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The 10 Countries with the Most Guns in Private Hands

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This is from OutDoorHub.

I was surprised by some of the countries on the list.

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Somebody should probably tell this man about trigger discipline. Image from Yann on the Wikimedia Commons

Every wonder which countries have the most firepower in private hands? This article lists off those nations. Unlike most lists that cover this subject, ours will be based on total amount of privately-owned firearms rather than guns per capita.

Data is taken from Small Arms Survey.

Honorable mentions that didn’t make the top 10 include Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Serbia, and Finland.

10. Canada

  • Estimated private firearms: 9,950,000
  • 31 guns per 100 residents

We expected Canada to be a lot higher on this list but the True North barely squeezed by into the top 10. Canada does have a long and rich history of gun ownership, and experts say that more and more young people are getting involved in shooting sports. However, a lengthy and complicated process to purchase firearms dissuades many from buying their own.

Check out our list of guns that are available in Canada but not the United States here.

9. Thailand

  • Estimated private firearms: 10,000,000
  • 16 guns per 100 residents

On a single road in Bangkok, over 80 gun shops fight and jostle for customers to enter their shops or check their stalls. This is indicative of the reverent gun culture in Thailand—one that is a match for the United States. Actually purchasing a firearm is still a long and demanding process, but that does not stop residents from being armed. Firearms are much more expensive in Thailand than in the States, and the same brand-name guns that are widely available elsewhere can cost up to five times higher in the Asian nation. This is due to the fact that there are few gun manufacturers in Thailand and most weapons are imported. Most of the guns there are American or Chinese-made.

“Consumers for firearms in Thailand are mostly middle to upper class,” Firearms Association of Thailand’s Polpatr Tanomsup told CNN. “They want better quality, because if they imported China-made guns, it would not be much cheaper than American-made firearms, and the quality for American is much higher. It is collectible, easy to sell, easy to buy, easy to get parts.”

8. Yemen

  • Estimated private firearms: 11,500,000
  • 55 guns per 100 residents

If there is a country that can outmatch the United States in gun ownership, it might be Yemen. It is nearly mandatory for residents to own at least one firearm, and almost wherever you go, you will find guns up for grab. Uncertain about their future, the people of Yemen rely on their trusty firearms for protection.

“In Yemen, no matter if you’re rich or poor, you must have guns. Even if it’s just one piece,” Abdul Wahab al-Ammari, a tribal sheikh from Yemen’s Ibb province, told The Atlantic. “I have maybe 14 high powered weapons, and 3 handguns [at home].”

7. Brazil

  • Estimated private firearms: 14,840,000
  • 8 guns per 100 residents

Unlike Yemen, one of the world’s poorest nations, Brazil is a rising star on the global stage. Like most of the nations on this list, gun ownership is not a legal right in Brazil. Residents have to be at least 25 years old to apply for a ownership permit, which must be renewed every three years, and actual carry permits are hard to obtain. Despite these hurdles, gun ownership remains popular in Brazil and being home to notable manufacturers like Taurus makes the country the second-largest gun-producing nation in the Western Hemisphere.

6. Mexico

  • Estimated private firearms: 15,500,000
  • 15 guns per 100 residents

Previously, Mexico’s constitution guaranteed the right to bear arms. The current version limits that right to only keeping arms, and in practice, gun ownership is heavily restricted. In some of Mexico’s more dangerous areas, security forces are spread thin and residents are called upon to defend themselves with their own firearms.

5. Pakistan

  • Estimated private firearms: 18,000,000
  • 12 guns per 100 residents

Home of the notorious Khyber Pass and its gun “industry,” it comes as no surprise that Pakistan made it onto this list. Amateur and experienced gunsmiths alike work in the Khyber Pass region, producing unlicensed and, in many cases, homemade-quality firearms from materials like railway rails and scrap metal.

4. Germany

  • Estimated private firearms: 25,000,000
  • 30 guns per 100 residents

Whether it’s for hunting wild boar or sport shooting, guns are very popular in Germany. Commonplace though they might be, Germany has severe restrictions on what kind of guns one can buy, and applicants for gun ownership must prove a need before being issued a permit. Self-defense isn’t necessarily an accepted reason. Nonetheless, German gun owners say that such regulations are expected.

