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61 Years Ago Today

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61 Yeas ago today Hiram King (Hank) Williams Sr. passed from Country Music Star

into the realm of Country Music Super Star.

Hank began this  journey on Monday September 17, 1923  Mount Olive, Alabama.

Hanks family moved to Gerorgianna, Alabama where Hank met a black street singer named

Rufus “Tee Tot“Payne.

Tee Tot gave you Hank guitar lessons for money or food.

Tee Tot had a great influence on the Hanks music style in later years.

Hiram unofficially changed his name to Hank because it’s a better fitting name for Country Music.

Hank moved to Montgomery, Alabama he got a job at WSFA Radio 1937  Hank was billed as the

Singing Kid it was a fifteen minute show that started  his music career.

After recording “Never Again” and “Honky Tonkin'” with Sterling Records, he signed a contract with MGM Records. In 1948 he released “Move it on Over“, which became a hit, and also joined the Louisiana Hayride radio program. One year later, he released a cover of “Lovesick Blues“, which carried him into the mainstream of music. After an initial rejection, Williams joined the Grand Ole Opry. He had 11 number one songs between 1948 and 1953, though he was unable to read or notate music to any significant degree. Among the hits he wrote were “Your Cheatin’ Heart“, “Hey, Good Lookin’“, and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry“.

Several years of back pain, alcoholism and prescription drug abuse severely deteriorated Williams’s health; he divorced Audrey and was dismissed by the Grand Ole Opry, citing unreliability and frequent drunkenness. 

Williams was scheduled to perform at the Municipal Auditorium in Charleston, West Virginia on Wednesday December 31, 1952. Advance ticket sales totaled US$3,500. That day, because of an ice storm in the Nashville area, Williams could not fly, so he hired a college student, Charles Carr, to drive him to the concerts. Carr called the Charleston auditorium from Knoxville to say that Williams would not arrive on time owing to the ice storm and was ordered to drive Williams to Canton, Ohio, for the New Year’s Day concert there.[57]

They arrived at the Andrew Johnson Hotel in Knoxville, Tennessee, where Carr requested a doctor for Williams, as he was feeling the combination of the chloral hydrate and alcohol he had drunk on the way from Montgomery to Knoxville.[58] Dr. P.H. Cardwell injected Williams with two shots of vitamin B12 that also contained a quarter-grain of morphine. Carr and Williams checked out of the hotel, the porters had to carry Williams to the car, as he was coughing and hiccuping.[59] At around midnight on Thursday January 1, 1953, when they crossed the Tennessee state line and arrived in Bristol, Virginia, Carr stopped at a small all-night restaurant and asked Williams if he wanted to eat. Williams said he did not, and those are believed to be his last words.[60] Carr later drove on until he stopped for fuel at a gas station in Oak Hill, West Virginia, where he realized that Williams was dead. The filling station’s owner called the chief of the local police.[61] In Williams’ Cadillac the police found some empty beer cans and unfinished handwritten lyrics.

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Walter Williams: Americans misunderstand point of the Second Amendment

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This is from The Daily Caller.

Walter Williams explains the Second Amendment.

I could not get the video to embed you can see it at the link above.

Author and economist Walter Williams told The Daily Caller that the purpose of the Second Amendment is to protect Americans from their own government — not simply to ensure hunting rights.

Williams, a syndicated columnist and the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, suggested that common misconceptions about the Second Amendment undermine the gun control debate.

“[The Founding Fathers‘] stated reason was to allow the American people to protect themselves from the United States Congress — that is, government. That’s why we have the Second Amendment,” he said.

“A lot of people are saying we should somehow control or restrict arms,” he continued. “And I would ask the question: Are we under any less a threat of tyranny from Washington than we were in 1787? And I would say no.”

Rifles and guns may not be able to stand up against the government’s tanks and fighter planes, Williams acknowledged, but he said history shows that small, outmatched resistance movements can still be successful.

“If push comes to shove, Americans would at least have a means to offer some kind of resistance, as people have done around the world.”

Guns also help deter crime, Williams said, citing a study that rapists are less likely to strike when women in the community take shooting lessons.

