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Ronald Reagan’s Thanksgiving Day Proclamation 1981

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This is a message of Hope by one of the greatest men to become president.

Date: November 12, 1981

By: Ronald Reagan

America has much for which to be thankful. The unequaled freedom enjoyed by our citizens has provided a harvest of plenty to this nation throughout its history. In keeping with America’s heritage, one day each year is set aside for giving thanks to God for all of His blessings. On this day of thanksgiving, it is appropriate that we recall the first thanksgiving, celebrated in the autumn of 1621. After surviving a bitter winter, the Pilgrimsplanted and harvested a bountiful crop. After the harvest they gathered their families together and joined in celebration and prayer with the Native Americans who had taught them so much. Clearly our forefathers were thankful not only for the material well being of their harvest but for this abundance of goodwill as well.

In this spirit, Thanksgiving has become a day when Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Long before there was a government welfare program, this spirit of voluntary giving was ingrained in the American character. Americans have always understood that, truly, one must give in order to receive. This should be a day of giving as well as a day of thanks. As we celebrate Thanksgiving in 1981, we should reflect on the full meaning of this day as we enjoy the fellowship that is so much a part of the holiday festivities. Searching our hearts, we should ask what we can do sass individuals to demonstrate our gratitude to God for all He has done. Such reflection can only add to the significance of this precious day of remembrance.

Let us recommit ourselves to that devotion to God and family that has played such an important role in making this a great Nation, and which will be needed as a source of strength if we are to remain a great people. Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 26, 1981, as Thanksgiving Day. In witness where of, I have here unto set my hand this twelfth day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

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It was 239 years ago today: The name “United States of America” becomes official

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This is from the National Constitutional Center.

On September 9, 1776, the Second Continental Congress adopted a new name for what had been called “the United Colonies.” The moniker United States of America has remained since then as a symbol of freedom and independence.

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Benjamin Franklin popularized the concept of a political union in his famous “Join, Or Die” cartoon in 1754. A generation later, the concept of unity became a reality.

Thomas Jefferson is credited as being the first person to come up with the name, as he was drafting the Declaration of Independence. In June 1776, Jefferson’s draft version of the Declaration started with the following sentence:

“A Declaration of the Representatives of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, in General Congress assembled.”

The final version of the Declaration starts with the date July 4, 1776 and the following statement: “The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America.”

Richard Henry Lee of Virginia had used the name “United Colonies” in a June resolution to Congress: “Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved,” Lee wrote.

These thoughts are included in the Declaration’s final paragraph.

“We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States,” it reads.

On Monday, September 9, 1776, the Congress moved to approve some important resolutions, including payments for the army. The fifth resolution read as follows: “That in all continental commissions, and other instruments, where, heretofore, the words ‘United Colonies’ have been used, the stile be altered for the future to the “United States.”

John C. Fitzpatrick from the Library of Congress, back in 1920, explained the origin of “United Colonies” and the abbreviation “U.S.A.” in an article for the Daughters of the American Revolution magazine.

Fitzpatrick said the words United Colonies were used by the Congress when it appointed George Washington as commander in chief in June 1775. The abbreviation U.S.A. had its origins as a way that government inspectors approved official gunpowder. Fitzpatrick said the army needed to have inspectors verify that gunpowder met certain standards, and it stamped “U.S.A.” on the casks as a mark, starting in August 1776,

Also, the words “United States of America” appeared in the first draft of the Articles of Confederation on July 8, 1776, as it was submitted to Congress. The Articles weren’t ratified by the states until March 1781.

The 10 Countries with the Most Guns in Private Hands

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This is from OutDoorHub.

I was surprised by some of the countries on the list.

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Somebody should probably tell this man about trigger discipline. Image from Yann on the Wikimedia Commons

Every wonder which countries have the most firepower in private hands? This article lists off those nations. Unlike most lists that cover this subject, ours will be based on total amount of privately-owned firearms rather than guns per capita.

Data is taken from Small Arms Survey.

Honorable mentions that didn’t make the top 10 include Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Serbia, and Finland.

10. Canada

  • Estimated private firearms: 9,950,000
  • 31 guns per 100 residents

We expected Canada to be a lot higher on this list but the True North barely squeezed by into the top 10. Canada does have a long and rich history of gun ownership, and experts say that more and more young people are getting involved in shooting sports. However, a lengthy and complicated process to purchase firearms dissuades many from buying their own.