“On the one hand, we think, ‘Oh, it’s very restrictive, and we don’t like that,’” sport shooter Friedrich Gepperth told NPR. “On the other hand, each case of misuse by a legal gun owner is very bad for us, so we are not going against the restrictions very much.”

3. China

  • Estimated private firearms: 40,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Surprised to see this country on the list? Despite having some of the strictest gun laws in the world—a blanket ban on private firearm ownership—gun culture seems to be taking hold. How is this possible? With a multitude of shooting and hunting clubs, guns are once again finding their place back into Chinese hands. According to some, it’s hard not to romanticize firearms due to their popularity in film and television.

“In the 1960s, shooting was for national defense,” Xie Xianqiao, a former shooting coach, told The Wall Street Journal. “These days, shooting is entertainment.”

That said, private ownership without the proper permits can still lead to a hefty fine and lengthy prison sentence. Crimes committed with a firearm often receive the death penalty.

2. India

  • Estimated private firearms: 45,000,000
  • 5 guns per 100 residents

Guns in the world’s most populous democracy are both protection and a status symbol. Proper firearms are expensive—enough to be included in dowries—and a single 1911 pistol can sell for several times its asking US price. Domestically-produced guns are available, but lack the reliability and style of foreign-made firearms. Concern over sexual attacks have also led to guns becoming more popular among women—as well as fathers.

Bank manager Jagdeep Singh says he keeps a pistol on his hip to fight off bandits during long car rides, but it also gives him safety of mind when he’s home.

“I have two good-looking daughters,” he told The Los Angeles Times, “another reason I keep a gun.”

1. United States of America

  • Estimated private firearms: 270,000,000
  • 89 guns per 100 residents

Was there ever really any doubt that we’d be number one on this list? The United States of America is by far the best country in the world to be in if you want to own guns. The constitutional right to keep and bear arms (where it isn’t infringed upon by local law), combined with large popular support for gun ownership and easy availability, make the United States a gun collector’s dream.

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In blow to Obama, Saudi king and other leaders to skip Gulf summit

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This is from The Time of Israel.

The Saudis and everyone else know Obamas deal with Iran is a fatal mistake for many people.

 

Only two heads of state will attend high-level meeting meant to assuage Arab fears over nuclear deal with Iran

Newly crowned Saudi King Salman has refused an invitation to attend a landmark summit hosted by President Barack Obama, amid angst over US-Iran nuclear negotiations.

Obama had invited six Gulf kings, emirs and sultans to the presidential retreat at Camp David, seeking to shore up wavering trust while Washington negotiates with regional power Tehran.
Obama’s plans now lie in tatters, with only two heads of state slated to attend the Thursday meeting.

Saudi Arabia’s embassy in Washington said Sunday that newly-named Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef would instead lead the Saudi delegation to the meeting.

The king’s youthful son, Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — who is tipped as a possible future successor and who has driven recent military operations in Yemen — will also attend.

Even before becoming king, Salman was rumored to be suffering from dementia, and his son and the now crown price have played oversized roles in Saudi foreign policy.

As late as Friday, US officials said they had expected Salman to come to Washington, before learning of the change in plan.

“This is not in response to any substantive issue,” insisted one senior US administration official.

Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir said Salman would miss the meeting “due to the timing of the summit, the scheduled humanitarian ceasefire in Yemen and the opening of the King Salman Center for Humanitarian Aid,” according to the embassy statement.

Obama had planned to meet the king one-on-one a day before the gathering.

Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Issa al-Khalifa will also miss the meeting, officials indicated Sunday, with the crown prince coming instead.

That means Obama will likely meet only the leaders of Kuwait and Qatar, despite the prestigious invitation.

The White House had hoped the meeting would assuage deep unease over Iran talks, which Gulf states see as a Faustian bargain, and Obama’s perceived disengagement from the region.

Gulf officials had been pressing for the United States to supply advanced weapons like F-35 stealth fighters as well as a written security guarantee in the face of a threat from Iran.

“I think we are looking for some form of security guarantee, given the behavior of Iran in the region, given the rise of the extremist threat,” said Yousef al-Otaiba, the United Arab Emirates’ ambassador to the United States.

