This is from Weasel Zippers.

The people are finally free of the blood sucking unions.

Workers are no longer forced to support causes they oppose

as the unions are not getting their dues.

Hopefully the unions back can be broken.

 

Public sector unions are bloodsucking leeches draining the taxpayers of this country dry, and they couldn’t do it without the help of Democrats (who they in turn donate millions to).

Via EAGNews:

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says one of the goals behind Act 10, his landmark legislation that clipped the power of most public sector unions, was to give workers more freedom to decide if they wanted to belong to a union.

He’s apparently accomplished his mission. Several of the largest public sector unions in the state have lost thousands of members over the past few years, and a great deal of wealth and political power, as well.

The Wisconsin Education Association Council, the state’s largest teachers union, lost about half of its 98,000 members since Act 10 became law in 2011, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

That means WEAC has lot approximately half of its annual income from membership dues, which has impacted its ability to remain a force on the state political scene.

“The financial pressure has caused the union to cut a large share of its staff,” the news report said. “For a time last year, union executives considered selling WEAC’s prominent hilltop headquarters on the south side of Madison. The union’s board stepped in and put a halt to the idea, according to sources familiar with the matter.”

Other public sector unions have suffered big losses, as well.

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees District Council 48 lost nearly two-thirds of its approximately 9,000 members, the news report said. As a result the union is now more than $650,000 in debt.

AFSCME District Council 40, another branch of the same union, has lost 36 percent of its membership, the news report said.

The Wisconsin State Employees Union has lost more than half of its members, dropping from roughly 22,000 to somewhere between 9,000 and 10,000 members, according to the newspaper.

 

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