. Section 9.41.290 of the Revised Code of Washington states,

The state of Washington hereby fully occupies and preempts the entire field of firearms regulation within the boundaries of the state, including the registration, licensing, possession, purchase, sale, acquisition, transfer, discharge, and transportation of firearms, or any other element relating to firearms or parts thereof, including ammunition and reloader components.

and,

Local laws and ordinances that are inconsistent with, more restrictive than, or exceed the requirements of state law shall not be enacted and are preempted and repealed, regardless of the nature of the code, charter, or home rule status of such city, town, county, or municipality.

Washington law does provide a small number of specific exemptions to the state firearm preemption statute, but these concern local zoning in relating to firearms dealers, carry in certain municipal buildings, and the discharge of firearms.

Despite the plain language of Washington’s preemption statute, in December 2015 King County Superior Court Judge Palmer Robinson upheld Seattle’s tax. NRA and our allies have appealed the court’s decision, and the case now sits with the Washington State Supreme Court.

In advocating for the tax, Burgess and other supporters of the legislation repeatedly cited figures from the City Budget Office that claimed the tax would raise between $300,000 and $500,000 a year. In an email to the Times this week, Burgess confessed, “During its first year, the firearms and ammunition tax payments received by the City were less than $200,000.” It is not clear how much less than $200,000 the city collected.

According to the Times, to come up with the outlandish $300,000-$500,000 figure, the City Budget Office “obtained the annual number of background checks for gun sales in Washington. Then they looked up what percentage of Washington’s licensed gun dealers were in Seattle and used that to guess the number of firearms sales in the city.” In addition to the fact that its analysis was too rudimentary to offer an accurate estimate of gun sales in Seattle, the budget office appears to have made no attempt to predict the impact the significant tax would have on the behavior of gun dealers and buyers.

Making this projection appear even more ridiculous is that the 2016 tax shortfall occurred in a year that witnessed record gun sales nationally and in the Evergreen State. In 2016, there were 713,996 NICS background checks conducted in Washington, whereas the 2015 total was 502,280. Washingtonians were buying plenty of guns in 2016, but as many predicted when the tax was proposed, not in Seattle.

The inaccuracy of City Budget Office’s projections was readily apparent to gun dealers at the time the tax was enacted. Shortly after Burgess proposed the tax, Seattle gun store owner Sergey Solyanik told the Times that he didn’t think the city’s projected revenue was realistic. Solyanik explained that should the tax pass, “I would have almost no margins, so I would pass the tax on to my customers and most people would simply not buy from me… They would go to any of the stores around Seattle — there are a large number — and I would have to close.” Another gun dealer told the Times, “The public won’t buy ammunition in Seattle anymore… When a $10 or $15 box of ammunition costs an extra five bucks, it won’t be worth it.”

In addition to speaking to the press, Solyanik took his concerns about the tax and the foolish revenue projection directly to the city council. On July 15, 2015, Solyanik told the council, “I was horrified when I see the numbers behind this proposal. Seattle is a city that has a vibrant engineering community. We would think that we would be making decisions such as this based on data. And the data that has been submitted by the proponents is completely fake.” Speaking to the council again on the day that it passed the tax, Solyanik warned, “the revenue numbers in this proposal are not real. The city is not going to get any money from this tax. The city instead will lose tax revenue on existing sales.” Solyanik went on to add, “The only real purpose of this legislation is to run gun stores out of the city. I know it, you know it, and the courts will know it.”

In that effort, the city succeeded. Solyanik moved his store outside the city to avoid the tax. According to the Times, the only other dedicated gun store in Seattle has also left. Any honest accounting of the revenue collected from the tax should account for the lost revenue from these stores, and the others whose business has been curtailed by Seattle’s restriction.

Seattle’s high-profile failure has put every other anti-gun locality on notice that this type of taxation scheme is ineffective for raising revenue. Seattle’s embarrassment should make it harder for other localities to hide behind the false claim that these sorts of tax regimes are intended to raise revenue, rather than burden Second Amendment rights.

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