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Political Elite with Concealed Carry Permits a Symptom of “Only Ones’ NOT Support for Gun Rights

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This is from AmmoLand.com.

Oh the hypocrisy of the Loony left.

They want to be armed but they want us unarmed.

Colorado ––(Ammoland.com)-

Even one of America’s premier political news sites, Politico.com, has picked up the story about how National Association for Gun Rights members just like you toppled Tim Pawlenty’s Presidential campaign.

The article even noted my subsequent call for NAGR members to lobby Governor Rick Perry to return the National Association for Gun Rights Presidential Candidate Survey.

However, Politco.com writer Maggie Haberman missed the mark when she noted that Perry has a concealed carry permit by assuming he must be pro-gun because he has a concealed weapon permit.

Senator Barbara Boxer

Senator Barbara Boxer, seen here vilifying semi-automatic rifles with Dianne Feinstein, has a permit to carry.

The Washington, D.C. elites just don’t get it. They think that simply having a concealed weapon permit automatically makes any politician pro-gun.

Do you think California Democrat Senator Barbara Boxer is pro-gun? No, I don’t think so, either.

But Barbara Boxer used her influence to secure an elusive concealed carry permit from California.

I can almost hear her trying to deceive gun owners… “Trust me, I have a permit.”

Or how about New York Democrat Senator Chuck Schumer?

Schumer himself is reported to possess a New York concealed handgun permit, and both U.S. Senators regularly employed armed guards for their personal protection.

Just because a politician recognizes that being armed makes THEM safer, doesn’t mean they support YOUR right to keep and bear arms. They think they’re different than you and me, that because of their title they’re entitled to MORE rights than we are.

The Second Amendment is about much more than just carrying concealed… or hunting… or sport shooting.

Your right to keep and bear arms is a bulwark against tyranny.

Chuck Schumer

Chuck Schumer, one of the most anti-gun Senators in Washington D.C., obtained a permit to carry for self-defense.

That’s why the National Association for Gun Rights sends Presidential Candidate Surveys to politicians like Tim Pawlenty and Governor Rick Perry.

Gun owners MUST know where they stand on important issues like banning magazine or bans on certain types of semi-automatic rifles, or opposing the United Nations’ Small Arms Treaty gun-grab.

Please call Rick Perry’s campaign RIGHT NOW at (858) 483-4300 and demand that he return the National Association for Gun Rights Presidential Candidate Survey.

I hope you’ll also take a moment and re-read my article about how AmmoLand readers like you toppled Tim Pawlenty’s Presidential aspirations.
Read more at Ammoland.com: http://www.ammoland.com/2011/08/17/political-elite-with-concealed-carry-permits-a-symptom-of-only-ones-not-support-for-gun-rights/#ixzz2FGW9zxJu

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Republicans consider ending Iowa straw poll, in post election reset

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This is from Fox News Politics.

It is not only time to reform Iowa but New Hampshire.

There many things that need fixed with the primary system.

The GOP needs to take a hard look at the complete process.

 

DES MOINES, Iowa –  In the days since Republicans lost an election many in the party thought was theirs, chatter has been bubbling about what the GOP should do to recover.

For Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, it starts with the smallest of actions: abandoning the state’s now-infamous straw poll.

Once a festive checkpoint on the road to the leadoff Iowa caucuses, the poll has devolved into a full-blown sideshow, Branstad and other critics contend. They say it’s an unfair and false test that has felled good candidates and kept others from competing in the state.

“It’s just something that’s gotten totally out of control,” said veteran GOP presidential campaign consultant Charlie Black. “It’s been bad for years, but no one has had the guts to say it until now.”

The poll, which morphed over the decades into a closely watched early test of caucus campaign strength, had “outlived its usefulness,” Branstad told The Wall Street Journal this week. Some activists contend it amplifies the voices of candidates lacking broad appeal.

Branstad says he has widespread support for a different event to replace the poll, held in Ames the summer before every contested presidential caucus since 1979. It has become a lavish affair where campaigns spend heavily to wine, dine, entertain and chauffeur their supporters by bus to the Iowa State University campus.

Critics have increasingly called it a shakedown. Not only do campaigns buy up thousands of tickets for their supporters to attend the event, they bid thousands of dollars for prime spots to pitch tents near the voting area on the college campus.

It’s all to show early support in Iowa, where the precinct caucuses traditionally lead off the early-state nominating march, even though only a fraction of caucusgoers turn out for the straw poll.

“It’s a tedious effort. It costs a lot of money. It’s totally irrelevant at the end of the day. It used to be a test of organization,” said Ed Rollins, who managed Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann’s presidential campaign at the time she won the 2012 straw poll. “Today it’s a lot of effort and a lot of energy that really is not worth the effort.”

Bachmann spent $2 million on the August straw poll and edged Texas Rep. Ron Paul with heavy support from religious conservatives.

“The straw poll doesn’t provide a complete cross-section of the caucus-going electorate,” said Phil Musser, an adviser to former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty.

Pawlenty pinned his hopes on a strong finish in Ames last year but dropped out of the race for the GOP nomination after finishing third, never reaching the caucuses in his neighboring state.

Only about 17,000 turned out for the straw poll, one-seventh the size of the roughly 120,000 who voted on caucus night in January.

John McCain, the GOP’s nominee in 2008, and onetime favorite Rudy Giuliani opted not to compete for the straw poll, turned off by the event’s heavy influence by Christian conservatives. They ran scaled down caucus campaigns as a result.

Romney did not compete in the 2011 straw poll, choosing to project himself as a national candidate who didn’t need to define himself among the Iowa GOP’s rank and file.

But in 2007, Romney spent millions and won, only to struggle to a second-place caucus finish. A month later, he quit the race.

During that campaign, the former Massachusetts governor was so struck by the ferocity of opposition by Iowa Republican activists to illegal immigration that he tacked to the right to distinguish himself from Giuliani and McCain, who supported relaxed sanctions for illegal immigrants.

Doug Gross, a leading Iowa Republican who chaired Romney’s 2008 Iowa campaign, said Romney’s strong opposition to any pathway to citizenship or tuition benefits for illegal immigrants hurt him in the general election four years later against Obama, partly due to his effort to appeal to Iowa conservatives at the straw poll.

The straw poll “forces them to deal with extremists and you can’t help but have some of that rub off on you,” Gross said. “That hurts our ability to nominate candidates who can win.”

Advocates of the straw poll argue the money helps finance the caucuses, which are party-run, not state-run, elections.

Instead, Branstad’s allies are urging the party to substitute the straw poll with a summer fundraiser, without a vote.

Without the straw poll, the caucuses may lure back all top-tier Republican contenders, Branstad’s supporters say. That would raise the stakes for the caucuses by making them truly the first event to winnow the field.

“(The straw poll) was great in its time,” said Iowa GOP strategist John Stineman. “It’s time to move on.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/11/24/republicans-consider-ending-iowa-straw-poll-in-post-election-regroup/?test=latestnews#ixzz2DBRU3z44

 

 

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