Check out our list of guns that are available in Canada but not the United States here.

9. Thailand

  • Estimated private firearms: 10,000,000
  • 16 guns per 100 residents

On a single road in Bangkok, over 80 gun shops fight and jostle for customers to enter their shops or check their stalls. This is indicative of the reverent gun culture in Thailand—one that is a match for the United States. Actually purchasing a firearm is still a long and demanding process, but that does not stop residents from being armed. Firearms are much more expensive in Thailand than in the States, and the same brand-name guns that are widely available elsewhere can cost up to five times higher in the Asian nation. This is due to the fact that there are few gun manufacturers in Thailand and most weapons are imported. Most of the guns there are American or Chinese-made.

“Consumers for firearms in Thailand are mostly middle to upper class,” Firearms Association of Thailand’s Polpatr Tanomsup told CNN. “They want better quality, because if they imported China-made guns, it would not be much cheaper than American-made firearms, and the quality for American is much higher. It is collectible, easy to sell, easy to buy, easy to get parts.”

8. Yemen

  • Estimated private firearms: 11,500,000
  • 55 guns per 100 residents

If there is a country that can outmatch the United States in gun ownership, it might be Yemen. It is nearly mandatory for residents to own at least one firearm, and almost wherever you go, you will find guns up for grab. Uncertain about their future, the people of Yemen rely on their trusty firearms for protection.

“In Yemen, no matter if you’re rich or poor, you must have guns. Even if it’s just one piece,” Abdul Wahab al-Ammari, a tribal sheikh from Yemen’s Ibb province, told The Atlantic. “I have maybe 14 high powered weapons, and 3 handguns [at home].”

7. Brazil

  • Estimated private firearms: 14,840,000
  • 8 guns per 100 residents

Unlike Yemen, one of the world’s poorest nations, Brazil is a rising star on the global stage. Like most of the nations on this list, gun ownership is not a legal right in Brazil. Residents have to be at least 25 years old to apply for a ownership permit, which must be renewed every three years, and actual carry permits are hard to obtain. Despite these hurdles, gun ownership remains popular in Brazil and being home to notable manufacturers like Taurus makes the country the second-largest gun-producing nation in the Western Hemisphere.

6. Mexico

  • Estimated private firearms: 15,500,000
  • 15 guns per 100 residents

Previously, Mexico’s constitution guaranteed the right to bear arms. The current version limits that right to only keeping arms, and in practice, gun ownership is heavily restricted. In some of Mexico’s more dangerous areas, security forces are spread thin and residents are called upon to defend themselves with their own firearms.

5. Pakistan

  • Estimated private firearms: 18,000,000
  • 12 guns per 100 residents

Home of the notorious Khyber Pass and its gun “industry,” it comes as no surprise that Pakistan made it onto this list. Amateur and experienced gunsmiths alike work in the Khyber Pass region, producing unlicensed and, in many cases, homemade-quality firearms from materials like railway rails and scrap metal.

4. Germany

  • Estimated private firearms: 25,000,000
  • 30 guns per 100 residents

Whether it’s for hunting wild boar or sport shooting, guns are very popular in Germany. Commonplace though they might be, Germany has severe restrictions on what kind of guns one can buy, and applicants for gun ownership must prove a need before being issued a permit. Self-defense isn’t necessarily an accepted reason. Nonetheless, German gun owners say that such regulations are expected.

“On the one hand, we think, ‘Oh, it’s very restrictive, and we don’t like that,’” sport shooter Friedrich Gepperth told NPR. “On the other hand, each case of misuse by a legal gun owner is very bad for us, so we are not going against the restrictions very much.”

3. China

  • Estimated private firearms: 40,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Surprised to see this country on the list? Despite having some of the strictest gun laws in the world—a blanket ban on private firearm ownership—gun culture seems to be taking hold. How is this possible? With a multitude of shooting and hunting clubs, guns are once again finding their place back into Chinese hands. According to some, it’s hard not to romanticize firearms due to their popularity in film and television.

“In the 1960s, shooting was for national defense,” Xie Xianqiao, a former shooting coach, told The Wall Street Journal. “These days, shooting is entertainment.”

That said, private ownership without the proper permits can still lead to a hefty fine and lengthy prison sentence. Crimes committed with a firearm often receive the death penalty.