“[Rapists] are cowards, and if they think women can defend themselves, they’ll restrain their behavior or think twice,” he said. “The gun industry makes all kinds of interesting holsters where women can carry their guns, such as the bra holster. Guy acts like rape? ‘Well, yeah, let me get undressed, and then politely blow the guy away.’”

Look for the full interview with Williams on Monday.

Mrs. Thomas does not necessarily support or endorse the products, services or positions promoted in any advertisement contained herein, and does not have control over or receive compensation from any advertiser.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2013/01/13/walter-williams-americans-misunderstand-the-point-of-the-second-amendment/#ixzz2I0kK1eaP

Court rules N.Y. shooting victim can sue gun maker, distributor

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This is from Yahoo News.

This is a BS ruling from the New York State Appeals Court.

The gun manufacturer and distributor are not responsible for the shooting.

James Bostic fraudulently bought the gun as he was a felon.

Why didn’t the NICS check flag him as a felon?

The FBI/NICS is to blame for James Bostic being able to buy the guns.

ALBANY, New York (Reuters) – A Buffalo man who was shot nearly a decade ago can sue the manufacturer, the distributor and the dealer of the semi-automatic pistol used to shoot him, a New York state appeals court ruled on Friday.

Attorneys for Daniel Williams, who was shot in 2003 when he was in high school, argued that Ohio-based manufacturer Beemiller and the distributor, MKS Supply, violated federal law by knowingly supplying guns to irresponsible dealers.

The defendants said they cannot be sued because of the federal Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, a 2005 law that shields firearm manufacturers and sellers from liability for harm caused by the criminal misuse of their non-defective products.

A unanimous panel of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, on Friday reversed a 2011 ruling that threw out the case against the defendants – Beemiller, MKS Supply and gun dealer Charles Brown, who sold the guns to James Bostic, a Buffalo resident accused of running a trafficking scheme that funneled guns into the black market in New York.

The decision reinstates the case.

The Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which is representing Williams, claims Bostic is a convicted felon and is barred from purchasing guns, according to the ruling.

The center said Bostic traveled to Ohio, which does not require a license to buy a gun, to procure a large numbers of handguns, including the pistol used to shoot Williams, the ruling said.

“Although the complaint does not specify the statutes allegedly violated (by the defendants), it sufficiently alleges facts supporting a finding that defendants knowingly violated federal gun laws,” Justice Erin Peradotto wrote for the court.

Jeffrey Malsch, a lawyer for MKS, said he is reviewing the decision.

“We believe (the lower court’s ruling) was a courageous and legally correct decision, but the Fourth Department was unwilling to follow his well reasoned opinion,” he said. “Whether we appeal or not, we are confident that ultimately the facts will contradict the baseless allegations in the complaint and the case will be dismissed.”

Attorneys for Williams and the remaining defendants did not immediately return requests for comment.

 

 

 

Andy Williams, ‘Moon River’ Singer, Dies at 84

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This is from People.com.

I enjoyed some of Andy’s music.

Rest In Peace Andy.

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Andy Williams, whose corn-fed good looks, easygoing charm and smooth rendition of “Moon River” propelled him to the heights of music stardom in the early ’60s, died Tuesday at his home in Branson, Mo., following a battle with bladder cancer, his family announced.

He was 84, and 2012 had marked his 75th year in showbiz. Williams is survived by his wife Debbie and his three children, Robert, Noelle and Christian.

With 17 gold and three platinum records to his name, Williams enjoyed his golden years playing golf and dividing his time between La Quinta, Calif., and Branson, where he appeared at his Andy Williams Moon River Theater since 1992.

It was on the stage of that theater, in November 2011, Williams announced he had bladder cancer. At the time, he assured fans the disease was no longer a death sentence and that he had every intention of being a survivor.

Born in Wall Lake, Iowa, the son of a railroad worker, Howard Andrew WIlliams sang in his family’s church choir with older siblings Bob, Dick and Don. In the late ’30s, the boys built up a name for themselves regionally on Midwestern radio stations as the Williams Brothers quartet.