“In the past, we have survived with a gentleman’s agreement with the United States about security. I think today, we need something in writing. We need something institutionalized.”

“I don’t believe there’s a single country (in the council) that doesn’t think a defense shield for the region is a bad idea,” Otaiba said. “The challenge is how do you turn on a regional defense system when different countries are purchasing different equipment and at different paces? How do you link it? How do you get the radars to talk to each other?”

A high-level Saudi official told The Associated Press in Riyadh that his country wants a defense system and military cooperation similar to what the US affords Israel.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to disclose details of the Saudis’ wish list at the summit, said they also want access to high-tech military equipment, missiles, planes and satellites, as well as more technology and training cooperation with the US.

The Iran nuclear deal — which could be agreed to in June — would curb Tehran’s nuclear program in return for unfreezing sanctions and funds worth more than $100 billion.

Gulf states fear that money could be used to by arms and further support Shiite proxy groups in the region.

A US official said a key part of the meetings would be to support a common Gulf defense infrastructure.

“This focus on mutual security extends to various areas -– counterterrorism, maritime security, cybersecurity and ballistic missile defense,” the official said.

Washington and the Gulf nations are also expected to discuss conflicts across the Middle East including in Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen.

Yemen in chaos
The Obama administration has privately pressed Saudi Arabia to ease an imprecise air campaign on Yemen that appears to have had a limited military impact but caused humanitarian suffering.

More than 1,400 people have been killed since late March in the conflict, according to the United Nations.

Aid agencies have called for an immediate ceasefire in a statement signed by 17 organizations.

Salman said the Saudi-led air war was launched on Yemen to foil a plot by a “sectarian group” to undermine Middle East security.

He said the campaign prevented Yemen from becoming a “theater of terrorism.”

Officials also pointed out that missiles capable of reaching Saudi Arabia fell under the control of Iran-backed Huthi rebels.

After more than six weeks of Saudi-led air strikes, Yemeni rebels said they would respond “positively” to ceasefire efforts and their allies accepted a US-backed truce plan.

Riyadh has offered a five-day humanitarian truce from Tuesday evening. The country said its ceasefire offer is conditional on the rebels reciprocating and not exploiting it for military advantage.

But on Sunday, Saudi artillery responded to rocket fire from Yemen that wounded four women inside the country.

FBI: New Yorker from Yemen plotted to kill troops

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This is from Yahoo News.

How many more of these Benedict Arnold’s and Quisling’ss are still out there?

Sadly, we will never know.

 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — A New York business owner from Yemen plotted vengeance attacks against members of the U.S. military for American actions overseas and Shiite Muslims over the civil war in Syria, according to federal authorities.

Federal authorities said in court papers that Mufid Elfgeeh, 30, of Rochester, bought two handguns and two silencers as part of a plan to kill members of the U.S. armed forces returning from war, as well as Shiites in the Rochester area.

Elfgeeh was arrested Saturday and faces two counts of receiving and possessing an unregistered firearm silencer. No plea was entered during a court appearance Monday. Public defender Mark Hosken, who was appointed to handle the case, was not available for comment.

The investigation included linking Elfgeeh’s home computer to tweets from alias Twitter accounts expressing support for al-Qaida, violent holy war and Sunni insurgent groups in Syria, according to court papers.

The FBI gave an informant a Walther PPK .32-caliber handgun and a Glock 26, 9 mm handgun, both with functional silencers affixed to the barrels, two boxes of .32-caliber ammunition, and two boxes of 9-millimeter ammunition, according to the affidavit.

Elfgeeh, a naturalized U.S. citizen who operates Halal Mojo and Food Mart in Rochester, paid the informant $1,050 in the transaction completed Saturday afternoon and was immediately arrested for possession of the silencers not registered in his name.

U.S. Attorney William Hochul said Monday that Elfgeeh faces 10 years in prison for each silencer and the possibility of a $250,000 fine.

Elfgeeh frequently used Twitter to tweet and retweet messages expressing support for various terrorist groups and holy war, seeking donations to assist fighters in Syria, and praising al-Qaida as “our only savior,” authorities said.

