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Coke Lore: The History of the Modern Day Santa Claus

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This is from Coca-Cola.com.

Coke Lore - Santa Claus

5 Things You Never Knew About Santa Claus and Coca-Cola

The Santa Claus we all know and love — that big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard — didn’t always look that way. In fact, many people are surprised to learn that prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop’s robe and a Norse huntsman’s animal skin.

In fact, when Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper’s Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.

Here, a few other things you may not have realized about the cheerful guy in the red suit.

1. Santa Has Been Featured in Coke Ads Since the 1920s

The Coca-Cola Company began its Christmas advertising in the 1920s with shopping-related ads in magazines like The Saturday Evening Post. The first Santa ads used a strict-looking Claus, in the vein of Thomas Nast.

In 1930, artist Fred Mizen painted a department-store Santa in a crowd drinking a bottle of Coke. The ad featured the world’s largest soda fountain, which was located in the department store Famous Barr Co. in St. Louis, Mo. Mizen’s painting was used in print ads that Christmas season, appearing in The Saturday Evening Post in December 1930.

2. Coca-Cola Helped Shape the Image of Santa

In 1931 the company began placing Coca-Cola ads in popular magazines. Archie Lee, the D’Arcy Advertising Agency executive working with The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the campaign to show a wholesome Santa who was both realistic and symbolic. So Coca-Colacommissioned Michigan-born illustrator Haddon Sundblom to develop advertising images using Santa Claus — showing Santa himself, not a man dressed as Santa.

For inspiration, Sundblom turned to Clement Clark Moore‘s 1822 poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” (commonly called “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”). Moore’s description of St. Nick led to an image of a warm, friendly, pleasantly plump and human Santa. (And even though it’s often said that Santa wears a red coat because red is the color of Coca-Cola, Santa appeared in a red coat before Sundblom painted him.)

Sundblom’s Santa debuted in 1931 in Coke ads in The Saturday Evening Post and appeared regularly in that magazine, as well as in Ladies Home JournalNational GeographicThe New Yorker and others.

From 1931 to 1964, Coca-Cola advertising showed Santa delivering toys (and playing with them!), pausing to read a letter and enjoy a Coke, visiting with the children who stayed up to greet him, and raiding the refrigerators at a number of homes. The original oil paintings Sundblom created were adapted for Coca-Cola advertising in magazines and on store displays, billboards, posters, calendars and plush dolls. Many of those items today are popularcollectibles.

Sundblom created his final version of Santa Claus in 1964, but for several decades to follow,Coca-Cola advertising featured images of Santa based on Sundblom’s original works. These paintings are some of the most prized pieces in the art collection in the company’s archives department and have been on exhibit around the world, in famous locales including the Louvrein Paris, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, the Isetan Department Store in Tokyo, and the NK Department Store in Stockholm. Many of the original paintings can be seen on display at World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Ga.

3. The “New Santa” Was Based on a Salesman

In the beginning, Sundblom painted the image of Santa using a live model — his friend Lou Prentiss, a retired salesman. When Prentiss passed away, Sundblom used himself as a model, painting while looking into a mirror. Finally, he began relying on photographs to create the image of St. Nick.

People loved the Coca-Cola Santa images and paid such close attention to them that when anything changed, they sent letters to The Coca-Cola Company. One year, Santa’s large belt was backwards (perhaps because Sundblom was painting via a mirror). Another year, Santa Claus appeared without a wedding ring, causing fans to write asking what happened to Mrs. Claus.

The children who appear with Santa in Sundblom’s paintings were based on Sundblom’s neighbors — two little girls. So he changed one to a boy in his paintings.

The dog in Sundblom’s 1964 Santa Claus painting was actually a gray poodle belonging to the neighborhood florist. But Sundblom wanted the dog to stand out in the holiday scene, so he painted the animal with black fur.