2. India

  • Estimated private firearms: 45,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Guns in the world’s most populous democracy are both protection and a status symbol. Proper firearms are expensive—enough to be included in dowries—and a single 1911 pistol can sell for several times its asking US price. Domestically-produced guns are available, but lack the reliability and style of foreign-made firearms. Concern over sexual attacks have also led to guns becoming more popular among women—as well as fathers.

Bank manager Jagdeep Singh says he keeps a pistol on his hip to fight off bandits during long car rides, but it also gives him safety of mind when he’s home.

“I have two good-looking daughters,” he told The Los Angeles Times, “another reason I keep a gun.”

1. United States of America

  • Estimated private firearms: 270,000,000
  • 89 guns per 100 residents

Was there ever really any doubt that we’d be number one on this list? The United States of America is by far the best country in the world to be in if you want to own guns. The constitutional right to keep and bear arms (where it isn’t infringed upon by local law), combined with large popular support for gun ownership and easy availability, make the United States a gun collector’s dream.

STAND STRONG FOR US, BIBI! An Open Letter to the Leader of the Free World

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This is from Clash Daily.

 

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mage: http://www.darkmoon.me/2012/mad-dog-america-by-paul-craig-roberts/

 

Dear Prime Minister Netanyahu,

On behalf of the American people, not the American government, I’d like to welcome you to the United States of America, and we sincerely hope you enjoy your visit to our great nation. As you well know, the American government is not a true representation of her people. And as our government wallows in its own corruption, occupying it’s time with bitter partisan infighting about who has the authority to invite a world leader to speak before congress or which would-be, tiny-minded tyrant will fabricate an excuse not to be present at your address, I just wanted to take a moment to remind you that “They”are not “us”.

You see “They”, the 537 members of our congress (House, Senate, President and Vice President) are the least among the people of the United States. They are not indicative of the aspirations, ethics or morality of the majority of this nation. Although they may be the most ambitious, the most power-focused, the most corruptible of our population, they are in no way related to the goals, aspirations or the true understanding of liberty’s virtues, requirements and sacrifices like the people they hope to govern. For the most part, they are clowns, and they have provided quite a few laughs to dictators and killers all over the world.

America has abdicated her Super Power status in the eyes of the world. She is no longer the bastion of freedom she once was; that shining city on a hill has become faded and tarnished with age. As such Prime Minister, we look to you to draw the line, hold the fort, stand your ground against the evil that is rising in the world. We look to you to take the wheel until we right the ship of this great nation and steer her back onto the course promised by our founders.

Be patient and strong, sir. We will fix things; we will make amends to the world and our allies for the diplomatic and military circus that has become American foreign policy for the past generation. But for now we need you to stand strong for all of western civilization until we can rid our American henhouse of the traitorous foxes which have found their way to positions of power.

We trust you, Prime Minister. We understand the close bond between our two nations. We, the American people, have only love, respect and comradery for Israel, her people and her traditions, and we sincerely apologize for the schism that has emerged between our nations.
We were tricked. We won’t be tricked again.

So, for now, thank you. Thank you for being the strength needed to defend western civilization. Thank you for being the stone wall, protecting us from the rising tide of evil. But most of all, thank you for not giving up on us as a nation; for not turning your back on us, as it seems we have done to you. Thank you for defending our principals, even when it seems we are in retreat.

For now, you’re the leader of the free world. We trust you, sir. The world’s battle lines are drawn. Lead. We’re right behind you.

The July 4th Question: 238 Years After The First Revolution, Is It Time For A Second?

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This is from Town Hall.

I can hear our Founding Fathers saying “We started a war with the greatest military power at that time for a lot less.

“What are you waiting for an invitation to be Patriots?”

 

 

Let’s start with a shocking, but true premise: If you are a patriotic American, you believe that there are circumstances under which it is right to take up arms against your own government. That statement feels wrong to me. It reeks of militia and McVeigh and toothless loons holed up with guns in cabins in order to avoid paying income taxes.

But the fact remains that the rationale for the existence of the nation known as the United States of America, which first appeared in print 238 years ago today, is entirely dependent on the premise that there are indeed times “…when in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another…” and that such times may require the first group of people to “…mutually pledge to each other [their] Lives, [their] Fortunes and [their] sacred Honor.” And that having dissolved those political bands with another people, the newly liberated people (“…and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War…”) may, among other things, protect themselves from a tyrannical power which engages in “…a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object [which] evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism…”

This is the argument presented to the world by Adams, Jefferson, and Franklin. It was adopted and approved by the Continental Congress. It has been graphically represented in the Great Seal of the United States and it is treated as the origin of the American Republic not just in the Declaration of Independence itself, but also in the Constitution.