According to an FBI affidavit, a government informant taped a December conversation with Elfgeeh in which he stated: “I’m thinking about doing something here to be honest with you. I’m thinking about just go buy a big automatic gun from off the street or something and a lot of bullets and just put on a vest or whatever and just go around and start shooting.”

Authorities said Elfgeeh changed his plans in March to killing returning soldiers, and he said in a taped conversation with an informant that he planned to act alone: “It could be right now in the daytime, and I could be like this guy here or something I could just go back and wait for him to when he leave to go to his garage, and just walk up slowly, boom, boom, boom, inside his garage.”

When an informant asked him whether he was going to release a video message of his attacks, Elfgeeh responded, “Once we do five or ten already, 15, something like that then we gonna say something,” according to the affidavit.

Even though Elfgeeh used the word “we,” most of his comments indicated he intended to act alone and not immediately.

The FBI said it had been investigating Elfgeeh since early last year.

In an appearance Monday before a federal magistrate, Elfgeeh was appointed a lawyer from the Federal Public Defender’s Office and was sent to Monroe County Jail.

A bail hearing has been scheduled for June 16.

 

SHARIA IN ACTION: 15-YEAR-OLD GIRL BURNED TO DEATH BY HER FATHER FOR TALKING ON THE CELL PHONE

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This is from  Pamela Geller’s Atlas Shrugs.

Savages stuck in the Seventh Century strikes again.

 The images below are very graphic.

 

Why does it matter that the practice of honor killing has Islamic sanction? Because if the roots of honor killing are never discussed and always ignored, the practice will never stop. Until the Islamic roots of the practice are discussed openly and human rights groups begin calling for reform, honor killings will continue in the Islamic world — and in Muslim communities in the West.

15-Year-old Girl Burned to Death by Her Father for Talking on the Cell Phone Sharia Unveiled

Burnt Alive 1

A Yemeni father has burned his 15-year-old daughter to death for keeping in touch with her fiance, police said, sparking further outrage in Yemen.

by, The Toronto Sun

Sanaa, Yemen: A Yemeni father has burned his 15-year-old daughter to death for keeping in touch with her fiance, police said, sparking further outrage in Yemen, where an eight-year girl died from internal bleeding on her wedding night a month ago.Police said a 35-year-old man had been arrested after the teenager’s death in a remote village in the central Taiz province. “The father committed this heinous crime on the pretext that his daughter had been keeping contacts with her fiance,” the police website said on Tuesday, giving no further details.

Some local news websites reported that the father had caught the girl chatting by telephone with her fiance.
Traditional tribal customs in parts of Yemen prohibit contacts between men and women before marriage.

Poverty and concern about “family honour” prompts many Yemenis to marry off their daughters young, often below the age of 18, a practice that has been criticised by international rights groups.
Yemeni authorities said last month they were investigating the death of the eight-year-old girl in northern Yemen, and that they would prosecute those responsible.

 

Obama to Release One Third of Gitmo Inmates to Libya

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This is from Freedom Outpost. 

A former Gitmo detainee lead the animals that murdered or Ambassador.

Now brother Moose Slime Obama wants to release 53 more detainees.

We should have dealt with them n the manner allowed by the Geneva Convention.

Shooting them as they were combatants that were not in any military uniform.

Yesterday I wrote about the man that is the alleged leader, Abu Sufian bin Qumu. behind the Libyan attacks that led to the deaths of four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens. He was formerly held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.Now Barack Obama is set to release 55 Gitmo prisoners into Libyan custody.

According to a list that was made public by the Obama administration, most of those to be released are from Yemen.

Politico reports,

Since 2009, the U.S. Government has kept under wraps the list of detainees approved for release. In a court filing back then (posted here), the State Department’s envoy for Guantanamo, Ambassador Daniel Fried, cited a need to coordinate diplomatic efforts to resettle the war-on-terror prisoners.

However, in the new court filings Friday, Justice Department lawyers said that need no longer merited keeping the list secret. They didn’t quite concede that the resettlement process has stalled, but that was the implication. Congress has also greatly complicated releases from Guantanamo with a series of legislative measures attached to budget bills that Obama signed into law.