After the war, in 1947, they joined entertainer Kay Thompson in her innovative and sophisticated nightclub act. In his 2009 memoir Moon River and Me, Williams admitted he had a long affair with Thompson, who had been a legendary vocal coach at MGM (she taught Judy Garland and Lena Horne to sing for the screen) and was 18 years the senior of her handsome young protégé.

In 1952, when the brothers’ act broke up, Andy launched his solo career, only to find himself broke and without bookings. Giving himself one last shot, he wisely switched his repertoire from clever Noël Coward ditties to the latest pop hits, and his New York club appearances soon included singing spots on the Tonight show (which was in Manhattan at the time), then regular TV shots and a Columbia Records contract.

By the early ’60s he had an easy-listening hit under his belt, “Can’t Get Used to Losing You,” though it was his romantic take on the Best Song Oscar winner from 1961’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s, “Moon River,” that landed him on the map – and kept him there.

The smash hit recording led to NBC’s 1962 launch of The Andy Williams Show, which remained on the air until 1971 and then returned as an annual Christmas special. It was on the variety weekly program in 1963 that Williams introduced to America a group of young singing siblings from Utah, The Osmond Brothers.

Despite his own clean-cut good looks – the Williams signature look was a turtleneck under a brightly colored pullover sweater – scandal did touch Williams’s life. In the mid-1970s, his ex-wife, French dancer Claudine Longet, went on trial in Aspen for the fatal shooting of her lover, international skiing star Vladimir (“Spider”) Sabich.

In the end, Longet, who claimed the shooting was an accident, was found guilty of misdemeanor criminal negligence and received only a 30-day sentence, which she served on and off at her convenience. In his 2009 memoir, Williams, who during the trial had accompanied his ex-wife to the courtroom on a daily basis, continued to defend her innocence.

Longet and Williams were married from 1961 to 1975 and had three children together: Noelle, Christian, and Robert. They survive him, as does his second wife (since 1991), Debbie Williams.

 

 

The Legacy-of-Slavery Excuse Debunked

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This is from the Patriot Update.

The folks at the Southern Poverty Law Center are nuts.

They make some of the most outrageous claims about race.

I like the BS line about the burden of the legacy of slavery.

The Great Society is the problem with black families.

The black families are fatherless.

A local school district in Florida is being sued by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) because more of its black students as a percentage of the student population are disciplined than white students.  The SPLC claims this is because black students are unfairly singled out for punishment.  Apparently no one at the SPLC thought to ask the obvious question: Could it be that more black students break the rules than white students?  After all, even a cursory examination of the data state or nationwide will show that absenteeism, tardiness, poor grades, high dropout rates, drug use, and violent crime are higher among black students than white, Asian, or Hispanic students.

However, liberals and their leftwing organizations tend to ignore data that does not support their preconceived notions or fit their political agendas.  Liberals simply ignore the data on absenteeism, tardiness, bad grades, dropout rates, drug use, and crime for black students, and when they cannot ignore it they have a ready-made excuse to explain it away: the legacy of slavery.  According to liberal apologists, black students who perform poorly in school do so because they still carry the burden of slavery in their genes.

But the “legacy” excuse quickly breaks down because there are plenty of young black students who not only perform well in school, but out perform their white, Asian, and Hispanic counterparts, and these high achievers carry the same so-called legacy burden as other black students.  A widely-recognized example of such a high achiever is Dr. Ben Carson, the world-renowned brain surgeon.   As a young black student from the inner city, Dr. Carson had all of the disadvantages that liberals use to excuse black students who perform poorly. But Carson refused to make excuses.  Instead he studied hard, persevered, and transformed his life.  Now he spends his time saving lives.

The hard truth that liberals refuse to accept is that black students who do poorly in school do so for the same reasons as other students who do poorly: because they do not take school seriously.  If they go to school at all, they misbehave, skip classes, and refuse to cooperate with teachers, complete assignments, do homework, or study.  And if this kind of behavior is not bad enough, these marginal students use peer pressure, intimidation, and beatings to hold back other black students who are serious about school. One of the most dangerous things a young black student can do in some schools is work hard to succeed.

