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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 76th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

 

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 75th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

Pearl Harbor survivor Anthony ‘Tony’ Gannarelli dies at 102

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This is from The Dallas Morning News.

We have lost another member of The Greatest Generation.

R. I. P. Anthony ‘Tony’ Gannarelli.

Anthony Gannarelli, left, sits with his wife Kathryn at the American Legion Post 321.

Anthony “Tony” Gannarelli didn’t know much when he joined the Navy in 1934, but he learned plenty the day he looked out from his bed in the sick ward to see a Japanese fighter buzzing over a hangar at Pearl Harbor.

“I didn’t know anything. I didn’t even know how those big ships even floated,” Gannarelli told The Dallas Morning News in 2012. “But I learned all I could.”

The 28-year-old Navy turret gunner quickly assessed the situation in 1941.

“Boy, we got troubles,” the longtime Plano resident recalled thinking.

Gannarelli died Wednesday in Port Royal, where he moved to be closer to his daughter. He was just five days shy of his 103rd birthday.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Sunday at Turrentine-Jackson-Morrow Funeral Home in Allen. Gannarelli will be laid to rest with military honors at Ridgeview Memorial Park in Allen.

Visitation will be from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home.

Gannarelli was born in Huntingdon, Penn., in 1913 and joined the Navy at age 21 because there were “just no jobs” and he saw Uncle Sam staring at him everywhere he went.

During World War II and afterward, Gannarelli swiftly moved up the ranks and was awarded several medals and ribbons. He was honored in 2014 at a ceremony for the Frisco Veterans Memorial in Frisco Commons Park.

Gannarelli was a devoted Catholic and a family man who enjoyed woodworking and fixing things, having worked in Sears’ automotive department for 19 years.

His military career spanned 25 years, and he eventually retired in Plano with his wife of 69 years, Kathryn Gannarelli, where they lived until she passed in 2014.

“He talked to everybody in Plano,” his daughter Dana Schuld said. “He was tenderhearted and he never met a stranger.”

Many teachers, including his granddaughter, incorporated Gannarelli into their history lessons, inviting him to talk to students about his Pearl Harbor experiences.

“He loved talking to kids,” Schuld said. “Up until the very end, he could tell you the name of the commanders on the ship. He was alert and with it.”

Gannarelli is survived by his daughter and her husband, Norman, of Sheldon, S.C.; grandson Daniel S. Poncik; granddaughter Morgan K. LeFevre and her husband, Justin; and great-granddaughter Anabella M. LeFevre.

Just last week, Gannarelli was presented with a quilt honoring his military service, along with a framed military map and sand from the Japanese island of Iwo Jima.

Schuld was preparing to hang the memorabilia at her father’s home when his health took a turn for the worse. Now, it will serve as a reminder of him and his war stories.

“He was an all-around type of guy,” Schuld said. “I was always so proud of him. He was a great father and was always there for us.”

Remembering Pearl Harbor

4 Comments

 

th

December 7,1941, is a date that will live in infamy.”

As we note the 74th anniversary of the bombing, how many people still think about Pearl Harbor?

Not many I know. I have heard the comment that it was so long ago.

I will always remember Pearl Harbor, and our daughter’s will be taught about Pearl Harbor.

They will be taught to honor the memory of the people who lost their lives there and in the war.

Both the Pearl Harbor attack and the attacks on the World Trade Center have been forgotten.

Both attacks were made by fanatical cowards.

Just as then, we are now in a fight for freedom.

Like then, the fanatics must be wiped out by whatever means are necessary.

Let’s take a look back at the attack at Pearl Harbor.

The Japanese aircraft carriers were approximately 270 miles north of the coast of Oahu.

There were two waves of attacking aircraft of 350 planes, starting at 7:53 a.m. and ending at 9:55 a.m., Honolulu time. By 1 p.m. the Japanese aircraft carriers were on their way back to Japan.

The Japanese lost approximately 65 airplanes, five midget submarines, and one large submarine.

For The United States the losses were as follows:

188 airplanes destroyed.

Eight battleships were badly damaged or destroyed, including the USS Arizona.

There were a total of 2,403 military and civilian deaths.

When the USS Arizona sank, it killed 1,170 crew members, including 37 sets of brothers.

We must always remember Pearl Harbor and honor everyone who served in World War II.

We must also honor all of those who paid the ultimate price for our freedom.

My Uncle P.F.C. Frank Walters was one of the many Americans that died for our freedom

Our daughters will know about Pearl Harbor and honoring our veterans.

The U.S.S.Arizona still sheds oil stained tears for her lost crew members and the dead of December 7,1941

November 22,1963 The End Of Camelot

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If you are old enough, you can recall this terrible day.

You can recall where you were, and what you were doing when you heard the news.
Like the greatest generation and Pearl Harbor, the memory is vivid in our minds.
I was nine years old at the time. I recall the teacher turning on the television to warm up. ( Yes, TVs then had tubes so they needed to warm up.)
Instead of our usual science program, there was a newscaster saying President Kennedy had been shot in Dallas, Texas. We were stunned and started to cry.
Then the announcement came that we were going home early.
The bus ride home was quiet except for our sobs.

When I got home my mother had the television on and we heard that President Kennedy had died. That added to the sorrow of that horrible day.

My younger brother was about five years old at that time.
He was a real fan of President Kennedy.
Whenever he heard the President’s voice, he would run into the room to listen.
He was really heart-broken.
Over the next few days we watched the events unfold in Dallas.
A suspect was named and then arrested. It was Lee Harvey Oswald.
Then we saw Jack Ruby murder Oswald on television.
President Kennedy’s funeral was broadcast along with John-John‘s salute to his fallen father.
Like the Twin Towers being brought down, this event is forever in my memory.

Remains of seven servicemen killed at Pearl Harbor identified

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This is from Fox News. 

R.I.P. Valiant Warriors Hand Salute. 

In this photo taken July 27, 2015, in Honolulu, military pallbearers salute over the exhumed remains of unidentified crew members of the USS Oklahoma killed in the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor. The military says it has identified the remains of seven crew members missing since the Oklahoma capsized in the bombing. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Photo/Marco Garcia)

The remains of seven crew members missing since the USS Oklahoma capsized in the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor have been identified, the military said Monday.

The names of the servicemen identified using dental records will be released after their families have been notified.

In June, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency began digging up the remains of nearly 400 USS Oklahoma sailors and Marines from a veterans cemetery in Honolulu where they were buried as “unknowns.”

Within five years, officials expect to identify about 80 percent of the Oklahoma crew members still considered missing.

The military says it started the project because advances in forensic science and technology are improving the ability to identify remains.

 On Monday, officials exhumed the last four of 61 caskets containing unknown people from the Oklahoma. Many of the caskets include the remains of multiple individuals.

Families will have the option of receiving remains as they are identified, or waiting until the agency has more pieces of a body or even a complete skeleton. Navy casualty officers will let families know their options.

Altogether, 429 men on board the World War II battleship were killed. Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.

Identification work will be conducted at agency laboratories in Hawaii and Nebraska. DNA analysis will be conducted at the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

More than 2,400 sailors, Marines and soldiers were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Oklahoma’s casualties were second only to the USS Arizona, which lost 1,177 men.

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