“In the over two years since the [Guantanamo Bay Review] Task Force completed its status reviews, circumstances have changed such that the decisions by the Task Force approving detainees for transfer no longer warrant protection,” the DOJ lawyers wrote in their notice to the court (posted here).

“The efforts of the United States to resettle Guantanamo detainees have largely been successful – they have resulted in 40 detainees being resettled in third countries because of treatment or other concerns in their countries of origin since 2009. In addition, 28 detainees have been repatriated to their countries of origin since 2009. Consequently, the diplomatic and national security harms identified [by Fried in a 2009 court filing] are no longer as acute. In Respondents’ view, there is no longer a need to withhold from the public the status of detainees who have been approved for transfer.”

The release of the Yemeni prisoners from Guantanamo was planned in 2010, but it appears the Obama administration was unwilling to do so because it considered the conditions of the country to be too “unsettled” at the time.

Remember, one of Barack Obama’s promises was to close Gitmo. Could this be the opportunity he has waited for? One thing is for sure, in the wake of the Libyan attacks, this seems to be a very poor move on his part.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has also advocated the close of Guantanamo Bay. ACLU attorney Zachary Katznelson said, “These men have now spent three years in prison since our military and intelligence agencies all agreed they should be released.”

The ACLU website put out a statement on Friday that reads in part:

Today, just weeks after the ACLU filed a Freedom of Information Act request seeking the information, the government released the names of 55 of the prisoners approved for transfer from the prison at Guantánamo Bay. The prisoners were unanimously designated for transfer by President Obama’s inter-agency Guantánamo Bay Review Task Force, which announced a summary of its findings in January 2010. But before today, the government had said the list could not be released because doing so would hamper efforts to repatriate and resettle prisoners in other countries.

Today’s release is a partial victory for transparency, and it should also be a spur to action. These men have now spent three years in prison since our military and intelligence agencies all agreed they should be released.

Not on the list, of course, is Adnan Latif, who died in his cell earlier this month despite having been repeatedly approved for release from Guantánamo.

It is well past time for our government to release and resettle these unfairly imprisoned men.

Awlaki family files suit against US government over drone strikes

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This is from Fox New Politics.

I have mixed feelings on these drone strikes against Americans.

But by the same token they sided with our enemies.

They had vowed to kill Americans and attack American citizens.

So they deserved to die.

Relatives of three U.S. citizens killed in drone strikes in Yemen last year, including radical Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, are suing the U.S. government for targeting the terrorism suspects “without due process.”

The wrongful death lawsuit, filed Wednesday, claims that the killings of U.S. citizens al-Awlaki, his 16-year-old son Abdulrahman al-Awlaki and operative Samir Khan were unconstitutional. Khan was the publisher of the terror magazine Inspire.

The complaint, prepared by the American Civil Liberties Union and Center for Constitutional Rights, was filed against four senior national security officials: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, CIA Director David Petraeus and senior commanders of the military’s Special Operations forces, Adm. William McRaven of the Navy and Lt. Gen. Joseph Votel of the Army.

The lawsuit says: “The U.S. practice of ‘targeted killing’ has resulted in the deaths of thousands of people, including many hundreds of civilian bystanders. While some targeted killings have been carried out in the context of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, many have taken place outside the context of armed conflict, in countries including Yemen, Somalia, Pakistan, Sudan, and the Philippines.”

“These killings rely on vague legal standards, a closed executive process, and evidence never presented to the courts. … The killings violated fundamental rights afforded to all U.S. citizens, including the right not to be deprived of life without due process of law,” the lawsuit says.

Anwar al-Awlaki, though, was considered a dangerous enemy of the United States linked to several attempted attacks and plots.

President Obama said after his death that Awlaki “took the lead in planning and directing efforts to murder innocent Americans.”

Al-Awlaki, who was born in New Mexico, and Khan, a naturalized U.S. citizen whose family lived in Charlotte, N.C., were killed Sept. 30, 2011, during a U.S. drone strike in Yemen. Al-Awlaki’s teenage son, Abdulrahman, who was born in Colorado, was killed in a separate strike on Oct. 14.

Click here to read the lawsuit

 

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