4. Santa Claus Got a New Friend in 1942

In 1942, Coca-Cola introduced “Sprite Boy,” a character who appeared with Santa Claus inCoca-Cola advertising throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Sprite Boy, who was also created by Sundblom, got his name due to the fact that he was a sprite, or an elf. (It wasn’t until the 1960s that Coca-Cola introduced the popular beverage Sprite.)

5. Santa Became Animated in 2001

In 2001, the artwork from Sundblom’s 1962 painting was the basis for an animated TV commercial starring the Coca-Cola Santa. The ad was created by Academy Award-winning animator Alexandre Petrov.

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Hank Snow – God Is My Santa Claus

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In a class room at the grade school just before the Hollidays
Boys and girls were writing notes to Santa far away
Expect a lad who sat alone his paper put away
And when his teacher asked him why so softly he did say
Oh God is my Santa Claus each and every day
I don’t write him letters ma’m I just kneel and pray
Don’t you know his greatest gift salvation is afound
God is my Santa Claus each day the whole you’re round.
Then the teacher stood in silence after what the child had said
He really knew real Christmas day and not from books he’d read
He truly met real Santa Clause he said him just one word
God gave his praise for Christmas day my Santa Clause is God
(God is my Santa Claus each and every day
I don’t write him letters ma’m I just kneel and pray)
Do you know his greatest gift salvation is afonud
God to be my Santa Claus each day the whole you’re round

 

Santa Claus

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This is from The World of Christmas.net.

Here are some of the names of Santa Claus or Father Christmas.

Santa Claus is one of the most famous characters that is loved by children all over the world. He is known for giving gifts to good kids on Christmas Eve. He is also known as Saint Nicholas, Saint Nick, Father Christmas, Kriss Kringle, Santy or simply Santa. In many countries, kids, especially ‘in spirit’, believe Father Christmas as being real. Other names by which Father Christmas is known in other countries are:
  • Afghanistan – Baba Chaghaloo
  • Armenia – Gaghant Baba
  • Brazil – Papai Noel
  • Czech Republic – Ježíšek
  • Denmark – Julemanden
  • France and French Canada – Le Père Noël
  • Germany – Weihnachtsmann
  • Iraq and South Africa – Goosaleh
  • Ireland & Scottish Highlands – Daidí na Nollag
  • Italy – Babbo Natale
  • Portugal – Pai Natal
  • Romania – Mos Craciun
  • Spain and Mexico – Papá Noel
  • Netherlands and Belgium – Sinterklaas
Saint Nicholas or Kriss Kringle was a historical figure, believed to be the kind bishop of Turkey. He used to give presents to the needy, poor and good kids, just to make them smile. Thus, he became the subject of many folktales and mythical fantasies. With time, his image changes to the modern version of Santa Claus with a long white beard, red robes and red bonnet with white trimmings, a big round belly and a kindly cheerful smile on his face and sparkling eyes.He is believed to live at North Pole or Lapland in Finland along with his team of elves, reindeers and his wife, Mrs. Claus. Together, they keep a record of all good children all over the world and give them the requested presents near Christmas time. They make toys, cookies and even make miracles happen for them. With time, Santa became so popular that today he is used as a promotional tool for many shopping malls and stores during Christmas time to lure kids and their families. Santa loves children who are kind and obedient to their elders.

Coke Lore: The History of the Modern Day Santa Claus

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This is from Coca-Cola.com.

I wanted to lighten things up a bit.

We need a pleasant change of pace.

Coke Lore - Santa Claus

5 Things You Never Knew About Santa Claus and Coca-Cola

The Santa Claus we all know and love — that big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard — didn’t always look that way. In fact, many people are surprised to learn that prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop’s robe and a Norse huntsman’s animal skin.

In fact, when Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper’s Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.

Here, a few other things you may not have realized about the cheerful guy in the red suit.

1. Santa Has Been Featured in Coke Ads Since the 1920s

The Coca-Cola Company began its Christmas advertising in the 1920s with shopping-related ads in magazines like The Saturday Evening Post. The first Santa ads used a strict-looking Claus, in the vein of Thomas Nast.