That last truth has been denied both by legal positivists on the left and by paleo-conservatives on the right, both intending to sever the Constitution from its roots in natural law, but for differing reasons. The legal positivists want to liberate the courts from the shackles of natural law, so that they might reinvent the American Republic. The Old Right wanted to sever the Constitution from the impetus of natural law which they believed would be used to create new ‘rights’ which would be imposed by judicial tyranny. I debated Robert Bork on this question several years ago and he was very strong in his insistence that the Constitution did not acknowledge the Declaration. The problem with that assertion is that it is contradicted by the concluding section of the Constitution itself, which states that it was “[… ] done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth. In Witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our Names.”

In other words the Constitution was signed in the fall of 1787, which was during the 12th year of the United States, which places the event which initiated the Republic sometime before September 1776. Is there any other event, save the Declaration, which would fit the historical bill? Of course not. And just in case any would argue, as Bork tried to in our debate, that this is simply a matter of a date to which no significance can be attributed, I would point out that the Great Seal of the United States, which was the result of several years of deliberation, labels the foundation (it is a literal architectural foundation at the base of a pyramid) with the Roman numerals for the year 1776. In short, the Declaration and the principles on which it is based are the foundational ideas of our Republic. One can deny their truth, but one cannot deny their legal authority.

This implies something very important: No governmental official can deny the right of the people to dissolve the political bands which tie them to a tyrannical government, without at the same time denying the Declaration and, by extension, the Constitution on which his own power is based. If he says, “The Declaration no longer applies; you must obey my authority no matter what.” We can rightly reply, “If the Declaration no longer applies, then the government of which you are a part no longer possesses legitimacy; which means you have no authority in the first place and therefore have no right to demand that we obey.”

To determine whether the framers and their principles would cause us once again to break from a central political authority one must first get into the head space of the founders. Their way of thinking, though alien to modern political philosophy (and so much the worse for modern political philosophy), is clear and cogent:

There are certain ideas which are self-evidently true. One of those ideas is that we are created without legal primacy or inferiority with regard to one another. Another idea, which is just obviously true to people whose rational faculties are operating properly, is that the rights to life and liberty and the pursuit of a prosperous life (which is what the word ‘happiness’ meant in 1776) are not alienable, that is they cannot have a lien placed on them by any other persons, not even representatives of the state.

Not only is government denied the authority to put a lien on and repossess those rights, but it is further required to protect those rights. And in fact, the protecting of those rights is the only reason that government should exist in the first place! And not only is it necessary for government to protect these rights, but its use of power to do so is still only just if it also involves the consent of the people whose freedom and property are being protected. Further (and this is shocking, even to modern ears), when governments move from protecting those rights to injuring those rights, the people are allowed to erase the authority of the government.

So, are we there yet? That question is in the air, although I don’t think I’ve heard it put so explicitly in terms of the context of the Fourth of July, 1776. Pop culture blockbusters such as the Batman franchise are preoccupied with the question of legal legitimacy. The Tea Party movement, as is obvious just by the name, suggests that we are bumping up against the limits of legitimacy. The Occupy movement by its rhetoric and its actions at least denies the legitimacy of the property rights of the individuals on whose land it squats, and the legitimacy of the powers of the police who order it to disperse. A slew of soured grapes outbursts after the failure of the union-led Wisconsin recall vote suggested that democracy had died. Even occasional wingnut outbursts on MSNBC suggest that a forceful change of government is now called for.

Some people want to banish this conversation from polite company, but doing so does not ban the conversation from occurring; it just bans polite conversationalists from adding their influence to the debate. The greatest beneficiaries of this approach are groups at the fringe who live to incite people to violence.

No amount of banning or inciting can change the facts. 238 years ago the principles of the Declaration found that the central government had lost the right to rule and called on the people to withdraw allegiance to it. Is that the case now? Even the most ardent believer in the American experiment (and I am a very ardent one) has to acknowledge that the verdict of history is that no state remains committed to liberty forever, which means that such a time will come again. The question is whether we are there now. Tell me what you think, and then I’ll tell you what I think.