Conservative economist Walter Williams had this to say about the legacy-of-slavery excuse: “A ‘legacy of slavery’ surely cannot explain problems among blacks, unless we assume it skips whole generations.  In my book ‘Race and Economics’ (Hoover Press, 2011), I cite studies showing that in New York in 1925, 85 percent of black households were two-parent households.  In 1880 in Philadelphia, three-quarters of black families were composed of two parents and children…Both during slavery and as late as 1920, a black teenage girl raising a child without a man present was rare.”

There is a strong correlation between the school performance of black students—as well as other students—and their home situation.  The point Professor Williams makes in his book is that the modern welfare state has crippled the black family and rendered it fatherless.  Consequently, too many young blacks are growing up with no father to provide expectations, hold them accountable, and to guide them in achieving meeting expectations.  I agree with Dr. Williams, about the effect of the welfare state on the black family and its corresponding effect on the school performance of black students. But even a less-than-desirable home situation should not be used as an excuse for thumbing one’s nose at education.  In fact, it should just make black students—as well as white, Asian, and Hispanic students—even more determined to use school as the means of breaking the cycle of welfare and throwing off the shackles of dependency and despair.

Texas executes man despite his claims of low IQ

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This is from Yahoo News.

If your smart enough to murder someone your smart enough to die.

This argument by the liberals about low IQ is sickening.

I say the argument about the age of the murderer is bogus.

If your old enough to kill your old enough to die.

HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — A Texas man convicted of killing a police informant was executed Tuesday evening after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected arguments that he was too mentally impaired to qualify for the death penalty.

Marvin Wilson, 54, was pronounced dead at 6:27 p.m., 14 minutes after his lethal injection began at the state prison in Huntsville. Wilson’s attorneys had argued that he should have been ineligible for capital punishment because of his low IQ.

In their appeal to the high court, his attorneys pointed to a psychological test conducted in 2004 that pegged Wilson’s IQ at 61, below the generally accepted minimum competency standard of 70.

But lower courts agreed with state attorneys, who argued that Wilson’s claim was based on a single test that may have been faulty and that his mental impairment claim isn’t supported by other tests and assessments of him over the years.

The Supreme Court denied his request for a stay of execution less than two hours before his lethal injection began. Lead defense attorney Lee Kovarsky said he was “gravely disappointed and saddened” by the ruling, calling it “outrageous that the state of Texas continues to utilize unscientific guidelines … to determine which citizens with intellectual disability are exempt from execution.”

Wilson was convicted of murdering 21-year-old Jerry Williams in November 1992, several days after police seized 24 grams of cocaine from Wilson’s apartment and arrested him. Witnesses testified that Wilson and another man, Andrew Lewis, beat Williams outside of a convenience store in Beaumont, about 80 miles east of Houston. Wilson, who was free on bond, accused Williams of snitching on him about the drugs, they said.

Witnesses said Wilson and Lewis then abducted Williams, and neighborhood residents said they heard a gunshot a short time later. Williams was found dead on the side of a road the next day, wearing only socks, severely beaten and shot in the head and neck at close range.

Wilson was arrested the next day when he reported to his parole officer on a robbery conviction for which he served less than four years of a 20-year prison sentence. It was the second time he had been sent to prison for robbery.

At Wilson’s capital murder trial, Lewis’ wife testified that Wilson confessed to the killing in front of her, her husband and his own wife.

“Don’t be mad at Andrew because Andrew did not do it,” Lewis’ wife said Wilson told them. “I did it.”

Lewis received a life prison term for his involvement.

In Wilson’s Supreme Court appeal, Kovarsky said Wilson’s language and math skills “never progressed beyond an elementary school level,” that he reads and writes below a second-grade level and that he was unable to manage his finances, pay bills or hold down a job.

The Supreme Court issued a ruling in 2002 outlawing the execution of the mentally impaired, but left it to states to determine what constitutes mental impairment. Kovarsky argued that Texas is trying to skirt the ban by altering the generally accepted definitions of mental impairment to the point where gaining relief for an inmate is “virtually unobtainable.”

“That neither the courts nor state officials have stopped this execution is not only a shocking failure of a once-promising constitutional commitment, it is also a reminder that, as a society, we haven’t come quite that far in understanding how so many of those around us live with intellectual disabilities,” Kovarsky said shortly after the court refused to stop Wilson’s execution.