In 1930, artist Fred Mizen painted a department-store Santa in a crowd drinking a bottle of Coke. The ad featured the world’s largest soda fountain, which was located in the department store Famous Barr Co. in St. Louis, Mo. Mizen’s painting was used in print ads that Christmas season, appearing in The Saturday Evening Post in December 1930.

2. Coca-Cola Helped Shape the Image of Santa

In 1931 the company began placing Coca-Cola ads in popular magazines. Archie Lee, the D’Arcy Advertising Agency executive working with The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the campaign to show a wholesome Santa who was both realistic and symbolic. So Coca-Colacommissioned Michigan-born illustrator Haddon Sundblom to develop advertising images using Santa Claus — showing Santa himself, not a man dressed as Santa.

For inspiration, Sundblom turned to Clement Clark Moore‘s 1822 poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” (commonly called “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”). Moore’s description of St. Nick led to an image of a warm, friendly, pleasantly plump and human Santa. (And even though it’s often said that Santa wears a red coat because red is the color of Coca-Cola, Santa appeared in a red coat before Sundblom painted him.)

Sundblom’s Santa debuted in 1931 in Coke ads in The Saturday Evening Post and appeared regularly in that magazine, as well as in Ladies Home JournalNational GeographicThe New Yorker and others.

From 1931 to 1964, Coca-Cola advertising showed Santa delivering toys (and playing with them!), pausing to read a letter and enjoy a Coke, visiting with the children who stayed up to greet him, and raiding the refrigerators at a number of homes. The original oil paintings Sundblom created were adapted for Coca-Cola advertising in magazines and on store displays, billboards, posters, calendars and plush dolls. Many of those items today are popularcollectibles.

Sundblom created his final version of Santa Claus in 1964, but for several decades to follow,Coca-Cola advertising featured images of Santa based on Sundblom’s original works. These paintings are some of the most prized pieces in the art collection in the company’s archives department and have been on exhibit around the world, in famous locales including the Louvrein Paris, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, the Isetan Department Store in Tokyo, and the NK Department Store in Stockholm. Many of the original paintings can be seen on display at World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Ga.

3. The “New Santa” Was Based on a Salesman

In the beginning, Sundblom painted the image of Santa using a live model — his friend Lou Prentiss, a retired salesman. When Prentiss passed away, Sundblom used himself as a model, painting while looking into a mirror. Finally, he began relying on photographs to create the image of St. Nick.

People loved the Coca-Cola Santa images and paid such close attention to them that when anything changed, they sent letters to The Coca-Cola Company. One year, Santa’s large belt was backwards (perhaps because Sundblom was painting via a mirror). Another year, Santa Claus appeared without a wedding ring, causing fans to write asking what happened to Mrs. Claus.

The children who appear with Santa in Sundblom’s paintings were based on Sundblom’s neighbors — two little girls. So he changed one to a boy in his paintings.

The dog in Sundblom’s 1964 Santa Claus painting was actually a gray poodle belonging to the neighborhood florist. But Sundblom wanted the dog to stand out in the holiday scene, so he painted the animal with black fur.

4. Santa Claus Got a New Friend in 1942

In 1942, Coca-Cola introduced “Sprite Boy,” a character who appeared with Santa Claus inCoca-Cola advertising throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Sprite Boy, who was also created by Sundblom, got his name due to the fact that he was a sprite, or an elf. (It wasn’t until the 1960s that Coca-Cola introduced the popular beverage Sprite.)

5. Santa Became Animated in 2001

In 2001, the artwork from Sundblom’s 1962 painting was the basis for an animated TV commercial starring the Coca-Cola Santa. The ad was created by Academy Award-winning animator Alexandre Petrov.

Santa Claus: An Engineer’s Perspective

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My brother-in-law sent me this in a email.