This article originally appeared on Forbes.com

My Name Is Old Glory

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This is from USA Patriotism.com.

 

I am the flag of the United States of America
My name is Old Glory.

I fly atop the world’s tallest buildings.
I stand watch in America’s halls of justice.
I fly majestically over great institutes of learning.
I stand guard with the greatest military power in the world.
Look up! And see me!

I stand for peace, honor, truth, and justice.
I stand for freedom.
I am confident . . . I am arrogant.
I am proud.

When I am flown with my fellow banners,
my head is a little higher,
my colors a little truer.

I bow to no one.
I am recognized all over the world.
I am worshipped.
I am saluted.
I am respected.
I am revered. I am loved.
And I am feared.

I have fought every battle of every war for more than 200 years…
Gettysburg, Shilo, Appomatox, San Juan Hill, the trenches of France,
the Argonne Forest, Anzio, Rome, the beaches of Normandy,
the deserts of Africa, the cane fields of the Philippines,
the rice paddies and jungles of Guam, Okinawa, Japan, Korea, Vietnam,
and a score of places long forgotten by all but those who were with me.

I was there!

I led my soldiers.
I followed them.
I watched over them…
They loved me.

I was on a small hill in Iwo Jima.
I was dirty, battle-worn and tired,
but my soldiers cheered me,
and I was proud.

I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of countries
I have helped set free.
It does not hurt . . . for I am invincible.
I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of my country,
and when it is by those with whom I have served in battle . . . it hurts.
But I shall overcome . . . for I am strong.

I have slipped the bonds of Earth
and stand watch over the uncharted new frontiers of space
from my vantage point on the moon.

I have been a silent witness to all of America’s finest hours.
But my finest hour comes
when I am torn into strips to be used for bandages
for my wounded comrades on the field of battle.
when I fly at half mast to honor my soldiers…
and when I lie in the trembling arms
of a grieving mother at the graveside of her fallen son.

I am proud.
My name is Old Glory.
Dear God . . . Long may I wave!

SMSgt. Don S. Miller, USAF (Ret.)
Copyright © 1983
Relisted January 9, 2009

Author’s Note… “My Name is Old Glory” was my way of remembering my brother,
Gunnery Sergeant John F. Miller, US Marine Corps.

Editor’s Note… USA Patriotism! has confirmed through the US Copyright office and other
documents that Don Miller is the author of “My Name is Old Glory” regardless of who
might be listed as the author elsewhere.

 

Ronald Reagan’s Thanksgiving Day Proclamation 1981

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Ronald-Reagan-Photos

This is a message of Hope by one of the greatest men to become president.

 

 

Date: November 12, 1981
By: Ronald Reagan

America has much for which to be thankful. The unequaled freedom enjoyed by our citizens has provided a harvest of plenty to this nation throughout its history. In keeping with America’s heritage, one day each year is set aside for giving thanks to God for all of His blessings. On this day of thanksgiving, it is appropriate that we recall the first thanksgiving, celebrated in the autumn of 1621. After surviving a bitter winter, the Pilgrims planted and harvested a bountiful crop. After the harvest they gathered their families together and joined in celebration and prayer with the Native Americans who had taught them so much. Clearly our forefathers were thankful not only for the material well being of their harvest but for this abundance of goodwill as well.

In this spirit, Thanksgiving has become a day when Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Long before there was a government welfare program, this spirit of voluntary giving was ingrained in the American character. Americans have always understood that, truly, one must give in order to receive. This should be a day of giving as well as a day of thanks. As we celebrate Thanksgiving in 1981, we should reflect on the full meaning of this day as we enjoy the fellowship that is so much a part of the holiday festivities. Searching our hearts, we should ask what we can do sass individuals to demonstrate our gratitude to God for all He has done. Such reflection can only add to the significance of this precious day of remembrance.

Let us recommit ourselves to that devotion to God and family that has played such an important role in making this a great Nation, and which will be needed as a source of strength if we are to remain a great people. Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 26, 1981, as Thanksgiving Day. In witness where of, I have here unto set my hand this twelfth day of November, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

The True Meaning of Memorial Day

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We owe every man and woman who have ever worn

the uniform of The United States of America.

We owe these men and women more than we could repay.

All Gave Some and Some Gave All.

Lest We Should Forget.

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