State attorneys say the court left it to states to develop appropriate standards for enforcing the ban and that Texas chose to incorporate a number of factors besides an inmate’s IQ, including the inmate’s adaptive behavior and functioning.

Edward Marshall, a Texas assistant attorney general, said records show Wilson habitually gave less than full effort and “was manipulative and deceitful when it suited his interest,” and that the state considered his ability to show personal independence and social responsibility in making its determinations.

“Considering Wilson’s drug-dealing, street-gambler, criminal lifestyle since an early age, he was obviously competent at managing money, and not having a 9-to-5 job is no critical failure,” Marshall said. “Wilson created schemes using a decoy to screen his thefts, hustled for jobs in the community, and orchestrated the execution of the snitch, demonstrating inventiveness, drive and leadership.”

Wilson’s lawyers also had argued that additional DNA tests should be conducted on a gray hair from someone white that was found on Williams’ body, suggesting someone else killed him. Wilson, Williams and Lewis are black.

Ed Shettle, the Jefferson County assistant district attorney who prosecuted Wilson, dismissed the theory of another killer as a “red herring.”

“There was some testimony Marvin said: ‘We’re going to show you what happens to snitches around here,'” Shettle said.

Wilson was the seventh person executed by lethal injection in Texas this year. At least nine other prisoners in the nation’s most active death penalty state have execution dates in the coming months, including one later this month.

 

Charges unlikely against man who shot robbers

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This is from The Gainesville Sun.

We need more people like Samuel Williams.

I think Mr.Williams needs a larger calibre handgun.

OCALA – The Internet cafe patron who shot and injured two men as they tried to rob the business will likely not face any criminal charges.

“Based on what I have seen and what I know at this time, I don’t anticipate filing any charges,” said Bill Gladson of the State Attorney’s Office for 5th Judicial Circuit.

Gladson said he has reviewed the security surveillance video from the cafe. While he still awaits final reports from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, he said the shooting appeared justified.

Samuel Williams, 71, who fired the shots, has a concealed weapons permit, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Under Florida law, a person is allowed to use deadly force if he or she fears death or serious injury to themselves or others. As long as the person isn’t committing a crime and is in a place where he or she has a right to be, they are considered to be acting within the law.

Williams, who lives in Ocala, could not be reached for comment on Monday. But at least one of his 30 fellow patrons at the cafe wants to thank him.

“I think he is wonderful. If he wouldn’t have been there, there could have been some innocent people shot,” said Mary Beach.

Beach was sitting in with her back to the door Friday night and didn’t realize what was happening until she heard shots.

“I heard pop, pop; then pop, pop, pop, all at once,” she said. “In the confusion I never really got to see his (Williams) face.”

Surveillance video of the incident was released on Monday by the Sheriff’s Office. It shows two masked men entering the Palms Internet Cafe, 8444 SW State Road 200 in Ocala, just before 10 p.m. Friday. One of the men had a gun.

Williams was seated toward the back of the cafe dressed in a white shirt, shorts and baseball cap.

One of the masked men, identified as Duwayne Henderson, 19, comes in pointing a handgun at customers. The second man, Davis Dawkins, 19, is seen swinging a bat at something off screen, which was later identified as a $1,200 computer screen.

As Henderson turns his back, Williams pulls out a .380-caliber semi-automatic handgun, stands from his chair, takes two steps, nearly drops to one knee, and fires two shots at Henderson, who bolts for the front door.

Williams takes several more steps toward the door and continues firing as Henderson and Dawkins fall over one another trying to exit the building. The two eventually run off screen.

Both men were shot by Williams. Their wounds were not life-threatening. Each was arrested hours later and charged with attempted armed robbery with a firearm and felony criminal mischief.

Henderson remained in the Marion County Jail late Monday in lieu of a $31,000 bond. Dawkins was released Sunday after posting an $11,000 bond.

Internet cafes are regulated by the state. They offer sweepstakes entries, which are used to buy time on computer terminals that simulate casino-style games. The operations, which have sprung up around the county and the state, are known to deal in cash.

 

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