 

Santa Claus: An Engineer’s Perspective

There are approximately two billion children (persons under 18) in the
world. However, since Santa does not visit children of Muslim, Hindu,
Jewish or Buddhist (except maybe in Japan) religions, this reduces the
workload for Christmas night to 15% of the total, or 378 million
(according to the population reference bureau).

At an average (census0rate of 3.5 children per household, that comes to 108 million homes,
presuming that there is at least one good child in each.

Different time zones and the rotation of the earth, assuming he travels east to
west (which seems logical), this works out to 967.7 visits per second.

This is to say that for each Christian household with a good child,
Santa has around 1/1000th of a second to park the sleigh, hop out,
jump down the chimney, fill the stockings, distribute the remaining
presents under the tree, eat whatever snacks have been left for him,
get back up the chimney, jump into the sleigh and get on to the next
house.

Assuming that each of these 108 million stops is evenly distributed
around the earth (which, of course, we know to be false, but will
accept for the purposes of our calculations), we are now talking about
0.78 miles per household; a total trip of 75.5 million miles, not
counting bathroom stops or breaks.

This means Santa’s sleigh is moving at 650 miles per second, 3,000 times the speed of sound.

For purposes of comparison, the fastest manmade vehicle, the Ulysses space probe,
moves at a poky 27.4 miles per second, and a conventional reindeer can
run (at best) 15 miles per hour.

The payload of the sleigh adds another interesting element. Assuming
that each child gets nothing more than a medium sized Lego set (two
pounds), the sleigh is carrying over 500 thousand tons, not counting
Santa himself.

On land, a conventional reindeer can pull no more than
300 pounds. Even granting that the “flying” reindeer could pull ten
times the normal amount, the job can’t be done with eight or even nine
of them. Santa would need 360,000 of them.

This increases the payload,not counting the weight of the sleigh, another 54,000 tons, or roughly
seven times the weight of the Queen Elizabeth (the ship, not the monarch).

600,000 tons traveling at 650 miles per second creates enormous air resistance.

This would heat up the reindeer in the same fashion as a
spacecraft reentering the earth’s atmosphere.

The lead pair of reindeer would absorb 14.3 quintillion joules of energy per second
each.

In short, they would burst into flames almost instantaneously,exposing the reindeer behind them

and creating deafening sonic booms in their wake.

The entire reindeer team would be vaporized within 4.26 thousandths of a second, or right about

the time Santa reached the fifth house on his trip.

Not that it matters, however, since Santa, as a result of accelerating from a dead stop to 650 m.p.s.

in .001 seconds, would be subjected to acceleration forces of 17,500 g’s.

A 250 pound Santa (which seems ludicrously slim) would be pinned to the

back of the sleigh by 4,315,015 pounds of force, instantly crushing

his bones and organs and reducing him to a quivering blob of pink goo.

Therefore, even if Santa did exist, he’s dead now.

Merry Christmas.

 

Arizona Gun Club Invites Families to Pose With Santa and a Machine Gun

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The article below is from FOX News.
I think this is a great idea.
How long before Sarah Brady and her sheeple sound off?
112611gunsanta.jpg

An Arizona gun club is putting a new twist on Christmas by inviting families to pose for a photo with Santa Claus and a gun.
The Scottsdale Gun Club is hosting what they call a family event that allows people to take a holiday card picture with St. Nick, and a high-powered firearm.
Santa poses against a backdrop of an $80,000 Garwood mini-gun, and families can choose to pose with other firearms. Choices range from pistols to modified AR15s.
They also get a chance to test out the machine guns.
“I thinks it’s going to be all in fun from those who support the second amendment and those who don’t. Whether you’re a gun advocate or not, you should have a lot of fun with it,” said gun club member Richard Jones.



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/11/27/arizona-gun-club-invites-families-to-pose-with-santa-and-machine-gun/?test=latestnews#ixzz1eyZwXwIR

 

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